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Full text of "Reports of proceedings .."

BOSTON 
PUBLIC 
LIBRARY 




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in 2012 with funding from 

Boston Public Library 



http://archive.org/details/reportsofproceed1869bost 



CITY GOVERNMENT 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Organization of the City Government, 

JAN. 4, 1869. 



The two branches of the City Government met 
in their respective chambers in the City Hall at 10 
o'clock this morning for the organization of the 
go vernment for the present municipal year. 

BOABO OF ALDEKMEH, 

His Honor the Mayor, accompanied by Judge 
Gray of the Supreme Court and the Rev. Mr. Bur- 
roughs, entered the Alrlermen's room at 10.%. 
o'clock, the new Board being present. 

Shortly after Messenger Spurr announced a mes- 
senger from the Common Council, who stated that 
he was authorized to inform His Honor the Mayor 
and Aldermen that a quorum of the Common 
Council was present ready to be qualified. 

Mayor Shurtleff said, "You will have the kind- 
ness to report that the Major and Aldermen will 
attend the Common Council in Convention for 
that purpose." 

The Mayor and Aldermen then proceeded to the 
Common Council Chamber, where the two 
branches met in Convention. 

COM MOW coxrwcii.. 

The Common Council was called to order at 10 
o'clock, by Joel Biehards of Ward Eight, senior 
member, who represented Ward Ten in 1853. 

On motion of Mr. Hall of Ward One, it was or- 
dered that a committee be appointed to receive 
the credentials of members. 

Messrs. Ball of Ward One, Leighton of Ward 
Nine, and Vannevar of Ward Eight, were appoint- 
ed the Committee on Credentials. The committee 
reported that they had received the credentials of 
fifty-seven members. 

Mr. Denny of Ward Ten moved that a committee 
be appointed to inform the Mayor and Aldermen 
that a quorum of members of the Common Coun- 
cil were present and were ready to be qualified. 

Mr. Denny was appointed on that committee and 
soon reported that the Muyor and Aldermen would 
without delay wait upon the Common Council for 
their qualification. 

IN CONVENTION. 

His Honor, Mayor Shurtleff, with the Board of 
Aldermen, came in, accompanied by Justice Hor- 
ace Gray of the Supreme Judicial Court, Kev. 
Henry Burroughs, Jr., and others. 

Prayer was offered by itev. Mr. Burroughs. 

The oaths of office were administered to the 
Mayor by Judge Gray. 

The oaths of office were administered by the 
Mayor, first to the members elect of the Board of 
Aldermen, and then to the members elect of the 
Common Council. 

All of the members of the Board of Aldermen 
were present. James K. Crowley of Ward Seven 
and Giles H. Kich of Ward Fourteen, of the Com- 
mon Council, were not present 

Tne Mayor then proceeded to read his inaugural 
address. 

The reading of the Mayor's address occupied an 
hour and twenty minutes in its delivery, many 
portions of it being omitted. 

The oaths of office were then administered to 
James K. Crowley of Ward Seven. 

The business of the Convention being concluded, 
the Convention was dissolved and the Mayor and 
Aldermen withdrew. 

ELECTION OF PRESIDENT. 

On motion of Mr. Nelson of Ward Nine it was 
ordered that the Council proceed to the election 
of President. 

Messrs. Nelson of Ward Nine, Snow of Ward 
Eleven and Jenks of Ward Three, were appointed 
a committee to receive, sort and count the votes 
for President. 



The committee reported as follows : 

Whole number of votes 59 

Necessary to a choice 30 

Wm. G. Harris of Ward Eleven 58 

Francis W. Jacobs of Ward Five 1 

Mr. Harris was declared elected, and Mr. Pick- 
ering of Ward Fourteen was appointed a commit- 
tee to conduct the President elect to the chair. 

The President on taking the chair addressed the 
Council as follows : 

ADDRESS OP PRESIDENT HARRIS. 

Gentlemen of the Common Council: For the ex- 
pression of your confidence and regard, you will 
6 lease accept my sincere and heart-felt thanks, 
'istrusting my ability, but not your forbearance 
and intelligence, I cheerfully aecept the honorable 
position assigned me, with the sincere purpose to 
discharge the often delicate duties of a presiding 
officer with that degree of jusitice and impartial- 
ity which shall merit your approval. The duties 
of the chair are somewhat new to me. If, after 
some experience, I shall be able to promote your 
comfort and happiness in the discharge of your 
official duties, my highest expectations will be re- 
alized. 

With pleasure I recognize a majority of my as- 
sociates, as those who have had experience in pre- 
vious city governments. You will pardon me, if I 
suggest that the business incident to the organiz- 
ation of the city government be not unnecessarily 
hurried, as it appears desirable that new members 
should have ample opportunity of forming a cor- 
rect judgment on measures which may be pro- 
posed. 

Gentlemen, let the varied interests represented 
in our growing municipality receive your careful 
attention, and at the close of our official service, 
let us have the satisfaction of knowing that we 
have done what we could to promote, in the high- 
est degree, the welfare of a city renowned for its 
enterprise, its virtue, and its intelligence. The 
Council having thus far been organized,„the chair 
awaits its action. 

ELECTION OF CLERK. 

On motion of Mr. Tucker of Ward Six, it was 
voted that the Council proceed to the election of 
Clerk. 

Messrs. Tucker of Ward Six, Wilkins of Ward 
Nine, and Dinsmore of Ward Two, were appointed 
a committee to receive, sort and count the votes 
for Clerk. 
The committee reported as follows: 

Whole number of votes 58 

Necessary to a choice 30 

Washington P. Gregg 58 

Mr. Gregg was declared elected, and the oaths 
of office were administered to him by John P. 
Healy, Esq., City Solicitor. 
On 'motion of Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteen it was 
Ordered, That a committee be apointed to in- 
form the Board of Aldermen of the organization of 
the Common Council by the election of Wm. G. 
Harris as President and Washington P. Gregg as 
Clerk. 

Mr. Keith was appointed the Committee under 
the order. 

ASSIGNMENTS. 

On motion of Mr. Gray of Ward Twelve, Thurs- 
day evening next at 8 o'clock, was assigned for 
choice of a Standing Committee on Accounts. 

Messrs. Gray of Ward Twelve, Jacobs of Ward 
Five, and Talbot of Ward Four, were appointed a 
Committee to nominate candidates lor such Com- 
mittee. 

On motion of Mr. Wadsworth of Ward Four, 
Thursday evening next, at 8^ o'clock, was assign- 
ed for the election of Committee on Finance, and 
Messrs. Wadsworth of Ward Four, Keith of Ward 
Fifteen, and Poor of Ward Eleven, were appoint- 
ed a committee to nominate candidates for elec- 
tion as such committee. 

RULES AND ORDERS. 

On motion of Mr. Hopkins of Ward Ten the 
rules and orders of the Common Council of last 
year were adopted for the government of the Com- 
mon Council until otherwise ordered. 

Messrs. Tucker of Ward Six, Dinsmore of Ward 
Two, and Wilkins of Ward Nine, were appointed a 
Committee to prepare rules for the government of 
the Common Council the present year. 

The same persons were also joined to the Com- 
mittee of the Board of Aldermen to prepare joint 



JANUARY 



18 6 9. 



2 



rules and orders for the government of the City 
Council trie present year. 

On motion of Mr. Wilkins of Ward Nine, the 
joint rules and orders of the Council of last year 
"were adopted until otherwise ordered. 

On motion ot Mr. Keith of Waid Fifteen, it was 
ordered that the Mayor be requested to furnish a 
copy of his address to be printed. 

A message was received from the Board of Al- 
dermen, with the statements that the Board had 
been organized by the choice of President. 

A proposition tor a further Convention for the 
choice of City Clerk was concurred in. 

MEETINGS OF THE COUNCIL. 

On motion of Mr. Batchelder of Ward Four, it 
was ordered that when the Council adjourn it be 
to Thursday evening at iy a o'clock, and that that 
be the day and the hour for the future meetings of 
the Council. 

IN CONVENTION. 

The Mayor and Aldermen came in for a conven- 
tion for a choice of City Clerk. 

Alderman Talbot, and Messrs. Wells of Ward 
Three, and Pickering of Ward Fourteen, were ap- 
pointed a committee to receive, sort and count 
the votes for City Clerk. 

The committee reported as follows : 

Whole number ot votes 68 

Necessaiyto a choice 35 

Samuel F. McCleary 66 

George P. Darrow 1 

L. Foster Morse 1 

Mr. McCleary was declared elected and the oaths 
ot office were administered to him by the Mayor. 

The business of the Convention being concluded 
the Mayor and Aldermen withdrew. 

IN COMMON COUNCIL. 

The President appointed as the Committee on 
Elections Messrs. Hall of Ward One, Keaney of 
Ward Two, Johnston of Ward Twelve, Jenks of 
Ward Three, and Judson of Ward Fourteen. 

ORDERS ADOPTED. 

On motion of Mr. Snow of Ward Eleven it was 
Ordered, That the Clerk of the Common Council 
be directed to prepare and cause to be printed a 
transcript of the Journal of the Council for the 
current municipal year. 
On motion of Mr. Nelson of Ward Nine, it was 
Ordered, That the Municipal Register, with the 
names of members and such other matters as are 
usually contained therein, be prepared and 
printed under the direction of the Committee on 
Joint Rules and Orders. 

SEATS OF MEMBERS. 

The usual drawing of seats of members took 
place, under the direction of the President, Clerk, 
and City Messenger. 

PETITION. 

Mr. Gray of Ward Twelve presented a petition 
from Albert J. Wright and others, asking for a re- 
count of the votes in that ward for members of the 
Common Council. Referred to the Oommittee on 
Elections. Adjourned. 

BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

Upon the dissolution of the Convention the 
Board of Aldermen assembled in its chamber, his 
Honor the Mayor in the chair. 

The Board proceeded to organize with the fol- 
lowing result : 



For Chairman, Benjamin James received 11 bal- 
lots, their being; one blank, and he was declared 
unanimously elected. 

The Mayor retired from the chair and it was oc- 
cupied by Mr. James, who thanked the Board for 
this mark of confidence. 

Aldermen Richards and White were appointed 
to draw jurois. 

Alderman Richards moved that the Common 
Council be notified of the organization of this 
Board by the choice of Benjamin James for Chair- 
man. 

The motion prevailed, and a message was sent to 
the Council to inform that branch of the organi- 
zation of the Board. 

The messenger on his return was accompanied 
by Councilman James M. Keith of Ward Fifteen, 
who informed the Board of the organization of the 
Council by the choice ofWm. G.Harris of Ward 
Eleven for President, and Washington P. Gregg 
for Cleik. 

On motion of Alderman Pratt, a message was 
sent to the Common Council proposing a conven- 
tion for the purpose of choosing a City Clerk for 
the succeeding municipal year. 

A comrounication was received informing the 
Board of the concurrence of the Council in the 
order for a convention. 

The Board then (by motion) proceeded to the 
Council Chamber, where the two branches mec in 
convention. 

The Board upon reassembling proceeded to busi- 
ness. 

Alderman Talbot moved that the Rules and Or- 
ders ot the Board ot 1868 be adopted as the Rules 
and Orders of this Board, until otherwise ordered, 
and that Aldermen (blank) be a committee to ex- 
amine and report if any alterations are required 
therein. Adopted, and Aldermen Talbot, White 
and James were appointed as that committee. 

Alderman Richards presented an order "That a 
special committee, consisting of two on the part 
of this Board with such as the Common Council 
may join, be appointed and authorized to exercise 
all the powers in reference to the Church Street 
District conferred by the City Council of 1868, up- 
on the committee on said district." Passed, and 
Aldermen Richards and James were appointed on 
said committee. 

On motion of Alderman Bradlee, Monday at tour 
o'clock V. M. was assigned as the day and hour for 
holding the regular meetings of this Board until 
otherwise ordered. 

The Board then proceeded to ballot for Commit- 
tee on Accounts, with the following result: 

Whole number of votes 11 

Necessary to a choice 6 

Benjamin James had 11 

Edward A. White 11 

Moses Fairbanks 11 

And they were declared elected. 

Alderman James presented the following order : 

"That the members of the Board of Aldermen, 
and one member of the Common Council from 
each Ward, be a committee to determine and 
pay the allowances of "State aid" to the families 
of disabled soldiers and sailors and the families of 
the slain, pursuant to the acts of the Legislature of 
this Commonwealth ; and that said Committee have 
power to employ a Paymaster and such clerical 
assistants as may be required for this purpose, 
and that the expense thereof may be charged to 
the appropriation for war expenses. 

Passed and sent down for concurrence. 

Aldermen Seaver and Fairbanks were joined to 
the Committee on Joint Rules and Regulations. 
Adjourned. 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceeding's of the Common Council, 

JAN. 7, 1869. 



The first regular meeting of the Coininon Coun- 
cil for tlie present year was held at 7)< o'clock this 
evening, the President, William G. Harris, in the 
chair. 

QUALIFICATION OF A MEMBER. 

Mr. Pickering of "Ward Fourteen presented the 
credentials of Giles H.Rich, member elect from 
Ward Fourieen. 

The oaths of office were administered to Mr. Rich 
liy John P. Healej, Esq., City Solicitor, and an or- 
der was passed that a message be sent to the Beard 
of Aldermen to inform that branch of his qualifi- 
cation. 

PAPERS FROM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

On the order appointing Aldermen Richards and 
James, with such as the Common Council may 
join, a Committee on the Church Street District, 
there were ioined on the part of the Common 
Council, Messrs. Wadswortb of Ward 4, Leighton 
of Warci !), and Hopkins of Ward 10. 

On the order appointing the members of the 
Board of Aldermen, with one member of the Com- 
mon Council from each Ward, a Committee on 
State Aid to the families of disabled soldiers and 
sailors, and of the slam, the following-named per- 
sons were joined: 

Ward 1, J. H. Pote ; 2, M. Keany ; 3, T. L. Jenks ; 
4, N. H. Daniels; 5, M.J.Cole; 6, H.G.Tucker; 
7, J. K. Crowley; 8, E. B. Vannevar; 9, W.Frost; 
10, C. S. Butler; 11, G. E, Leonard; 12, G. H. John- 
ston; I", J. X. Ryan; 14, G. C. Judson; 15, J. A. 



Rogers. 



REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 



Mr. Tucker of Ward Six, from the Committee to 
Prepare Rules and Orders for the Government ot 
the Common Council during the present muni- 
cipal year, reported an order, as follows: 

Ordered, That the rules and orders of the last 
Common Council be adopted as the Bules and Or- 
ders of this Common Council, until otherwise or- 
dered. 

The report was accepted, and the Kules and Or- 
ders were adopted. 

Mr. fucker of Ward Six irom the Joint Special 
Committee to prepare joint rules and orders for 
the government of the City Council during the 
present municipal year, made a report as follows: 

Ordered, That the rules and orders of the last 
City Council be adopted as the rules and orders ot 
this City Council, with the following amendments, 
viz: 

Insert after the seventh paragraph, on page 40 
of the Municipal Register, for 1868, the following 
paragraph : 

"A Committee on the City Surveyor's Depart- 
ment, to consist ot two Aldermen, and three mem- 
bers of the Common Council." 

In the first line of the ninth paragraph (Com- 
mittee on Printing) strike out the word "one" and 
insert in the place thereof the word "two." 

In the second line of said paragraph, strike out 
the word "two" and insert tlie word "three" 
(making two Aldermen and three members of the 
Common Council to constitute the committee.) 

The repor v . was accepted, and the rules and or- 
ders were adopted. 

Mr. Wadsworth, from the committee to nomi- 
nate candidates tor a Committee on Finance, 
made a report, recommending the election of the 
following-named persons: Francis A. Osborn, 
George P. Denny, Samuel T. Snow, Henry W. 
Pickering, Melville E. Ingalls, Thomas Dinsinore, 
Joel Richards. 

The report was accepted. 

Mr. Gray of Ward Twelve, from the Committee 
to nominate candidates for a Committee on Ac- 
counts on the part of the Common Council, made 
a report recommending the election of the iollow- 
ing named persons: 



Edward E. Batchelder, Wm. M. Flanders, Fred- 
erick A. Wilkins, Wm. Hobbs, Jr., Granville T. W. 
Braman. The report was accepted. 

RECOUNT OF VOTES IN WARD TWELVE. 

Mr. Hall ot Ward One, from the Committee on 
Elections, on the petition of Albert J. Wright and 
others, for a recount of the votes for members of 
the Common Council for Ward Twelve, made a re- 
port that the votes had been carefully recounted, 
with the following result: 

George H. Johnston had 812 

Hollis U. Gray 750 

S( loraon A. Woods 739 

Melville E. Ingalls 651 

Henry W. Wilson 615 

Thos. I.eavitt 574 

U. L. Pettingill 553 

Chas. Hurwood 516 

Scattering 18 

By this result, it appeared that the sitting mem- 
bers had been duly elected. 
The report was accepted. 

COMMITTEES TO NOMINATE PUBLIC OFFICERS. 

On motion of Mr. Hall of Ward One, it was or- 
dered that a Committee o( — , with such as the 
Board of Aldermen maj join, be appointed to 
nominate Chief and Assistant Engineers of the 
Fire Department. This motion was subsequently 
amended, on motion ot Mr. Gray, so as to make 
the Committee on the part of the Council to 
consist of one from each Ward. The President 
appointed the Committee a« follows: 

Ward 1, Hall; 2, Doherty; 3, Wells; 4, Wads- 
worth ; 5, Flanders ; 6, Tucker ; 7, Elynn ; 8, Squires ; 
9, Frost; If), Butler; 11, Poor; 12, Johnston; 13, 
Kyan ; 14, Hich ; 15, Conant. 

The following Committees weie appointed on 
several motions, to lie joined by the Board of Al- 
dermen, for the nomination of 'candidates for the 
Boards designated, namely: 

To Nominate a Water Board — Messrs. Snow of 
Ward 11; Hopkins of Wara 10; Flynn of Ward 7 

To fill vacancies existing in the Board of Direct- 
ors of Public Institutions -Messrs. Batchelder of 
Ward 4, Wooliey of Ward 1, Jacobs of Ws^rd 5. 

To nominate Trustees ot the City Hospital — 
Messrs. Osborn of Ward 0, Learnard ot Ward 11, 
Hobbs of Ward 14. 

To nominate Trustees of the Public Library — 
Messrs. Hopkins of Ward 10: Leighton of Ward 
9; Rogers of Ward 15. 

To 'nominate Superintendents of Bridges — 
Messrs. Gray of Ward 12; Lucas of Ward 7; Bond 
of Ward 8. 

To nominate Trustees of Mount Hope Cemetery 
— Messrs. Wooliey of Ward 1, Malone of Ward 2, 
Belknap of Ward 3. 

To nominate a City Physician— Messrs. Jacobs 
ot Ward 5, Tucker of Ward 6, Hobbs of Ward 14. 

To nominate a Superintendent of Health — 
Messrs. Jenks of Wara 3; Osborn of Ward 6; 
Young ot Wardl. 

COMMITTEE ON MAYOR'S) ADDRESS. 

On motion of Mr. Keith of Ward 15, Messrs. 
Keith of Ward 15, Osborn oT Ward 6, and Picker- 
ing of Ward 14, with such as the Board of Alder- 
men may join, were appointed a committee to con- 
sider and'report what disposition should be made 
of the various topics embraced in the Mayor's in- 
augural address. 

SPECIAL ASSIGNMENTS. 

The special assignment, the election of a Com- 
mittee on Accounts on the part of the Common 
Council, was taken up. 

Messrs. Squires of Ward Eight, Hopkins of 
Ward Ten, and Jenks of AVard Three, were ap- 
pointed a committee to receive, sort and count the 
votes. The committee repoi ted as follows: 

Whole number of votes 57 

Necessaiy to a choice 29 

Edward E. Batchelder 57 

Wm. M.Flanders 55 

Frederick A. Wilkins 2S 

Wm. Hobhs, Jr 35 

Granville T. W. Braman 55 

John W. Leighton 28 

H. W. Pickering 19 

Frederick Wilkins 1 

F. A. Osborn 1 



JANUARY 



18 6 9 



The President declared the five first named to be 
elected, when a question was raised, and it was 
stated that Mr. Wilkins did not appear to have 
the required number for a choice, 

Mr. Keljon of Ward Nine asked if there was not 
one vote for Frederick Wilkins, and whether that 
should not be counted, since it was evident for 
whom it was designed? 

The President said the vote should be counted 
or Frederick A. Wilkins. 

Mr. Jenks ot Ward Three, said that this was the 
first time in his life that he had heard of such a 
decision. In his own case, in an election by the 
people, he was counted out of his seat by throwing 
out votes not having his middle name, and in 
every contested case in the State the decisions 
were against that made in this ca»e. 

Mr. Wilkins said he hoped the Council would 
proceed to another election, for he did not wish to 
be declared elected, if there were any doubt in the 
matter. 

Mr. Nelson cited the election of Marcus Morton 
as Governor, as a case m point, where a vore given 
tor Marcus Moses was counted for Marcus Morton. 

Mr. Rich of Ward Fourteen said that by the rules 
of law the middle name was not an essential part 
of a man's name, and as there could be no doubt 
in this case, it was clear that Mr. Wilkins was 
elected. 



The President said he should take the responsi- 
bility to declare Mr. Wilkins as elected. 

The election of a Committee on Finance of the 
Common Council was taken up, by assignment. 

Messrs. Wadsworth of Ward 4, Kingsbury of 
Ward 15 and Flanders of Ward 5 were chosen a 
Committee to receive, sort and count the votes. 
The Committee reported as follows : 

Whole number of votes 57 

Necessary to a choice 29 

Francis A. Osborn 46 

George P. Denny 52 

Samuel T. Snow 54 

Henry W. Pickering 53 

Melville E. Ingalls 54 

Thomas Dinsmore 53 

Joel Richards 54 

Scattering 18 

The above-named were declared elected. 

ORDER PASSED. 

On motion of Mr. Wadsworth of Ward Four, it 
was Ordered, That the Mayor be requested to pe- 
tition the Legislature for authority to the Water 
Board to reuulate the speed of travel on the drive- 
way of the Chestnut Hill Reservoir, in the towns 
of Brighton and Newton. 

Adjourned. 









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•"«.* ■♦■»■ »-■ - 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN, 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 
JAN. 11, 1869. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Board of Al- 
dermen was held at 4 o'clock this afternoon, his 
Honor, Mayor Shurtleff, presiding. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on Rules 
and Orders for the Government of the Board of 
Aldermen, reported the rules and orders of last 
year, with an amendment to section 23, striking 
out the words "in consultation with the chairman 
of this Board." The amendment was passed and 
the rules and orders, as amended, were adopted. 

COMMON COUNCIL PAPERS. 

The following orders were passed in concur- 
rence : 

Order for adoption of old joint rules till new ones 
are reported. 

Order for Mayor to lurnish copy of his address. 

Order for preparation of Municipal Register 
for 1869. 

Order for Mayor to petition Legislature for au- 
thority to regulate the rate of speed for horses on 
Chestnut Hill roadway. 

COMMITTEES JOINED. 

The following named committees were joined to 
the Committees of the Common Council on the 
nomination of candidates Jor election to the sever- 
al boards named, and for other purposes : 

Mayor's Address— James, Talbot. 

On Nominating Water Board— Richards, Seaver. 

Superintendents of Bridges— Talbot, Van Nos- 
trand. 

Directors oi Institutions — Seaver, Bradlee. 

Trustees of City Hospital— Fairbanks, White. 

Trustees of Public Library— Pratt, Baldwin. 

Trustees of Mount Hope Cemetery— Rice, Van 
Nostrand . 

City Physician— Hawes, Fairbanks. 

Superintendent of Health— Bradlee, Fairbanks. 

Chief and Assistant Engineers — The whole 
Board of Aldermen. 

! Committee on Finance— The Mayor and Chair- 
man of this Board, ex-officiis. 

Aldermen James and Richards were appointed, 
to be joined, to report in print orders establishing 
the salaries of the several city officers during the 
ensuing year. 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

The Mayor announced the several Standing Com- 
mittees, as follows: 

Armories and Military Affairs — Baldwin, Hawes 
and Van Nostrand. 

Assessors' Department — Van Nostrand, Rice and 
Fairbanks. 

Bridges— Seaver, James and Hawes. 

County Accounts— Pratt, Bradlee and Talbot. 

Cemeteries— Bradlee, Pratt and Hawes. 

Common and Public Squares— James, Richards 
and Bradlee. 

Faneull Hall— Richards, James and Seaver. 

Ferries— Seaver, Talbot and Pratt. 

Fire Department — Richards, Seaver and Hawes. 

Health — White, James and Richards. 

Jail— Rice, Baldwin and Van Nostrand. 

Lamps, Bells and Clocks— Pratt, Seaver and 
Bradlee. 

Licenses— White, Fairbanks and Rice. 

Markets, Weights and Measures— Seaver, Pratt 
and Rice. 

Paving— James, Richards and Rice. 

Police— Seaver, White and Fairbanks. 

Sewers — Fairbanks, Baldwin and Talbot. 

Steam Engines— Hawes, Fairbanks and Van Nos- 
trand. 

Streets— Talbot, White and Baldwin. 

JOINT STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Assessors' Department— Van Nostrand, Talbot 
and Baldwin. 
Bathing — Van Nostrand, Fairbanks and Pratt. 
Claims-Talbot, White and Baldwin. 



Engineers' Department— Hawes and Pratt. 

Fire Alarms— Richards and Hawes. 

Fuel— Fairbanks and Pratt. 

Harbor— Hawes and Van Nostrand. 

City Hospital— Baldwin and Talbot. 

Institutions at South Boston and Deer Island- 
James, Richards and Seaver. 

Ordinances— Bradlee, Fairbanks and Talbot. 

Overseers of the Poor and Temporary Home— 
Bradlee and White. 

Printing — Talbot and Fairbanks. 

Public Buildings— Richards, James and Seaver. 

Public Instruction— White, Pratt and Bradlee. 

Public Lands— James, Richards and Van Nos- 
trand. 

Public Libiary— Baldwin, Talbot and White. 

Surveyors' Fepartment— Talbot and Rice. 

Treasury Department— Rice and Baldwin. 

Water— Hawes, Talbot ana Rice. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

Eames & Tucker, for leave to erect a stable for 
nine horses, in Brookline street. Referred to 
Committee on Health. 

Philip Davies, that the city would establish a 
Temporary Home for Inebriates. Referred to 
Committee on Overseers of the Poor. 

E. A. Cusbing and others, for compensation for 
injury to their building on Chauncy street by the 
removal ot the adjacent building on Avon place. 

Leeds, Robinson & Co. and others, that Shoe 
and Leather street be called John street. 

John C. Crowley and others, that Paris street, 
northeast of Porter street, be accepted ana graded. 

C. G. Putnam, for an apportionment of assess- 
ment of taxes tor betterments on Temple place. 

Foster & Taylor and others, for the immediate 
laying out and grading of all the streets on Fort 
Hill. 

Severally referred to the Committee en Streets. 

A. A. Wbitebone, to be licensed as pawnbroker. 
Referred to Committee on Licenses. 

Edward S. Rand and other conveyancers, that D. 
S. Gilchrist be employed to make the early classi- 
fied indexes to Suffolk Deeds. 

Judge and Register of Probate, that certain pa- 
pers in their offices be riled, &c. 

Severally referred to Committee on County Ac- 
counts. 

Milo Whitney, for leave to erect a steam engine 
at No. 1057 Washington street. 

German Catholic Society in Suffolk street, re- 
specting the widening of said street on their 
premises. 

RESIGNATION OF A TRUSTEE OF THE PUBLIC 
LIBRARY. 

The Mayor submitted the following communica- 
tion: 
To the Hoard of Aldermen and Common Council of 

the City of Boston : 

Herewith I transmit to you a communication 
from Hon. John P. Bigelow,* ex-Mayor of this city, 
tendering his resignation ot the office of Trustee of 
the Public Library, which he has held by 
uninterrupted elections from the time of its 
institution until the present time. I need not 
recall to mind the fact that Mr. Bigelow 
has ever been an ardent friend of the 
Library, and that he gave the first money that was 
received towards its foundation, except to state 
my own personal regret that his present feeble 
healtb demands the severance of the tie which has 
for so long a time connected a former civic magis- 
trate and early benefactor and constant friend to 
the Library with the active management of an 
important branch of the City Government. 

N. B. Shurtleff. 

Referred to the Committee on Nomination of 
Trustees of the Public Library. 

AUDITORS MONTHLY EXHIBIT. 

The Auditor's Monthly Exhibit, was submitted, 
g presenting an exhibit of the general and special 
appropriations for the present financial year, as 
shown by the books of his office, including the 
January draft, being nine months' payment of the 
financial year. A recapitulation ot the statement 
is as follows : 

Appropriations, 

Revenues, etc. Expended. Unexpended. 
General. . ..$7,127,548 02 $5,125,425 68 $2,002,122 34 
Special. ... 3,907,844 93 2,435,227 34 1,472,617 59 



$11,035,892 95 $7,560,653 02 $3,474,739 93 



JANUARY 11 



18 9. 



6 



ANNUAL KEPORTS. 

Annual reports from the several departments of 
City Government were made as follows: 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC LANDS. 

Tue sales of lots of public land belonging to the 
city during the last year, amounted to forty, con- 
taiiing 251,114 square feet, for the sum ot" $267,- 
455 22. The receipts on the above amounted in 
cash to 833,834 22, and there was received for 
wharfage and rents $3588 27 ; received for entries 
into-tbe common sewers $2246 65— all of which was 
paid into the city treasury. The total amount of 
expenditures was $14,087 49. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SERVERS. 

The ninth annual report of the Superintendent 
of Sewers states the expenditures of his depart- 
ment during the year to have been $S1,318 63. Of 
this amount the' appropriation for sewers was 
$76,518 45: tor Stony Brook sewer appropriation 
$4*00. 

The report gives a detail of the work which has 
been done, a recapitulation of which is as follows: 
City proper, 2557 feet of sewers, costing $8998 21; 
South Boston, 1503 feet, at a cost of $3563 04; East 
iioston, 325 leet, at a cost of $906 39; Koxbury, 
14,975 leet, at a cost of $52,260 31. Miscellaneous 
expenses, $15,589 68. The total work amounted to 
19,360 feet of sewers, costing $81,318 63. Jn addi- 
tion to this, there has been laid for the Internal 
Health Department 430 feet ot pipe in Dunlow 
Street, end 234 feet of wood sewerage in Orange 
court. 

The Superintendent states that the annexation 
of Koxbury had imposed douole work upon the 
Sewer Department, and had doubled the expenses. 
The demand for sewerage lrom that section had 
been greater than they had been able to supply, 
and another year would greatly increase the de- 
mand. The work on the Stony Brook Sewer had 
beeu finished, and the course of the brook im- 
proved. The drainage at the South End is re- 
ferred to, as requiring attention and fruitful of 
trouble. In the Church street district it will be 
necessary for the present to use the old drains, 
but in another season the old ones will require 
reconstruction. In the construction of Atlan- 
tic avenue, six large sewers will be interfered 
with in their outlet, and measures must be taken 
for their extension. 

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC 
. BUILDINGS. 

The annual report of the Superintendent of Pub- 
lic Buildings, in accordance with the requirements 
of the city charter, gives a statement ot the num- 
ber of buildings under his charge, the condition of 
the same, and the amount of expenditures thereon 
during the year. 

Public Buildings. The expenditures for repairs, 
alterations and improvements of public ouildings 
during the year, were as follows: 

Alterations, repaiis, supplies, water, gas and 
furniture, $87,257 39; rents, $3441 81; fuel, $3051 
73 ; care and cleaning, $6,565 91. Total, $100,310 84. 

County Buildings. There has been expended for 
care, supplies, repairs and furniture, $11,156 25; 
and tor fuel $3713 71, making a total of $14,S69 96. 

Grammar Sclwoihouses. Expended lor repairs, 
alterations and supplies, $54,263 21 ; fuel, $23,435 86 ; 
rents, $3022; care and cleaning, $18,784 3d— total, 
$99,505 43. 

Primary Schoolhouses. Expended for repairs, 
alterations, &c, $51,562 10; fuel, $15,750 18; rents, 
$3992 22; care and cleaning, $14,584 61 ; total, $85,- 
895 17. 

Extraordinary Expenses. New grammar school- 
house in Ward Twelve, containing fourteen school 
rooms, 32 by 29 feet, and an exhibition hall, to be 
ready for occupancy next September, and will cost 
$100,000. 

Grammar Schoolhouse, Ward Nine, containing 
fourteen schoolrooms, 29 by 33.10 feet, and an ex- 
hibition hall, to be ready for occupancy in Septem- 
ber next, and will cost §100,000. 

Primary Schoolhouse, Ward Seven, containing 
Six schoolrooms, 23 by 28 feet, to be ready in March 
next, and to cost $40,000. 

Police Station House,Ward Fifteen,will be com- 
pleted in April next, and cost $50,000. •..■'-.• 

Hose House in Church street, to contain aecom- 
mbdatiohsfor HoSe Cbi No. 8, and award room for 
Ward 9, will be completed in April and cost 
$20,000. .'.,,,..., ■•:..• 



Hose House on North Grove street, for Hose Co. 
No. 3. An appropriation of $18,000 has been made 
lor the erection of the house, which will be com- 
pleted in June next. 

During the past year, the following buildings 
have been completed : Norcross Grammar School- 
house, Wells Grammar Schoolhouse, Lewis Gram- 
mar Schoolhouse, the last costing $68,000 The 
Freeman Primary Senoolhouse- on Coarter street, 
has been erected at a cost of $30,000. The other 
buildings eompleted were: Hose House on Salem 
street, Engine House .No. 1, and Ward Room, 
W.ard 12, Central Charity Bureau and Temporary 
Home. 

An addition to the stable on the Alms House 
lot, Boston Highlands, has been built for use of 
the Internal. Health Department. ' ■ , 

The Unitarian Church, corner of Maverick and 
Bremen streets, has been purchased and converted 
into an armory for the military companies in Wai d 
One, at a cost of $S841 81. The lot contains 4335 
leet.- - 

A lot of land on Newton street, containing 20,600 
feet, lias been purchased at a cost of $49,884 67, as 
a site for a Normal Schoolhouse. 

A lot of land in Ward Thirteen, containing 11, COO 
feet, has been purchased at a cost of $5801 50, as a 
site for a police station house. 

A list of the various buildings owned by the city, 
and those which are hired, is given in the report, 
also the extent and value of the People's Ferry 
property. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF HEALTH. 

The repoit of this official states that the appro- 
priations for his department for the financial year 
1868-9 were $277,500, ana the unexpended balance 
$61,135 75. The amount expended during the finan- 
cial year 18G7-68, from Jan. 1 to May 1, was $63,- 
730 97. Expended from May 1 to Jan. 1, 1869, $216,- 
301 25. Total expenditures, $280,095 22. This 
amount was expended as follows: 

Sweeping and cleaning the streets, cleaning cess- 
pools and removal of snow and ice from walks, 
yards, public garden, &c, $96,688 25. [The cost of 
removing snow, ice, &c, was 267 days team work 
at $3 a day, $801, and 3792 halt days labor at a cost 
ol $6940, making the whole amount $7711 28=] Col- 
lection of house offal and dirt in the city proper. 
$78,183 45. Corn, meal, oats, hay, &c, $24,634 49, 
For pay of firemen, feeders, blacksmiths and other 
principal men, twenty-four in number, $21,664 50. 
Purchase of new horses and exchange of old ones, 
$11,028 50. 

The report gives a detailed account of the ex- 
penditures of the department for the repairs of 
drains, abating nuisances, &c, also for "sundry 
expenses of the Committee, visitation to New 
York, entertaining guests, carriage hire and re- 
freshments, $903 75," making a total of expendi- 
tures for the vear, $280,095 22. 

The bills deposited with the City Treasurer for 
collection, amounted to $30,006 91, and the amount 
collected and paid into the treasury to the credit 
of the department, was $28,605 76, of which sum 
$13,563 11 was paid during the present financial 
year. 

The number ot paupers and prisoners con- 
veyed by the department during the year was as 
follows. 

From Court House to Jail, 4112; to steamer 
Henry Morrison, for Deer Island, on sentence, 2636 ; 
to railroad depot for State Almshouse, 931; 
House of Correction, 459 ; from Jail to Court House 
300; to House of Reformation, 146; to Deer Island 
(permits) 129; to No. 59 Long wharf and Charles 
street Home, 125; Lunatic Hospital, 30— total, 
8968. 

One vehicle is provided by this department for 
carrying prisoners from the several police stations 
to the city lock-up under the Court House, and for 
which the Police Department is charged twenty- 
five cents per head. The returns show the num- 
ber so conveyed to have been 5810 males and 2438 
females, making a total of 8278. 

The Superintendent says of the "sanitary condi- 
tion" of the city, that during the year 1928 persons 
have been notified to abate nuisances on their 
premises, and uf this number 403 were in the High- 
land District. During the year 482 orders were 
passed' by the Board ot Aldermen instructing the. 
Superintendent to abate nuisances and oharge the 
expense to persons so notified. . ,A portion .ot the 
orders passed received immediate 'attention, and 
the remainder required no action, the nuisances 
having been abated. 



7. 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



The annexation of Koxbury brought a large tract 
of territory to the care and custody of this depart- 
ment and and the government, and with it many 
aggravated cases of nuisance, some of the most 
prominent of which are Ward& Co.'s bone boiling 
establishment and Merrill's soap works. The 
nuisance arising from these establishments has 
been unbearable, and all the attempts to cause a 
desirable change m a sanitary point of view by 
this department have proved unsuccessful, yet a 
good work has been performed in certain locali- 
ties by the vigilance of those intrusted with this 
special work. Stringent measures will be required 
in other cases, and it is believed that another 
year's labor will cause greater improvements than 
nave heretofore been made. 

The Superintendent says of tenement buildings, 
"the present year, it is to be hoped, will witness a 
decided change for the better as regards the con- 
struction of tenement buildings, and the occu- 
pancy of cellars, and with the aid of the ponce 
much can be done for the common good of our 
cby." 

Ou the subject ot seweragp, the Superintended 
says, a great demand has been made upon the de- 
partment for drainage in many of the unoccupied 
streets ot Boston Highlands, as well as in the city 
proper. Many tenants are suffering for the want 
of drainage to estates occupied by them, and the 
owners are ready and willing to enter such sewers 
whenever they shall he constructed, but the pres- 
ent low grade'at the Highlands, in certain parts : 
and a want of connection with the mains, has pre- 
vented this department from accomplishing an 
object so much to be desired. 

The Superintendent calls attention to the want, 
long felt, of a deposit for ashes and other material 
collected by the city, severely so during the last 
year, on account of the extreme locations souther- 
ly in which the dumps are made. There are now 
several orders from the Board of Aldermen requir- 
ing deposits at such distances as must involve a 
large expense by hiring or purchasing additional 
teams, and lequ'ire an additional appropriation of 
at least $20,000. It is estimated that each load of 
ashes collected by the city costs $1 50, leaving a 
deficit of $1 lor each load, on which the Board of 
Aldermen establishes the prices in all cases. It is 
recommended that convenient places for dumps 
be at once established on the line of the projected 
Atlantic avenue, to iacilitate the labor and lessen 
the expense ot this department. 

The sanitary poliee station on Flagstaff Hill, 
Boston Common, has been visited during the year 
for the purposes for which it is intended, by 116,- 
770 persons, showing conclusively the importance 
of constructing others in different localities 
throughout the'eity. 

From the growth of the city and the demands 
of the citizens on this aepartment, the Superin- 
tendent suggests that it should be relieved Irom 
tne work oi'cleaning snow from the public walks, 
yards and squares, which would enable it to afford 
greater facilities for keeping up the work. 

KEPORT OF THE CHIEF OF POLICE. 

The report of the Chief of Police gives a great 
variety of statistics relative to his department ot 
the public service. 

The whole number of arrests during theyear was 
19,975, of which 14,122 were committed for "examin- 
ation or tiial: 15,781 were males; foreigners, 13- 
961 ; non-residents, 4344 ; minors, 3951. The nativi- 
ty of the parties was as follows : United States, 
5232; British Provinces, 369; Ireland, 12,814 ; Eng- 
land, 575; France, 102; Germany, 350; Atrica, 172; 
Italy, 40; Portugal, 18; Poland, 6; Scotland, 62; 
Canada, 50 ; Sweden, 15 ; Spain, 11 ; and from fifteen 
other countries, 37. 

The nature of crimes and offences for which ar- 
rests were made were as follows: Assault and 
battery, 1421; felonious assaults, 168; assaults on 
officers, 21 ; assault with weapons, 4 ; attempts to 
commit rape, 9 ; attempt to break and enter, 21 ; 
breaking. and entering, 179; common drunkards, 
466; common railers and brawlers, 4; counterfeit- 
ing, 3 ; cruelty to dumb animals, 10: drunkenness, 
8229; disturbing the peace, 122; disorderly, 2328 ; 
deserters, 60 ; disturbing public meetings, schools, 
&c, 10; embezzlement, 28; escaped convicts, 18; 
fast driving, 20 ; fraud, 14; iorgery, 12; gambling, 
1G ; gaming on the Lord's day, 83 ; idle and disor- 
derly, 46; insane, 121; keeping houses of ill fame, 
64 ; keeping noisy and disorderly houses, 9; lar- 
ceny, 1042; felonious larceny, 406; malicious mis- 



chief, 202; murder, 8; manslaughter, 4; night 
walking, 353; obtaining money and goods under 
false pretences, 16; pickpockets, 40; polygamy, 5; 
runaways, 30; rape, 10; robbery, 78; receiving 
stolen goods, 42 ; suspicion of larceny, 87 ; suspic- 
ious persons, 1160 ; stubborn children, 86; truants, 
222 ; violation of city ordinance, 242; violation of 
Sunday law, 62; vagrants, 214. 

The number of persons furnished with lodgings 
was 30,560, of whom 24,833 were males, 20,090 were 
foreigners, 23,738 non-residents, 4785 minors. The 
nativity of these persons is. reported as follows: 
United States, 10,077; British Provinces, 508; Ire- 
land, 15,656; England, 1819; France, 311; Germany, 
795; Africa, 2C0; Italy, 35; Portugal, 26; Poland, 4; 
Sweden, 46; Spain, 29; Scotland, 757 ; Canada, 123; 
and 09 lrom fourteen other countries. 

Ihe amount of property taken lrom prisoners 
and lodgers while in custody, and restored as per 
their receipts was $55,066 61. Amount of property 
reported as stolen, $126,008; amount leported as 
recovered $107,125 87. Amount of fines imposed 
by the Courts on parties arrested was $37,097 37, 
and the amount of witness fees covered $10,291 24. 
Number of days spent m Court bv officers was 
7482^. The aggregate amount of imprisonment 
imposed was 1*02 years, 10 months and 16 days. 
The number of despatches sent over the police tel- 
egraph was 4579. The number of larcenies re- 
ported at the several police stations was 1914, and 
the number of arrests for committing the same 
was 1492. • 

The following table shows the amount and cost 
of buildings erected during the past year, within 
the limits of the several Police Stations: 



*■ *• . -4 O 00 



CO *- 
o M 
-- 1 OS 



S *s 






a 

o 



o 
o 



s § 






The amount of shipbuilding was as follows : 



3 steamers 3,800 tons 

11 ships 13,725 " 

1 dredge 700 " 

3 barques 2,100 " 

4 schooners 795 " 

1 sloop 50 " 

3 yachts 30 " 

58 boats 



$575,000 

1,078,000 

229,000 

158,000 

62.500 

71000 

3,200 

4,600 



84 21,200 $2,117,300 

Under miscellaneous matters there were report- 
ed: Accidents 515, arrested on warrants 268, boats 
challenged 3783, buildings found open and secured 
2081, cases investigated 1180, defective lamps 15,868, 
defective water pipes 71, defective drains, vaults 
and nuisances 1334, defective cesspools 126, deftec- 



JANUARY 11 



18 6 9. 



8 



ive hydrants 97, disturbances suppressed 8130, dead 
bodies provided for 108, fires extinguished without 
alarm 106, injured persons provided for 29(5, intoxi- 
cated persons helped home 1955, lost children re- 
stored 771, rescued from drowning 40, street ob- 
structions removed 27,400, stray teams put up 197, 
water running to waste 251, vessels boarded 1057. 

Liquor trade— N'-mber of wholesale dealers, 353; 
retail dealers, 1729; total, 2052; unlicensed, 221. 

Houses of doubtful reputation— Number of 
houses, 123; assignation only, 49 ; persons keeping 
gills, 73 ; number of giris, 252. 

Gaming establishments — Billiard rooms, G6; bil- 
liard tables, 242; bowling alleys, 11; bagatelle 
rooms 1G, with 18 boards; prop and faro rooms, 1. 

The police force has been increased from 376 to 
412; 4 have died ; 17 resigned; 16 were discharged ; 
new appointments, 72. 

SUPERINTENDENTS OF BRIDGES. 

Dover Street Bridge. Number of vessels which 
passea tbrough the draw during the year was as 
lollows: January, 17; March, 82; April , 200 ; May, 
322; June, 392; July, 470; August, 472; September, 
511 ; October, 638 ; November, 460 ; December, 384. 
Total, 3848. 

Meridian Street Bridqe. Number of vessels 
whicli passed through the draw during the year 
was as follows: January, 14; February, 55; March, 
117; April, 137; May, 158; June, 244; July, 275; 
August, 2U6; September, 307; October, 292; No- 
vember, 234 ; December, 198. Total, 2357. 

Chelsea Street Bridge. There were but 14 vessels 
which passed through the draw. 

Mount Washington Aoenue Bridge. The number 
of vessels which passed the draw during the year 
was 10,8(5. 

QUARTERLY REPORTS. 

Quarterly reports were made as follows : 

Superintendent of Health. Expended for the 
qurrcer ending Dec. 31, 1868 : Sweeping and clean- 
ing the streets, removal of ashes, offal, etc., $75,- 
8C8 06. bills against sundry persons have been de- 
posited with the City Treasurer for collection to 
the amount of §16,085 70. Amount paid into the 
Treasury, $3045 35. Number of prisoners conveyed 
from the several Station Houses to City Lock-Up— 
males, 1728; females, 688— total, 2416. 

Weighers and Inspectors of Lighters. Receipts 
for the quarter, for inspection $955 75; expenses 
o± office $24 77; net income, $930 98, which has 
been divided among the incumbents. 

Hay Weigher North Scales. Receipts for the 
quarter, $718 81, three-eights of which, deducting 
expenses, $12 85, amounting to $256 70, have beeu 
paid to the City Treasury. 

Weights and Measures. The receipts during' the 
quarter at the scales for the Northern district 
amounted to $436 33, all of which has been paid 
into the City Treasury. The receipts at the scales 
for the Southern district amounted to $425 21, all 
of which was paid into the City Treasury. 

Superintendent of Streets. Expended for the 
quarter, $123,510 74. Bills to the amount of $13,- 
691 19 were deposited with the City Treasurer for 
collection, and $1768 59 were paid into the Treasury. 

Truant Officers. The annual reports of the Truant 
Officers give the following results: 

Number of cases investigated during the quar- 
ter 3216, old truants previously reported 52, new 
cases 112, number found to be truants 164, aggre- 
gate absences by truancy 673, complained of before 
the Municipal Court as habitual truants 35, on pro- 
bation 11, sentenced to House of Reformation 24, 
complained of as absentees 32, on probation 4, sen- 
tenced to the House of Reformation 28. Before 
Judge of Probate — complaints other than truancy 
10; on probation 2, sentenced to State Reform 
School 4, sentenced to School Ship 3, sentenced to 
Industrial School for Girls 1 . 

ASSIGNMENT OP A HEARING. 

An order of notice was reported for a hearing 
on petition of Milo Whitney for leave to erect a 
steam engine at No. 1057 Washington street, the 
hearing to take place, Feb. 1, 4 P. M. 

ADDITIONAL APPROPRIATIONS FOR THE CHURCH 
STREET DISTRICT. 

The joint special committee on the Church 
Street District made a report, stating that an ad- 
ditional appropriation is now required to carry on 
the work authorized by the City Council. The re- 
port is as follows : 

The appropriations made last year amounted to 
$400,000. - : ' ■ ■• . ■<■ 



The payments up to the present time have been 
as follows: 

To contractors for raising buildings 

and putting in underpinning $231,138 47 

To contractor for gravel filling 62,500 00 

Damages to estates on the line of Col- 
umbus avenue extension 47,194 44 

Estates surrendered, including mort- 
gages 27,617 00 

Lea^e surrendered 500 no 

Removing edge stones, crossings, etc. . 2,781 63 
Labor and material fitting up buildings 1,146 99 
Teaming, fences, lanterns, oil and small 

items 491 13 

Salaries— Commissioners $2,523 27 

Clerk 811 09 

Police, etc 3,17164 

Engineers, including 
expenses 303 17 



Furniture, rent and care of office. 

Printing, stationery, etc 

Expenses of committee 



6,839 17 
208 36 
118 25 
656 17 



Total $381,161 61 

Special drafts in the office of the Audi- 
tor of Accounts to be paid 32,138 00 



$413,329 01 



it will be perceived that only $293,638 47 of the 
above amount has been expended for raising the 
buildings and the grade of the territory. The ex- 
penditure authorized for this purpose by the last 
City Council was $650,000. As two-thirds of the 
work of raising the buildings and filling the terri- 
tory has been performed at the prasent time, there 
appears to be no doubt that the whole will be com- 
pleted within the estimates. 

The amounts paid for estates surrendered to the 
City, and for land taken and damages occasioned 
by the extension of Columbus avenue, and the 
widening of Marion, South Cedar, Piedmont. 
Shawmut, Berlin, and Tennyson streets, and that 
portion of Treinont street which lies within the 
Church Street District, are not to be included, of 
course, within the amount authorized to be ex- 
pended for raising the buildings and the territory 
—that work having been ordered after the esti- 
mates for raising the building and the grade had 
been made. To perform all the work which the 
Committee and the Commissioners are authorized 
to perform, loans will be required probably to the 
amount of a million dollars. 

The estates surrendered can undoubtedly be sold 
for more than the city pays for them; and a con- 
siderable portion of the expense for extending and 
widening streets will be assessed upon the estates 
benefited before they are re-conveyed to the former 
owners. 

The committee would respectfully request the 
passage of the accompanying order, making an 
appropriation of three hundred thousand dollars, 
for the purposes specified. 

jf'or the Committee, 

Francis Richards, Chairman. 

Ordered, That the Treasurer be authorized to 
borrow, under the direction of the Committee on 
Finance, the sum of three hundred thousand dol- 
lars, to be applied to raising the territory and 
buildings on the Church Street District, paying 
for any estates on said district, taken under the 
provisions of Chapter 308, of the Acts of 1867, and 
for damages on account of widening and extend- 
ing streets : said sum to be added to the loan here- 
tofore authorized for the same purpose. 

The order was read twice and passed unani- 
mously. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Alderman White, from the Committee on Li- 
censes, reported in fav^r of granting a license to 
Solomon Aaron to give a sparring exhibition at 
Revere Hall; also, on petition of Tlios. Denny, to 
give a sparring exhibition. 

The Committee also reported in favor of granting 
sundry licenses as innholders. 

The Committee also reported leave to withdraw 
on fifty or sixty applications for licenses as inn- 
holders. 

The reports were severally accepted. 

Alderman James, from the Committee on 
Health, reported that the license of N. Hays, as 
collector of grease and bones, be revoked. Ac-r 
cepted. 



9 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



STREETS IN BOSTON HIGHLANDS. 

A petition was presented from Samuel C.Cobb 
and others, respecting surveys, and laying out 
streets in Boston Highlands. On this petition the 
following order was passed: 

Whereas, His Honor the Mayor, in his inaugu- 
ral address, called the attention of the City Coun- 
cil to the importance of reconveying and laying 
out prospectively into streets and avenues the 
territory in the Boston Highlands now vacant or 
thinly populated, and 

Whereas, a large number of the residents of the 
Boston Highlands have represented that if the 
streets in such territory were properly laid out at 
the present time, the necessity for large expendi- 
tures for that purpose in the future would be 
obviated; it is therefore 

Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor be requested 
to petition the General Court now in session for 
authority to lay out such streets and avenues in 
the Boston Highlands as may be for tbe common 
benefit oi the proprietors of the land taken for the 
purpose and the citv of Boston— the city not to be 
obliged to complete the streets and avenues so laid 
out sooner than they may deem it expedient so to 
do. 

FREE CONCERTS. 

Aldermen Fairbanks and White were appointed 
a committee, to be joined, to make arrangements 
tor free concerts in Music Hall, or elsewhere, the 
expense not to exceed the appropriation already 
made for that purpose. 

MUSICAL FESTIVAL. 

Aldermen White and Fairbanks were appointed 
a committee, to be joined, to consider and report 



upon the part which it is expedient tor tbe City 
Government to take in this proposed Musical Fes- 
tival in this city in June next. 

SUFFOLK STREET DISTRICT. 

The following order was adopted on motion of 
Alderman Talbot: 

Ordered, That a special committee, consisting of 
two on the part of this Board, with such as the 
CommonCouncilmayjoin.be appointed to pro- 
cure plans and estimates for raising the Suffolk 
Street District (so called) and report to the City 
Council upon the expediency of taking said dis- 
trict as provided in chapter 277 oi the acts of the 
year 1868; said committee to have and exercise all 
the powers in relation to the examination of titles 
to property on said district confered by the City 
Council ot 1868 upon the special committee upon 
the subject. 

Aldermen Talbot and Baldwin were appointed on 
the committee. 

BROADWAY EXTENSION. 

Ordered, that the reports and papers in relation 
to the extension of Broadway, be taken from the 
files oflast year and referred to tbe Committee on 
Streets, with instructions to report an order of 
notice for the extension of Broadway from Federal 
street to Albany street, as soon as possible. 

LICENSES TO MINORS. 

An order was adopted authorizing the Mayor 
and Aldermen to make such rules and regulations 
in relation to the licensingof minors, and to grant 
licenses to minors, as they may deem expedient, 
as provided by law. 

Adjourned. 



10 



COMMON COUNCIL 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceeding's of the Common Council, 

JAN. 14, 1869. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Common 
Council was held at 7% o'clock this evening, 
Wm. G. Harris, the President, in the chair. 

PAPERS FROM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

Petitions from the Board of Aldermen were re- 
ferred in concurrence. 

The quarterly reports of city officers and annual 
reports of Superintendents of Bridges were read 
and ordered to be placed on file. 

The Auditor's monthly exhibit, printed City 
Document No. 3, 1869, was also ordered to be 
placed on file. 

The Message from His Honor the Mayor, trans- 
mitting a letter from Hon. John P. Bigelow, in 
which he tenders his resignation of the office of 
Trustee of the Public Library, was referred in con- 
currence, and the following orders were passed in 
concurrence: 

Order authorizing the Mayor and Aldermen, in 
accordance with Sec. 14, Chap. 50, of the General 
Statutes, to make rules and regulations to restrain 
sales by and grant licenses to minors. 

Order requesting his Honor the Mayor to peti- 
tion the General Court for authority to lay out 
such streets and avenues in the Boston Highlands 
as may be for the common benefit of the proprie- 
tors of the lands laid out and the city. 

Messrs. Flanders of Ward Five, Braman of Ward 
Six and Rich of Ward Fourteen were joined to the 
committee to make arrangements for tree concerts 
in Music Hall or elsewhere, at an expense not ex- 
ceeding the appropriation heretofore made there- 
tor. 

Messrs. Leighton of Ward Nine, Flanders of 
Ward Five and Pickering of Ward Fourteen were 
joined to the committee on establishing the sala- 
ries of the city officers. 

Messrs. Richards of Ward Eight, Rogers of Ward 
Fifteen, and Osborn of Ward Six, were joined to 
the committee to procure plans and estimates for 
raising the Suffolk Street District, and report on 
the expediency of taking said District, as provided 
in Chapter 277 of the acts of 1868, with full power 
relative to the examination of titles and property 
in said District. 

Messrs. Denny of Ward Ten, Jacobs of Ward 
Five, and Nelson of Ward Nine, were joined to the 
committee to consider what part it is expedient 
for the City Government to take in the proposed 
Musical Festival in this city in June next. 

On motion of Mr. Nelson of Ward Nine, the 
President ot the Council was added as chairman 
of the Committee. 

The order for an additional loan of $300,000, to be 
appropriated for the Church Street District. 
Printed City Doc. No. 4,1869, was read once, and 
laid over under the rales. 

The orders for the appointment of Joint Stand- 
ing Comm'ttees were adopted, and the President 
announced the Standing Committees and Joint 
Standing Committees on the part of the Common 
Council, as follows: 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE COMMON COUNCIL.. 

Common and Squares— Squires of Wards, Jacobs 
ot Ward 5, Judson of Ward 14, Learnard of Ward 
11 aud Ingalls ot Ward 12. 

Ferries— Richards of Ward 8, Dinsmore of Ward 
2, Ryan of Ward 13. Pote of Ward 1 and Poor of 
Ward 11. 

Fire Department— Tucker of Ward 6, Flanders of 
Ward 5, Dinsmore of Ward 2, Kingsbury of Ward 
15 and Woolley of Ward 1. 

Internal Health— Batchelder of Ward 4,Flynnof 
Ward 7, Hopkins of Ward 10, Ryan of Ward 13, and 
Woods of Ward 12. 

Police— Squires of Ward 8, Kingsbury of Ward 
15, Malone of Ward 2, Tucker of Ward 6, and But- 
ler of Ward 10. 

Streets— Richards of Ward 8, Flynn of Ward 7, 
Rogers of Ward 15, Johnst <>n of Ward 12, and Bond 
of W aid 8. 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Assessors' Department— Leighton of Ward S T 
Gray of Ward 12, Hopkins of Ward 10, Kearny of 
Ward 2, and Talbot of Ward 4. 

Bathing— Woolley of Ward 1, Crowley of Ward 
7, Bramay of Ward 6, Vannevar of Ward 8, and 
Kingsbury of Ward 15. 

Claims— Wadsworth of Ward 4, Jacobs of Ward 
5, Butler of Ward 10, Talbot of Ward 4, and Pear- 
son of Ward 13. 

Engineer's Deoartment— Wadsworth of Ward 4, 
Malone of W ard 2, and Hall of Ward 1. 

Fire Alarms— Belknap of Ward 3, Lucas of Ward 
7. and Woods of Ward 12. 

Fuel— Pickering of Ward 14, Cole of Ward 5, and 
Bond of Ward 8. 

Harbor— Denny of Ward ft), Belknap of Ward 3, 
and Young of Ward 1. 

City Hospital— Jenks of Ward 3, Rogers of Ward 
15, and Frost of Ward 9. 

Institutions at South Boston and Deer Island — 
Woolley of Ward 1, Keany of Ward 2, Keith of 
Ward 15, Butler of Ward 10, and Learnard of 
Ward 11. 

Ordinances— Osborn of Ward 6, Denny of Ward 

10, Jacobs of Ward 5, Ingalls of Ward 12, and Rich 
of Ward 14. 

Overseers of Poor and Temporary Home— Nelson 
ot Ward 9, Jenks ot Ward 3, and Richards of Ward 
8. 

Public Buildings— Keith of Ward 15, Emerson of 
Ward 6, Wells ef Ward 3, Leighton ot Ward 9, and 
Gray of Ward 12. 

Public Instruction— President of Common Coun- 
cil, ex-officio, Osborn of Ward 6, Snow of Ward 

11, Hobbs of Ward 14, and Willuns of Ward 9. 
Public Lands— Squires ol Ward 8, Wells of Ward 

3, Poor of Ward 11, Pickering of Ward 14, and Hall 
of Ward 1. 

Printing— Nelson of Ward 9, Gay ofWird 10, and 
Conant of Ward 15. 

Public Library— Belknap of Ward 3, Batchelder 
of Ward 4, Johnston of Ward 12, Mullane of Ward 
13, and Gay of Ward 10. 

Surveyor's Department— Wadsworth ot Ward 

4, Doherty of Ward 2, and Cole of Ward 7. 
Treasury Department— Gray of Ward 12, Davis 

of Ward 13, and Noyes of Ward 5. 

Water — Young of Ward 1, Emerson of Ward 6, 
Noyes of Waid5, Going of Ward 3, and Daniels 
of Ward 4. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

The orders establishing rules and orders of the 
Common Council were passed. 

The iomt rules and orders were considered. 

Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteen moved, as amend- 
ments after sec. 11 page 44 of the printed rules, 
provisions requiring eacb member, on presenting 
petitions, memorials, &c., to indorse the subject- 
matter of the same on top, with his name below, 
and make a brief statement of the same; also sim- 
ilar provisions on the offering of orders, with the 
name indorsed of the person offering them. These 
amendments were adopted. 

Mr. Keith moved a further amendment, to strike 
out "or indorsement" in section 11, pending which 

Mr. Jacobs of Ward Five moved a reference of 
the subject to the Committee on Ordinances, which 
was modified subsequently to a reference back to 
the Joint Committee on Rules and Orders, which 
was carried. 

COMMUNICATIONS. 

A communication was received from the School 
Committee, requesting the City Council to furnish 
the Committee with a suitable hall for the accom- 
modation of the Committee and the City Council 
and others in which to witness exhibitions of deaf 
mutes from the institutions at Hartford and at 
Northampton. Referred to the Committee on 
Public It-struction. 

Mr. Keith presented a communication from the 
Commissioners on the annexation of Dorchester, 
and an order therewith appropriating $1000 for 
surveys, maps and plans in relation to such annex- 
ation. Refered to Committee on Finance. 

REFERENCE OF MAYOR'S ADDRESS. 

Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteen, from the Joint Spec- 
ial Committee, appointed to report what disposi- 
tion should be made of the various topics em- 
braced in the Mayor's Inaugural Address, recom- 
mended the passage of the accompanying orders : 

Ordered, That so much ot the Mayor's Address 
as relates to the expediency of purchasing land 



JANUARY 14 



18 6 9 



11 



adjoining the Chestnut Hill reservoir, for a public 
park, tie referred to the Joint Standing Commit- 
tee on Water ; so much as relates to the enlarge- 
ment ol the Public Library building, to the Joint 
Standing Committee on the Public Library; so 
much as relates to the enlaigement of the City 
Hospital building, to the Joint Standing Commit- 
tee on the City Hospital ; so much as relates to the 
institutions at South Boston and Deer Island, to 
the Joint Standing Committee on Public Institu- 
tions; so much as relates to the petition to the 
General Court to provide against the erection of 
unsafe buildings, to the Committee on Public 
Buildings. 

Ordered, That so much of the Mayor's address as 
relates to the petition to ttie General Court for a 
change in the boundary line between the city of 
Boston and the town of Brookline, be referred to a 
joint special committee. 

The orders were adopted. 

Messrs. Keith of Ward Fifteen, Osborn of Ward 
Six and Metering of Ward Fourteen were ap- 
pointed the Committee under the last order. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

D. MeB. Thaxter and others, in favor of the ap- 
pointment of Charles I. Craibe as Superintendent 
of Federal street bridge. 

P. M. Fbss for said office, said petition being ac- 
companied by a recommendation from Charles H. 
Biffiler and others in aid ot the same. 

Severally referred to the Committee on nomina- 
tion, of Superintendents of Bridges. 

ORDERS PASSED. 

On motion of Mr. Gray of Ward Twelve, that 
the several Committees of the City Council re- 
sume the unfinished business of the last year, 
which is appropriate to the said Committees. 



On motion of Mr. Dinsmore of Ward Two, it was 
ordered that a committee be appointed, to be join- 
ed, to nominate a Harbor Master. Messrs. l)ins- 
more of Ward Two, Belknap of Ward Three, and 
Cole of Ward Five, were appointed the said com- 
mittee. 

On motion of Mr. Lucas of Ward Seven, it was 
ordered that a committee be appointed, to be join- 
ed, to nominate a Superintendent of Fire Alarms. 
Messrs. Lucas of Ward Seven, Vannevar of Ward 
Eight, and Hall of Ward One, were appointed the 
committee. 

Mr. Snow of Ward Eleven, moved as amend- 
ment to the Rules and Orders of the Common 
Council, a provision in Section 1, that after calling 
the Council to order the President shall first cause 
"the minutes to be read, if called for by any mem- 
ber, but not otherwise." 

Mr. Snow said he proposed the amendment for 
the reason that the reading of the minutes was 
invariably dispensed with on motion of some 
member. 

On motion of Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteen, the 
amendment was referred to the Committee of 
the Common Council on Bules and Orders. 

CHAIRMEN OF COMMITTEES. 

Mr. Denny, from the Committee on Finance, an- 
nounced that the Committee had made choice ot 
Francis A. Osborn of Ward Six as Chairman of the 
Committee. 

Mr. Flanders, of the Committee on Accounts, 
announced that the Committee had made choice of 
Edward E. Batchelder of Ward Four as their 
Chairman. 

Adjourned. 



13 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 
JAN. 18, 1869. 



The regular weekly meetiug of the Board of Al- 
dermen was held at 4 o'clock this afternoon, His 
Honor Mayor Shurtleff in the chair. 

JURORS DRAWN. 

Six traverse jurors were drawn for the Superior 
Court, second 'session, and seven were drawn for 
the first session of the same Court. 

APPOINTMENTS CONFIRMED. 

E. W. Buswell, for duty at Horticultural Hall, 
special police officer without pay. 
Samuel J. Crockett, as an undertaker. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

Thomas Richardson, for a heariug on the sub- 
ject of damages to his estate in Federal street. 
' Wm. Clark and others, that Windsor street be 
laid out as a public street. 

Wm. Clark and others, that Weston street be ac- 
cepted as a public street. 

John F. Pray and others, that AUen street be ex- 
tended to Charles street. 

Lucius Slade and others, that Chambers street 
be extended to Spring street. 

Severally referred to tbe Committee on Streets. 

George D. Lord, for abatement of sidewalk as- 
sessment on Princeton street. 

Stafford & Presbey, for the grade of Grove Hall 
avenue, near Winthrop street. 

Cbauncy Page, to be paid for damages caused by 
change oi grade in First street. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Paving. 

James S. Percival and others, for a lamp at cor- 
ner of Holland place and Tyler street. Referred 
to Committee on Lamps. 

Engine Company No. 9, for an alteration in their 
engine house. Referred to Committee on Public 
Buildings. 

John U. Blaisdell, for leave to apply liquid fuel 
as a kindling agent under steam lire engines. Re- 
ferred to Committee on Fire Department. 

W. H. Fitzpatrick & Co., for a license as auction- 
eers. Referred to Committee on Licenses. 

Charles R. McLean, that the ballots for Alder- 
menin Ward One maybe recounted. Referred to 
Aldermen White and Talbot. 

NOTICES OF INTENTION TO BUILD. 

N. S. Smith, corner of D and Fourth streets; 
Stafford & Presbrey, corner of Grove Hall avenue 
and Winthrop streets; A. & J. McLaren, 21 Lex- 
ington street; S. F. Towle, corner of East Spring, 
field and Washington street 1 - ; J. & W. C. Down- 
ing, Saratoga, between Brooks and Putnam 
streets; J. E. & N. Brown, 114 Summer street, 
corner of High street ; Mortimer F. Downing, 682 
and 684 F ederal street ; Stephenson & Emory, 10 
and 12 Lexington street; C. & G. Barker, 48 and 50 
Beverly street; W. A. & S. G. Low, 2 Harrison 
avenue ; Thomas A. Foster, Monmouth street; 
William Goldsmith, Prentiss, next to ccrner of 
Tremont street ; J. E. & N. Brown, 7 High 
street ; Tollman & Huncing, 8 Avery street ; 
W.W. &J. F.Bennett, Liverpool, near Decatur 
street; W. H.Dodge, 92 Broadway; Batchelder 
Brothers, Broad street, between Pearl and Pur- 
chase streets ; A McCrillis, Liverpool street be- 
tween Decatur street and Central square; J. W. 
Dean, 24 and 26 Williams street; C. K. Kirby. 230 
and 249 Tremont street ; Mark Dowling, 37 West 
street; John Towne & Son, North Russell street. 
Severally referred to the Committee on Streets. 

ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Annual reports were made as follows : 

SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 

The report of the Superintendent of Streets 
gives in detail the expenditures in the several 
streets of the city. The amount expended by the 
paving department during the municipal year, 1868, 



was $407,053 89. This amount was expended for pav- 
ing, repaying;, grading, repairs of streets, remov- 
ing and levelling snow and for grade damages, &c. 
These expenditures in more than one hundred 
streets and squares in tbe city proper amounted 
to $210,027 81. In twenty-three streets in South 
Boston, tne expenditures amounted to $00,557 60. 
In seventeen streets in East Boston, the amount 
was $24,598 66. In thirty-seven streets at the High- 
lands, the amount was $18,045 45. Incidentals, 
$61,824 37 ; grade damages $2000. 

The total amount appropriated for paving, &c., 
the present financial year, 1868-69, was $375,000; 
exoenditures of the present financial year to Jan. 
J, 1869, was $365,808 06; balance of appropriations 
unexpended Jan. 1, 1869, $9191 94. The amount of 
bills lor edgestones, constructing and repairs of 
sidewalks, lodged with the City Treasurer during 
the year for collection, was $19,056 07. Amount 
paid into the City Treasury during the same period, 
credited to the Paving Department, was $6380 25. 

In addition to the appropriations made by the 
City Council to the ordiuary expenses of the pav- 
ing department, special appropriations were made 
in 1866, '67 and '68, for the following objects, viz: 
Construction of a new bridge, on Albany street, 
over the tracks of the Boston & Albany Railroad, 
for tbe extension of Albany street from Troy street 
to Dover street, for grading and gravelling Albany 
street, south of Dover street, for raising and grad- 
ing Dedham street, between Shawmut avenue and 
Tremont street, and for raising and grading Shaw- 
mut avenue and Ruggles street in Roxbury. The 
amount expended on these works was as follows : 

Albany street bridge $24,657 1 1; extension of Al- 
bany street $3079 95; Albany street south of Dover 
street $3728 25; Dedham street $660; Shawmut 
avenue and Ruggles street $31,801 30 ; Oliver street 
$30,897 45. 

A statement is given ot the several locations 
granted by the Board of Aldermen to Freight Rail- 
way corporations, with the route of tracks and the 
date of orders, also of grants to the Metropolitan 
Railroad Company. 

Atlantic Avenue. In relation to this proposed 
avenue, the Superintendent says the plans and 
specifications are now being prepared by the City 
Engineer, and the work will be commenced at au 
early day. The report proceeds : 

As this street will be subjected to heavy travel 
and probably occupied to some extent by freight 
railroad tracks, it is important that it should be 
built in the most thorough and substantial man- 
ner. If made the depository of ashes, street scrap- 
ings, and refuse matter, it will not be solid, but 
will continue to settle tor years to come ; the pave- 
ment will become uneven, badly rutted, and re- 
quire irequent relaying. As the Government has 
already been asked to allow the street to be used 
as a place of deposit for ashes, &c, I take this 
opportunity to respectfully protest against a pro- 
ceeding which will result to the disadvantage ot 
the city. 

Operations in Fort Hill have been held in abey- 
ance for a suitaole place to deposit the earth. 
The building of Atlantic avenue will supply the 
required want, and the material in the hill being a 
hard clay, will make the best of filling and form a 
solid foundation for the roadway. 

Roxbury. The annexation of Roxbury to Boston 
increased the expenses of the paving department 
to a considerable amount, and added' to the duties 
of the Superintendent. The work done in that 
section for the past year was much needed, and 
more will be required the coming season. An ac- 
curate survey of Roxbury should be made without 
delay for thepurpose of defining the street lines 
and establishing a thorough system of grades. 

Street Pavements. The best pavement for a 
street must be determined by the locality and the 
amount of travel to which it is to be exposed. 
The pavements now in use m this city are the 
round or cobble stone pavements, the cubical 
block pavement, composed ol small granite or trap 
rock blocks, and the wood pavement. The round 
or cobble stone pavement, with which most of our 
business streets are paved, is a rou^h, noisy and 
dirty pavement, badly adapted for the carriage of 
heavy loads, and giving a very insecure foothold. 
Its only recommendation is its cheapness. No 
new streets should be paved with this material. 
When replaced on the old streets by a better arti- 
cle, the stone can be broken and used to macada- 
mize the roads in the suburbs of the city. 

The cubical block pavement, composed of small 
granite or trap rock blocks, is well adapted lor 



JANUARY 



18 



18 6 9 



13 



those streets most expose 1 to heavy travel. It is 
so even as to allow the carriage ot heavy loads 
with comparative ease, and at the same time is not 
slippery. Alter several years' trial its durability is 
unquestioned. 

YVood pavement was tried in this city several 
years ago and abandoned as worthless. It has 
been used in Chicago and other Western cities, 
and given general satisfaction. In those cities the 
S'leets are wide, and the travel is distributed over 
a large surface. In this city it was put down in 
narrow streets, exposed to the heaviest travel. 
On Exchange street, when the wood pavement 
was taken up, granite blocks eighteen inches long 
and six inches wide were laid down. In a lew 
years these proved a failure, and the street was re- 
paved with small granite blocks, which after two 
years' use are minh worn, and plainly show how 
severe is ihe test to which they are exposed. 

lu the light of these circumstances, it is not sur- 
prising that the wood pavement should have fail- 
ed in localities for which it was not adapted. For 
the streets at the South End and the Back Bay ter- 
ritory, where the travel is comparatively light, 
and lor those in the vicinity of public buildings, 
where freedom from noise is an indispensable re- 
quisite, the wood pavement is most admirably 
adapted. I am confident in those localities it will 
give entire satisfaction and prove a complete suc- 
cess. 

Macadamized streets in the city proper have 
proved a failure. When properly constructed, 
they cost as much as those paved with the best 
stone pavement, and the expense of keeping them 
in repair is three times as great. Roadways of this 
kind are excellent in the country, or in the suburbs 
ol the city, where the material for constructing 
and repairing; them is easily obtained, but to main- 
tain them in frequented thoroughfares in the heart 
ot the city requires an extravagant expenditure of 
money. 

The report was ordered to be printed. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF FEDERAL STREET BRIDGE. 

The report of the Superintendent of the Federal 
stieet bridge states that the number of vessels 
which passed through the draw of that bridge in 

1868 was 8522. 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES — SOUTHERN 
DISTRICT. 

The report of J. D. Cadogan, sealer of weights 
and measures for the Southern District, recom- 
mends the abolishing of spring balances princi- 
pally used in weighing fish, as liable to get out of 
order. The report states that the grocers and oth- 
ers who pell by weights and measures are not 
chargeable witn the practices complained of in 
New York. 

COMMON COUNCIL PAPERS. 

Petitions from the Council were referred in con- 
currence. 

The order to recommit report adopting Joint 
Rules and Orders, was passed in concurrence. 

The report ot committee on reference of the sev- 
eral portions of the Mayor's Address was adopted 
in concurrence. Under the last order, relating to 
the boundary line between Boston and Brookline, 
Aldermen Bradlee and Talbot were joined to the 
Committee of the Common Council. 

Request of Sub-Committee for a suitable room 
for the exhibition of Deaf Mutes. Referred, in 
concurrence. 

Request of Dorchester Commissioners for an ap- 
propriation of $1000 for sewers, plans, &c. Re- 
ferred, in concurrence. 

The several orders from the Council were passed 
in concurrence, as follows: 

Orders for Joint Standing Committees to resume 
unfinished business. 

Order for Joint Committee to nominate Harbor 
Master, to which Aldermen Bawes and Van Nos- 
trand were joined. 

Order for Joint Committee to nominate Superin- 
tendent of Fire Alarms, to which Aldermen Rich- 
ards and Hawes were ioined. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Alderman "White, from the Committee on Li- 
censes, reported in favor of licenses to A. Heckin 
to give a sparring exhibition, and to sundry per- 
sons as innholders, victuallers, intelligence offices, 
wagon stands and dealers in junk and second-hand 
articles. Severally accepted. 



Also leave to withdraw on petitions of Thomas 
F. Brady, for license as a common victualler, A. & 
S. Whitebone as pawn brokers, and Henry J, 
Lefavrc, as an innholder. Severally accepted. 

Alderman James, irovn the Committee on Pav- 
ing, reported reference to Committee on Suffolk 
Street District, on the several petitions of Mary A. 
Wcllbrook, Eben Morton, and Timothy Connelly. 
Accepted. 

Alderman James, from the Committee on Sala- 
ries, made a report in print, establishing the sala- 
ries of the several city officers during the ensuing 
year, and recommending ttao passage of the ac- 
companying orde'S. The only changes made in 
the amounts paid last year are as follows: To the 
City Clerk, for clerk hire, an increase of six hun- 
dred dollars; to the Clerk of Committees, an in- 
crease of five hundred dollars; to the City Physi- 
cian, fifteen hundred dollars, a decrease of five 
hundred dollars. 

The report was laid on the table. 

Alderman White submitted the Annual Report 
of the Trustees of the Mount Hope Cemetery. 
Ascepted and sent down. 

Alderman White, from the Committee on Health, 
made a report revoking the licenses of Peter 
Holmes of Cambridge and Patrick Higgins of 
Somerville, as collectors of grease and bones. Ac- 
cepted. 

Alderman White, from the Committee on Li- 
censes, on the order relating to l'eenses to minors, 
reported the rules and regulations governing li- 
censed minors adopted last year, with several 
amendments. The amended provisions were as 
follows: 

3. All licenses shall specify the articles to be 
sold or the business to be pursued, and the licenses 
issued to bootblacks shall contain the places as- 
signed therefor. 

4. Each minor licensed by the Board of Alder- 
men shall at all times, while engaged in the busi- 
ness for which he is licensed, wear a leather badge 
upon his hat or cap, with the word "Licensed" 
and the number of his license in polished letters 
fastened thereon. A neglect or refusal so to do 
will work a forfeiture of said license. 

8. Each minor so licensed shall exhibit his li- 
cense to any officer of the city, for inspection, 
when required so to do, and the same shall not be 
transferred, exchanged, borrowed or lent, on pain 
of forieiture thereof! 

The rules and regulations, as amended, were 
adopted. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on Streets, 
reported an order revising the assessment of bet- 
terments on Bowker, Torrey & Co. for the widen- 
ing of Bowker street. Adopted. 

Alderman Van Nostrand, from the Committee 
on Assessors' Department, reported an order di- 
recting the Treasurer to refund to Elizabeth Noyes 
a tax assessed in 18G7, on an estate in South Bos- 
ton, with the costs and expenses in the collection 
ot said tax, amounting to $37, to be charged to the 
account of taxes of 1807. The order was passed. 

HEARINGS ON ORDERS OF NOTICE. 

On petition for a change of name of Shoe and 
Leather street to John street. Hearing Monuay, 
Feb. 1. 4 o'clock P. M. 

On an order declaring the building known as 
the Eastern Exchange, corner of Causeway and 
Canal streets, to be dangerous and a nuisance, 
requiring to be rebuilt or torn down. Hearing 
Monday, Jan. 25, 4 P. M. 

On petition of Eames & Tucker, for leave to 
build a stable on Brookline street. Hearing on 
Monday, Feb. 25, 4 P. M. 

ORDERS PASSED. 

Order that the Chief of Police be and he is here- 
by directed to notify the owner of estate numbered 
245 Tremont street, to remove within ten days the 
stone steps placed outside of said estate, within 
the line of said Tremont street, and in default 
thereof the Superintendent of Streets is hereby di- 
rected to cause said steps to be removed at the 
expense of the owner thereof. 

Order that the Chairman of the Committees on 
Streets, Paving and Sewers be appointed a special 
committee, with full powers to continue the nego- 
tiations which were commenced last year between 
the City of Boston and the Boston & Albany Rail- 
road Company, in relation to the streets and 
bridges adjacent to and across the tracks of said 
Corporation. 



14 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



Order that the Superintendent of Streets be au - 
thorized, under the direction of the Committee on 
Paving, to grant permits for moving buildings 
through the public streets of the city. 

Order that the Superintendent of Streets be au- 
thorized, under the direction of the Committee on 
Paving, to number or renumber any street, court 
or place within the city limits, whenever in the 
opinion of said committee the public convenience 
will be promoted thereby. 

Order that the Superintendent of Streets be au- 
thorized to grant permits to open the streets in ac- 
cordance with the ninth and tenth sections of the 
ordinance relating to streets. 

Order that the Superintendent of Streets be au- 
thorized, under the direction of the Committee on 
Paving, to contract from time to time for the pur- 
chase and exchange of horses, the supply of hay, 
grain, paving stones, gravel, and other materials 
required for the operations of the Paving Depart- 
ment during the present municipal year. 

Order that the Superintendent of Health be au- 
thorized during the present municipal year to 
make contracts, subject to the supervision ot the 
Committee on Health, for the purchase of such 
quantities of hay and grain, and for such horses as 
his department may from time to time require, 
also for such material as shall be required for the 
use of this department. 

Order that the Committee on Ordinances consid- 
er and report upon the expediency of amending 
the ordinance concerning the assessment and col- 
lection of taxes, to provide ior the election of 
three additional first assistant assessors, and re- 
lieving the assessors from any specified duty upon 
the streets. 

Order that the Joint Standing Committee on 
Ordinances be authorized to prepare and print a 
digest of the City Ordinances and the General and 
Special Statutes relating to the city of Boston, the 
expense thereof to be charged to the appropriation 
for incidental expenses. 

Order that the list of jurors in this city, who are 
qualified to serve in the several courts of the 
County of Suffolk, be revised by this Board, and 
be posted in the City Hall and Court House, and 
be thereafterwards submitted to the Common 
Council for revision and acceptance, pursuant to 
law. 

Order that the several standing committees of 
this Board resume the unfinished business of the 
last year, which is appropriate to said committees. 

Order that the Committee on Laying out and 
Widening Streets be and they hereby are author- 
ized to sell at public auction the estate on the cor- 
ner of Avon place and Chauncy street, belonging 



to the city, containing 2031 square feet, and that 
the proceeds from the same be paid into the City 
Treasury. The said estate is the portion left alter 
the extension of Avon place from the estate pur- 
chased by the city of Messrs. Jordau, Marsh & Co. 

Order that the East Boston Ferry Co. be directed 
to run one boat between the landings of the former 
People's Ferry Co. from 6 o'clock A. M., daily, to 
12 o'clock, midnight. 

Order that the Board establish the grade of New- 
man street, as shown on a plan made by the City 
Surveyor, dated .Ian. 1, 1809, approved by the Com- 
mittee on Paving, and deposited in the office of 
said City Surveyor. 

Order that His Honor the Mayor be requested to 
petition the Legislature for an amendment to the 
city charier, authorizing the City Clerk to appoint 
a deputy or assistant city clerk. 

Order that the Committee en Common and Pub- 
lic Squares consider the expediency of putting in 
proper order for use as a playground for baseball 
and other games the lot of land conveyed to the 
city by the Boston Water Power Co. in 1865. 

In explanation of this order, Alderman Talbot 
stated that the playing ot base ball on the Com- 
mon was objectionable on several accounts, partic- 
ularly for tlie reason that the grass was entirely 
destroyed on the parade ground where these games 
were played. It was believed that the lot to which 
the order referred would be convenient for the 
purpose, and not so far away as to be difficult of 
access. 

Order that a special committee be appointed, 
consisting of two members of the Board of Alder- 
men, with such as the Common Council may join, 
who shall, in consultation with the Mayor, repre- 
sent the city of Boston before committees ot the 
General Court in all matters pertaining to the 
City Government. 

Aldermen Bradlee and Talbot were appointed on 
the committee. 

CELEBRATION OF FOURTH OF JULY. 

On motion of Alderman White, it was ordered, 
that a committee of five on the part of the Board 
ot Aldermen, with such as the Common Council 
may join, be appointed to make suitable arrange- 
ments for the celebration of the ninety-third anni- 
versary of American Independence, tne expense 
thereof not to exceed $25,000. 

Aldermen White, Richards, James, Fairbanks 
and Bradlee were appointed on the part of the 
Board of Aldermen. 

Adjourned. 



15 



COMMON COUNCIL 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 

JAN. 21, 1869. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Common 
Council was held at iy 2 o'clock tliis evening, Win. 
G. Harris, the .President, presiding. 

PAPERS FROM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

Petitions from the Board of Aldermen were re- 
ferred in concurrence. 

The annual report of Superintendent of Federal 
Street Bridge, and annual report of Trustees of 
Mount Hope Cemetery were severally ordered to 
be placed on file. 

On the order appointing a committee to repre- 
sent the city before committees of the General 
Court, in all matters pertaining to the City Gov- 
ernment, after tbe adoption ol the same, Messrs. 
Ingalls ot Ward Twelve, Hobbs of Ward Fourteen, 
and Snow of Ward Eleven, were joined od the part 
of the Common Council. 

The order for the Committee on Ordinances to 
consider the expediency of amending the ordi- 
nance concerning the assessment of taxes, by pro- 
viding for the election of three additional first as- 
sistant assessors, and relieving assessors from 
duty on streets, was referred to the Committee on 
the Assessors' Department. 

Tbe order appointing a committee to make ar- 
rangements for the celebration of the 4th of July 
next, at an expense not exceeding $25,000, was 
laid on the table, on motion of Mr. Wadsworth of 
Ward Four. 

The following oiders were passed in concur- 
rence: 

Order authorizing the sale of tbe city's estate at 
the corner of Avon place and Chauncy street. 

Order authorizing the tax and expense of collect- 
ing the same on the estate of Elizabeth Hayes to be 
refunded. 

Order requesting tbe Mayor to petition the Leg- 
islature for an amendment to the charter, author- 
izing the City Clerk to appoint a deputy or assist- 
ant city clerk. 

Order authorizing the Committee on Ordinances 
to ]>ropose and print a digest of the ordinances 
and law relating to the city. 

The reference to the Committee on the Suffolk 
Street District, on the several petitions of Mary A. 
Wellbrook, Eben Morton, and Timothy Connelly, 
was accepted in concurrence, unanimously. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

The order for an additional loan ot $300,000, to be 
appropriated tor the Church Street District, was 
passed in concurrence. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

Manson & Peterson, Samuel Hall and fortv-four 
others, individuals and business firms in East Bos- 
ton, National Dock and Warehouse Co., Boston & 
Albany Railroad Co. and fifty-two mercantile firms 
in Boston, that the city would purchase the prop- 
erty of the East Boston Ferry Company. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Ferries. 

R. H. Eddy and others, for a hearina: in relation 
to tbe obstruction of light to their estates in fill- 
ing Tremont street, lieferred to the Committee 
on the Church Street District. 

RESIGNATION AND APPOINTMENT. 

Mr. Richards of Ward Eight was excused from 
serving on the Committee on Ferries, and Mr. Hall 
of W ard One was appointed to fill the vacancy. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Mr. Hobbs of Ward Fourteen, from the Com- 
mittees to nominate Trustees of the City Hospi- 
tal, made a report, recommending the following 
named persons : 

Board ol Aldermen— Newton Talbot. 

Common Council — Samuel T. Snow, Thomas L. 
Jenks. 

At large— Jonas Ball, Wm. A. Kust. 



It was voted to proceed to an election of Trus- 
tees of the City Hospital. 

Messrs. Braman of Ward Six, Mullane of Ward 
Two, and Gay of Ward Ten were appointed a com- 
mittee to receive, sort and count the votes. 

The Committee reported as follows : 

Whole number of votes 51 

Necessary to a choice 26 

Newton Talbot 51 

Samuel T. Snow 50 

Edward E. Batchelder 29 

Thomas L. Jenks 23 

Jonas Ball 50 

Theodore Metcalf. 32 

William A. Kust 18 

Samuel Bice 1 

Alderman Newton Talbot, Samuel T. Snow and 
Edward E. Batchelder of the Common Council, Jo- 
nas Ball and Theodore Metcalf, at large, were de- 
clared to be elected, on the part of tbe Common 
Council. 

Mr. Osborn of Ward Six, from the Committee on 
Finance, to whom was referred the communica- 
tion of the Commissioners on the Annexation of 
Dorchester, asking for an appropriation ot $1000 
to defray the expenses of such surveys, plans, &c, 
as they may require, reported the following 
order: 

Ordered, trat the Commissioners on the Annex- 
ation of Dorohester to Boston, be authorized to 
expend, under the direction of the City Surveyor, 
a sum not exceeding $1000 for such surveys, plans 
and maps as they may require in tbe execution ot 
the order ol the City Council, December 22, 18U8, 
said amount to be charged to the appropriation for 
'• Engineers' and Surveyors' Department," and that 
the Auditor of Accounts be and he is hereby au- 
thorized to transfer lor the accomplishment of the 
above object, from tbe Reserved Fund to the ap- 
propriation for Engineer's and Surveyor's Depart- 
ment, the sum of one thousand dollars. 

The order was read once and ordered to a second 
reading. 

Mr. Tucker of Ward Six, from the special com- 
mittee to whom was referred the order to amend 
the first section of the Rules and Orders of the 
Common Council, so that tne minutes of the pre- 
ceding meeting shall not be read unless called for, 
reported that in their opinion the proposed amend- 
in ent is unnecessary and ought not to be adopted. 

The report was accepted. 

Mr. Wilkins of Ward Nine moved the indefinite 
postponement of the order. 

Mr. Snow of Ward Eleven, who originally intro- 
duced the order, explained that his reason for do- 
ing so was to avoid the necessity for the constant 
repetition, at the beginning of each session, of the 
motion to dispense with the reading ot the rec- 
ords, — especially as each member had the journal 
and a full report of the proceedings of the Com- 
mon Council before him. 

Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteen inquired if the in- 
definite postponement did not carry the wnole 
subject of the rules and orders with it. 

The Chair replied that it did not, for this was an 
order in amendment of the rules, after they had 
been adopted, and the motion only affected this 
order. 

The motion for indefinite postponement was car- 
ried. 

Mr.Tucker ; from the Special Committee to wdiom 
was recommitted the report on joint rules and or- 
ders for the government of the City Council, with 
certain amendments in relation to the presenta- 
tion of petitions, reports, orders, &c, made a re- 
port, in which they state that in their opinion the 
proposed amendments, if adopted, would inter- 
fere with the present highly satisfactory system ot 
tbe recording officers ot the two branches, with- 
out giving any compensating advantages. They 
therefore recommend the passage of tbe order ac- 
companying their original report. 

The report of tbe Committee was accepted, and 
the question recurring on the adoption of the 
amendment of Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteen, to 
strike out the words "or indorsement," in sec. 11, 
page 44, of the printed rules, the amendment was 
lost. 

Mr. Keith made some remarks on the subject of 
indorsement of petitions, saying that the Commit- 
mittee did not state what the' highly satisfactory 
system of the recording officers of the two branches, 
commended by them, is. The amend nents pro- 
posed by him were in accordance with the rules of 



JANUARY 21 



18 9 



16 



legislative l>odies,l)oth in Congress and in our own 
State Legislature, and in his view it would be a 
great convenience in ascertaining easily what the 
characters of the various papers are. He did not 
know what system the clerk of tne other branch 
had which he wished to adhere to, hut was satis- 
fied that the adoption of the amendment he had 
introduced would prove to be beneficial. 

Mr. Tucker, of the committee, said that on a 
consideration of tbe subject, and consultation 
with the clerks, they were satisfied that it would 
save trouble to let the matter remain as it is. On 
one order of the gentleman, the clerk was 
ohligecl to turn the paper over and indorse it on 
the inside. 

Mr. Osborn of Ward Six said it would be shown 
hy the records of the last meeting, that the amend- 
ments of the gentleman from Ward Filteen were 
adopted. He agreed with thai gentleman that 
there should be some indorsement on the petition 
and orders presented, and suggested that in place 
of making it upon the upper part of the paper, it 
might be made upon the lower fold of the docu- 
ment, so as not to interfere with the system of the 
Clerk in making his indorsement. 

Mr. Keith stating that he would accept that as 
an amendment, Mr. Osborn submitted an amend- 
ment to that effect. 

Mr. Wadsworth of Ward Four was of the belief 
that the advantage advocated might he gained by 
the member's stating the substance of the petition 
or ortlei, without an indorsement on the paper. 

Mr. Ingalls of Ward Twelve thought the sug- 
gestion of the gentleman might he of importance 
if the President could carry the statement in his 
mind, in putting the question on such matters. 
He had, heretofore, been surprised at the style of 
procedure, in the Council, in this matter, and be- 
lieved that if any changes could beneficially he 
made they ought to be adopted. He stated that by 
the present method members had frequently to 
vote npon orders, necessarily knowing very little 
of their purport, 

Mr. Jenks of Ward Three moved that the report 
be recommitted, which was carried, by a vote of 
25 to 19. Tbe recommittal took with it the 
amendments ot Mr. Osborn, relating to the in- 
dorsement of papers, which, at the request of the 
President, had been reduced to writing. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward Seven offered an order that 
the Committee on Public Buildings be authorized 
to purchase a lot of land in South Boston and pro- 
cure plans and estimates for a Hook and Ladder 
house, the cost of such land not to exceed $20,000, 
and that the Treasurer be authorized to borrow the 
money for that puroose. On his motion the order 
was referred to the Committee on Public Build- 
ings. 

Mr. Hobbs of Ward Fourteen offered an order that 
the Committee on Public Buildings be authorized 
to purchase a lot ot land at the corner of Warren 
and Dudley streets, owned by Henry H. Walker 
and measuring 7026 feet, for a location for Hook 
and Ladder Company No. 4. and a Ward Boom for 
Ward Fourteen, at a cost not exceeding $10,000, 
and that the Treasurer be authorized to borrow 



the money therefor. He moved its reference to the 
Committee on Fire Department. 

Mr. Jenks ot Ward Three wished to know it this 
was the same lot of land which went up from 80 
cents to $1 25 per foot, in the course of a few days, 
a while ago, when it was found that the city wished 
to purchase it. 

Mr. Hohbs said he had never heard of any such 
thing. 

The reference was carried as proposed. 

Mr. Hall of Ward One off'eied an order that the 
Chief Engineer of the Fire Department be request- 
ed to communicate to the City Council his opin- 
ion as to the necessity of having two fire engineers 
in Ward One. 

Mr. Ingalls of Ward Twelve moved to amend by 
an additional request whether two engineers of 
the Fire Department are not necessary also in 
South Boston. 

Mr. Hall, in advocacy of his order, said that seri- 
ous results had nearly followed Irom fires in Ward 
One, through want of another engineer, and he 
did not wish this inquiry embarrassed by amend- 
ments. 

Mr. Ingalls replied that he had been requested 
to offer a similar order relative to South Boston, 
and proposed the amendment, without intending 
to embarrass the passage of the order, s'rnply as a 
means of obtaining the information which was de- 
sired. 

The amendment was accepted. 

Considerable debate followed relative to the ap- 
propriate reference of such an order, and the 
means ot obtaining information from the heads of 
departments. 

The order was disposed of by its reference to the 
Committee on Fire Department, on motion of Mr., 
Denny of Ward Ten, who argued that the order 
should take the usual course ot going to a com- 
mittee, and that the precedent of obtaining an. 
opinion directly from one of the heads of depart- 
ments should not he set. 

Mr. Hopkins of Ward Ten offered an order that 
the Mayor he requested to appoint the members of 
the City Council special officers without pay, and 
that the City Messenger be authorized to furnish 
the customary badges. Bead once. 

Mr. Kingsbury of Ward Fifteen offered an order 
that the Committee on Public Buildings be au- 
thorized to enlarge the hose tower on Engine 
House No. 13, and make other repairs, at a cost 
not exceeding $3000. 

Mr. Osborn of Ward Six moved its reference to 
the Committee on the Fire Department, which 
was carried. 

Mr. Hall of Ward One offered an order that a 
committee be appointed, with such as the Board 
of Aldermen may join, to nominate a Chief and 
Assistant Inspector of ballast lighters. 

The order was adopted, ai^d Messrs Hall of Ward 
One, Flynn of Ward Seven and Vannevar of Ward 
Eight, were appointed the committee on the part 
of the Common Council. 

Adjourned. 



17 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN, 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 

JAN. 25, 1869. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Board of Al- 
dermen was held at 4 o'clock this afternoon, his 
Honor, Mayor Shurtleff, in the chair. 

APPOINTMENTS MADE AND CONFIRMED. 

Lieutenants of Police— Daniel Hancock, Samuel 
H. Richards. 

Sergeants of Police — Stephen L. Lewis, George 
Emerson, Horace M. Ford. 

Police Officers, without pay — Joseph Baldwin, 
special officer at rooms of the Cnristian Associa- 
tion, No. 8 Boylston street; Daniel McCloud, 
special officer at the Skating Rink. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

George W. Wheelwright and others, and John 
M. Way and others, that Mt. Warren avenue be 
laid out as a public highway. 

Loyal Lovejoy and others, against the extension 
of Allen street to Charles street. 

John Brooks Parker and others, for the exten- 
sion of Washington street through Portland street 
to Causeway street. 

Association lor Rel ef of Aged Females, that Re- 
vere street, west of Charles street, be laid out as a 
highway, or if already a highway, that certain ob- 
structions be removed therelrom. 

David Snow, that his assessment for betterment 
on Matthews street be apportioned. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Streets. 

David Block, for renewal of lease in Bridge 
estate on Court street. Referred to the Commit- 
tee on Public Buildings. 

John A. Vinton, for abatement of assessment for 
a sewer in Broadway. 

Joel E. Gilman, for abatement of assessment for 
sewer in London street. 

David M. Hodgdon and others, for a sewer in 
Thornton street. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Sewers. 

Isaac Samuels, to be refunded amount paid by 
him lor a tax title on estate in Springer place. 
Referred to committee on Assessors' Department. 

J. C. Webb and others, that the chimneys in the 
planing mills in Albany and Wareham streets may 
be raised, to obviate a nuisance caused by smoke, 
&c. Referred to Committee on Steam Engines, 
&c. 

Owen Russell, for permission to erect a stable 
for six horses in rear of 103 Dedham street. Re- 
ferred to Committee on Health. 

Campbell, Whittier & Co., for compensation for 
damages caused by the grading of Culvert street. 
Referred to Committee on Paving. 

Jewett & Pitcher, that the city would waive legal 
notice on proposed petition to the Legislature for 
leave to lay a rail trac"k in East Boston, to connect 
with the Grand Junction Railroad. Referred to 
the Committee on Paving. 

Officers ot the Ninth "Regiment, for the use of 
Faneuil Hall two evenings in each week, for the 
drill of tneir drum corps. Relerred to Committee 
on Faneuil Hall, with lull powers. 

Rush Brothers and other tenants of stores on 
Hanover street, for the postiJonement of the pro- 
posed widening of that street to March or April 
next year, on account of difficulties in procuring 
tenements. Referied to Commit^en on Streets. 

C. H. & F. B. Day and 59 others of East Boston, 
Dyer & Gurney, Central Iron Foundry and 64 
others of East Boston, and J.S.Evans and 52 others 
of East Boston, severally for the purchase by the 
city of the franchise and property of the East Bos- 
ton Ferry Co. Severally referred to a special com- 
mittee on the subject. 

INTENTIONS TO BUILD. 

Patrick Griffin, No. 2 Wall street; W. F. Savage, 
Cambridge street, near Chambers street; Michael 
Downes, southwest corner of F ana Third streets; 
Patrick Hayes, 283 Federal street; Peter McKen- 



na, Norwich street, corner of Meander street; Ry- 
der & Harris, 51, 53 and 55 Tremont street ; A. S. 
Ripley, Tremont street, corner of Seaver place ; 
David Flynn, corner of Bennet avenue and Prince 
street; Thomas Britton, Ninth street, between H 
and I streets; Weston & Suepard, North Grove 
street, near Cambridge street. Severally referred 
to the Committee on "Streets. 

COMMUNICATION. 

A communication was received from J. P. Brad- 
lee, President of the Board of Public Institutions, 
giving notice of a vacancy in the Board, by the 
death of Francis C. Manning, elected as a Director 
at large lor three years from 1867. Relerred to 
Committee on Nomination of Directors of Public 
Institutions. 

HEARINGS ON ORDERS OF NOTICE. 

The bearing on order of notice on petition of 
Fames & Tucker, tor leave to erect a stable for 
nine horses on Brookhne street, was taken up by 
assignment. No person appearing the report was 
recommitted. 

The hearing on order ot notice relative to re- 
moval of the Eastern Exchange, on the corner of 
Causeway and Beverly streets, adjudged to be an 
unsafe building and a nuisance, was taken up by 
assignment. No person appearing the report was 
recommitted. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

The order to pay Mary J.O'Regan and others,heirs 
of Patrick O'Regan, $1200 lor grade damages, Nos. 
531,533 Shavvmut avenue, in raising the grade of 
said street, was read a second time and passed. 

COMMON COUNCIL PAPERS. 

Petitions irorn the Common Council were re- 
ferred in concurrence. 

The second report of Committee on Joint Rules 
and Orders was recommitted in concurrence. 

Aldermen Fairbanks and Van Nostrand were 
joined to the committee of the Common Council 
on the nomination of Inspectors of Ballast Light- 
ers. 

The report of Committee on Nomination of 
Trustees of City Hospital was accepted, wnen 
the election of Trustees on the part of the Board 
of Aldermen took place, with the following re- 
sult: 

The name of Dr. Rust was withrawn by Alder- 
man Fairbanks, ot the committee, at his request. 

Whole number of votes 12 

Necessary to a choice 7 

Alderman — Newton Talbot U 

Common Council— Samuel T. Snow 12 

Edw. E. Batchelder. . 5 

Thomas L. Jenks 7 

At Large — Jonas Ball 12 

Theodore Metcalt 11 

William A. Rust. 1 

Alderman Talbot, Samuel T. Snow of the Com- 
mon Council, and Jonas Ball and Theodore Met- 
calf, at large, were declared to be elected in con- 
currence, and Thomas L. Jenks in non-concur- 
xence 

The following orders were referred in concur- 
rence: 

Orders for purchase of a site at South Boston for 
a Hook and Ladder House, and for plans, at a cost 
of $22,000. Referred to Committee on Public 
Buildings. 

The order for proposed amendment of Ordin- 
ance relating to Taxes. Referred to Committee on 
the Assessors' Department. 

Alderman Talbot said in relation to the last 
named, that it should properly be referred first to 
the Committee on Ordinances, yet he was not 
strenuous on the subject. 

HANOVER STREET WIDENING. 

The petitions of Rush Brothers and others for a 
postponement of the work of widening of Hanover 
street, having been read, with the reasons there- 
for— 

Alderman Talbot moved that the petitioners be 
allowed a hearing on the suDject before the whole 
Board, on Monday next, 4 o'clock. 

Alderman Richards suggested whether it would 
not be better that the hearing should take place 
before the Committee on Laying Out and Widen- 
ing streets, for the matter must eventually go be- 
fore that Committee, and he much preferred the 
judgment of the Committee in such cases. 



JANUARY 2 5 



18 6 9. 



18 



Alderman Talbot replied that the question was 
one purely of lenity, which the whole Board could 
much better judge of, and he would like to have 
the opinion of every member in the matter. At 
the first blush the judgment would be that the 
work of cutting off should be commenced at once, 
yet if there were good reasons for the postpone- 
ment, such a postponement should be allowed. 

The motion for the hearing before the whole 
Board was carried. 

PURCHASE OF THE EAST BOSTON FERRY ERAN- 
CHISE. 

On the presentation of the before mentioned 
petitions for ttie purchase of the franchise and 
property of the East Boston Ferry Company, the 
petitions being in aid of others presented to the 
Common Council, 

Alderman Talbot stated that for some reason or 
other, the petitions, ot which these were in aid, 
had not reached the Board, having been referred 
to a special committee on the part of the Common 
Council. He supposed, however, that they would 
some time be received. To meet the question 
fully, be ofieied the following order, which was 
adopted: 

Ordered, That a special committee, consisting 
of three on the part of the Board, with such as the 
Common Council may join, be appointed to consid- 
er and report upon the expediency of purchasing 
the franchise, property, rights and privileges of 
the East Boston Ferry Co., as provided in the act 
of incorporation of said company, or any act which 
may be passed by the Legislature now in session. 

Aldermen Heaver, Talbot, and Pratt, the Com- 
mittee on Ferries, were appointed the committee 
on the part of the Board of Aldermen. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Alderman White, from the Committee on Li- 
censes, reported in favor of granting licenses to 
sundry persons as victuallers and innholders, and 
for the relicensing of 120 newsboys, 31 bootblacks, 
4 to sell boot and shoe lacinss, and in favor of 5 
new applications for licenses as newsboys, and 
2 as bootblacks. Accepted. 

The same Committee reported in favor of grant- 
ing licenses to sundry persons as auctioneers, for 
waigon stands,, and wagon licences, and for trans- 
fer of license to ueep billiard tables. Accepted. 

The same Committee reported leave to with- 
draw, on petition ot Christian Hinselmann, for a 
license as a common victualler, .No. 17% School 
street. Accepted. 

The special committee to whom was referred the 
petition of Charles R. McLean, thac the ballots 
cast for Aldermen at the last municipal election in 
Ward One may be recounted, reported that under 
the provisions of chapter 114 of the acts of 1863 
this board have no authority to recount the ballots 
cast at the last municipal election in any ward, 
unless the seat of some member of the board is 
contested by a person who received votes for the 
office. The report was accompanied by the opin- 
ion of the City Solicitor. 

Read and accepted. 

ORDERS FOR PUBLIC HEARINGS. 

Aldeiman Talbot, from the Committee on Laying 
Out and Widening Streets, submitted reports, 
which were adopted, as follows : 

On the notice of Mark Dowling of intention to 
build on West street,, a notification of all parties 
interested of the intention of the Board to widen. 
West street. Hearing Monday Feb. 8, 4 P.M. 

Notice of intention to extend Broadway. Hear- 
ing Monday, Feb. 8, 4 P. M. 

Alderman Talbot said he had also a notice to 
quit to tenants on tbe line of widening of Hanover 
street. A hearing having been ordered to peti- 
tioners, on his motion this notice was laid on the 
table. 

RECOGNITION OF SERVICES OF HON. JOHN P.. 
BIGELOW. 

Alderman White offered the following resolu- 
tions, which were unanimously adopted : 

Whereas, Tne recent resignation of the Hon. 
John P. Bigelow, as a trustee of the Public Li- 
brary, is the closing act of a career equally honor- 
able to himself and beneficial to tbe city, whose 
interests he has most faithfully served, therefore 

Resolved, That the thanks of the City Council 
of Boston are hereby tendered Mr. Bigelow 



for his long and arduous public labors, which date 
back to a very early era in our municipal history, 
and have been thus recently terminated. 

Resolved, That in every position which he has 
been called upon to occupy, as a member ot the 
Common Council seven years, over which he pre- 
sided with marked and well remembered ability — 
as Mayor during three years of eventful interest — 
and as a Trustee of the Public Library from its in- 
ception until now, Mr. Bigelow has been diligent, 
devoted and distinguished, and his services nave 
only been measured by his strength and opportu- 
nities. 

Resolved, That by his earnest and efficient labors 
during the early period of his Mayoralty for the 
establishment of a Free City Library, by his appli- 
cation of a fund raised as a personal testimonial to 
himself to this great object— it being the first 
money appropriated lor the purpose— and by his 
exertions in securing the financial aid of two of its 
earliest and most munificent patrons, he has well 
earned the title of the founder of the Public Li- 
brary of the City of Boston, and as sucn he must 
always be rscognized, respected and remembered. 

ORDERS PASSED. 

On motion of Alderman Talbot, 

Ordered, That the Committee on Laying Out and 
Widening Streets be and they hereby are author- 
ized to employ suitable persons during the present 
municipal year to assist them in making; estimates, 
betterments, and performing such other services 
as they may require, at an expense not exceeding 
the sum of $5001), the same to be charged to the 
appropriation for laying out and widening streets. 

On motion of Alderman Richards, 

Ordered, That the Chief Engineer be and he is 
hereby authorized to purchase, under the direction 
of the Committee on the Fire Department,one pair 
of horses for Hook and Ladder Company No. 1, at 
an expense of $850, the same to be charged to the 
appropriation for the Fire Department. 

Ordered, That the sum of $800 be and is hereby 
appropriated for the repairs of (old) Engine No. 5, 
under the direction of the Chief Engineer, the same 
to be charged to the appropriation for the Fire 
Department. 

Ordered, That the Chief-Engineer, under the di- 
rection of the Committee on tbe Fire Department, 
be and he is hereby authorized to contract for a 
four-wheeled hose carriage, at an expense not 
exceeding $600, the same to be charged to the 
appropriation for the Fire Department. 

Ordered, That the Committee on the Fire De- 
partment, (Aldermen Richards, Seaver and 
Hawes,) with such as the Common Council may- 
join, constitute a joint special committee to exam- 
ine and approve the necessary expenditures from 
the appropriation for the Fire Department, as re- 
quired by the terms of the Appropriation bill of 
1868. 

Ordered, That the Committee on Fire Alarms be 
authorized to expend, when necessary, a sum not 
exceeding $500, in each case, for attaching the 
proper striking apparatus to any of the bells in the 
city— said sums to be charged to the appropriation 
for Fire Alarms. 

On motion of Alderman James : 

Ordered, That the Committee on the Common 
(Aldermen James, Richards and Bradlee,) with 
such as the Common Council may join, constitute 
a joint special committee to examine and approve 
the necessary expenditures from the appropriation 
for the Common and the Public Squares, as re- 
quired by the terms of the Appropriation bill ot 
1868. 

On motion of Alderman Talbot, 

Order to pay Michael B. Gleeson $4800 for land 
taken and damages occasioned by the widening of 
Summer street, by resolve passed Nov. 17, 1868. 

Order to pay Michael H. Gleeson $17,330 for land 
taken and damages occasioned by the widening of 
High street, by resolves passed Nov. 17, 1868. 

On motion of Alderman VanNostrand, 

Ordered, That the Committee on Police be re- 
quested to consider and report on the expediency 
of having a Station House in Ward Thirteen. 

On motion of Alderman James, 

Ordered, That the City Treasurer be directed to 
abate the assessment of $89 74 on George D. Lord, 
103 Princeton street, for a sidewalk, by reason of 
inability to pay the same. 

Adjourned. 



19 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 

JAN". 28, 1869. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Common 
Council was held at 7% o'clock this evening, 
Wm. G. Harris, the President, in the chair. 

PAPERS FKOM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

The petitions of David Block for renewal of 
lease in Bridge estate on Court street, and of Isaac 
Samuels to he refunded amount paid by him for a 
tax title on estate in Springer place, were referred 
in concurrence. 

The notice of a vacancy in the Board of Directors 
for Public Institutions, occasioned by the decease 
of Francis C. Manning, was referred' to the Com- 
mittee on Nomination of Directors, in concur- 
rence. 

The order appointing a joint committee to con- 
sider the expediency of purchasing the property 
and rights of the East Boston Ferry Company was 
adopted, in concurrence, and Messrs. Andrew 
Hal!, Thomas Dinsmore, Joseph T. Ryan, Jere- 
miah H. Pote and John O.Poor, the Committee on 
Ferries of the Common Council, were joined to 
the committee. 

The petitions of I. S. Evans and fifty-two others, 
Dyer & Gnrney and sixty-five others, and C. H. & 
F." B. Day and fifty-nine others, that the city would 
purchase the property and ritrhts of said Com- 
pany, were referred to the above committee, in 
concurrence. 

The resolution of thanks to the Hon. John P. 
Bigelow, for his long and arduous public labors, 
recently terminated by his resignation as a Trus- 
tee of the Public Library, being under considera- 
tion. 

Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteen said the resolutions 
expressed so fully the distinguished services per- 
formed by Mr. Bigelow that nothing need be said, 
yet from his personal knowledge of some of those 
services, he could not let the opportunity pass of 
saying a word in approval of tuem. It was well- 
known that through the eminent services of Mr. 
Bigelow the Public Library was established, and 
from the first day in which it went into operation 
he had not tailed to promote its interests, and in 
all the time in which he had acted as a Trustee, 
there was no single instance in which,while he was 
able, that he was absent from the meetings of the 
board. Now, in his declining years, when about 
to retire from his public duties, it was fitting and 
proper that resolutions of this character should 
be passed, and he hoped they would be adopted 
by a unanimous vote. 

The resolutions were read a second time by 
their title, and passed by a unanimous vote. 

The order authorizing the Committee on Fire 
Alarms to expend not over $500, in each case, for 
attaching striking apparatus to any of the bells 
of the city, was read once. 

The order appointing the Committee on the Fire 
Department to be joined, a committee to examine 
and approve the expenditures of said Department, 
as required by the appropriation bill, was adopt- 
ed, and the Committee on the Fire Department of 
the Common Council were joined to the Commit- 
tee. 

The order appointing the Committee on the 
Common to be joined, a committee to examine 
and aporove the expenditures for Common and 
Squares', as required by the appropriation bill, 
was adopted in concurrence, and the Committee 
on Common and Squares, of the Common Council, 
were joined to the Committee. 

The' certificate of the election of Thomas L. 
Jenks a3 a Trustee of the City IPospital, in the 
place of Edward E. Batchelder, chosen by the 
Common Council, was read. 

The Council proceeded to the election of a Trus- 
tee, and Messrs. Keaney of Ward Two, Woods of 
Ward Twelve, and Leonard of Ward Eleven, were 



appointed a committee to receive, sort and count 
the votes. The Committee reported as follows : 

Whole number of votes 49 

Necessary to a choice 25 

Edward E. Batchelder 22 

Thomas L. Jenks 27 

Five ballots cast for Directors of Public Institu- 
tions were not counted. Mr. Jenks was declared 
to be elected, in concurrence. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

The order requesting the Mayor to appoint the 
members of the Comniou Council special police- 
men was considered. 

Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteen said that having been 
appointed such an officer l^st year, and not having, 
learned what its duties or emoluments were, he 
wished to be informed what they were and what 
the object of obtaining the proposed badge was. 
If the members were to be policemen they should 
have a billy. Unless he could learn something 
more in relation to the matter he should move to 
lay the order on the table. The motion wasmade 
and lost. 

Mr. Hopkins of Ward Ten said he offered the 
order as a matter of courtesy to the new members. 

Mr. Ingalls of Ward Twelve said he should de- 
cline the honor of being appointed a special po- 
liceman. If the appointment must be made he 
should be in favor of providing the members with 
an uniform, billy and revolver, and assign them 
to some beat. Xhf re had been much talk outside 
about this matter, and it was believed to be a very 
foolish expenditure of money. 

The order was passed by a vote 35 to 12. 

The order authorizing the Auditor of Accounts 
to transfer from the reserved lund to the appropri- 
ation for the Engineer's and Surveyor's Depart- 
ment one thousand dollars, to be expended for 
such surveys, plans and maps as may be required 
under the order of the 22d of December last, in re- 
lation to the proposed annexation of Dorchester, 
was considered. 

On motion of Mr. Flynn of Ward Seven, the 
order was amended to provide that the money be 
expended under the direction of the Committee 
on the Surveyor's Department. 

As amended, it was passed, yeas 51, nays none 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Mr. Batchelder of Ward Four, from the Joint 
Special Committee to nominate Directors of Pub- 
lic Institutions, reported the names of the follow- 
ing persons : 

Board of Aldermen — Lewis Kice. 

Common Council— WiiHam M. Flanders, Hollis 
K. Gray. 

At Large— (For three years,) Sylvanus A. Denio, 
Increase E. Noyes, Samuel C. Cobb; for one year, 
to fill a vacancy by the decease of F. C. Manning, 
George P. French. 

On motion of Mr. Flynn of Ward Seven, the 
Council proceeded to an election, and Messrs. 
Flynn of Ward Seven, Denny of Ward Ten, and 
Conant of Ward Filteen,were appointed a commit- 
tee to receive, sort and count the votes. 

The Committee reported as follows : 

Whole number of votes 55 

Necessary to a choice 28 

Alderman — Lewis Rice 55 

Common Council— Wm. M. Flanders 5] 

Wm. Woolley ?5 

Hollis R. Gray 24 

At large— (3 yrs.)— S. A. Denio 45 

Increase E. Noyes..36 

S. C. Cobb 44 

Wm. Seaver 19 

Geo. P. Darrow . . 6 
Zimri B. Heywood.. . 5 

Henry Warren 5 

T.W.Gould 3 

Geo. P. Faunce 1 

At large— (1 yr.)— Geo. P.French 20 

T.Warren Gould 17 

Geo. P. Darrow 6 

Zimri B. Heywood. . 5 

Geo. P. Faunce 4 

T. C.Collins 1 

Wm. Seaver 1 

Messrs. Rice, Flanders, Woolley, Denio, Noyes 
and Cobb were declared elected, and there was no 
choice on filling the vacancy for one year. 



JANUARY 2 8 



18 6 9 



30 



Thfi ballot to fill the vacancy was reported as fol- 
lows : 

Whole number of votes 56 

Necessary to a choice 29 

T. Warren Gould 25 

VVm. beaver 13 

George P. French 11 

Zimri B. Heywoocl 6 

George. P. Darrow, G. P. Faunce, H. War- 
ren, one each 3 

The third ballot resulted as follows : 

Whole number of votes 55 

Neeessarv to a choice 28 

T. Warren Gould 28 

Wm. Seaver 13 

Geo. P. French 7 

Henry Warren 2 

Z. B. Heywood 2 

Geo. P. Darrow, Wm. Flanders, A. Plum- 
er, one each 3 

Mr. Gould was declared elected lor one year. 

The Joint Special Committee to nominate candi- 
dates ior the Cochituate Water Board, made re- 
ports as follows: 

Board of Aldermen— Benjamin James. 

Common Council — Alexander Wads worth, Ly- 
man A. Belknap. 

At Large— Nathaniel J. Bra dlee, Charles H, Al- 
len. 

The above was reported by Aldermen Richards 
and Seaver. 

Another ticket, recommended by S. T. Snow and 
S. B. Hopkins oi the Common Council, was as fol- 
lows: 

Board of Aldermen — Benjamin James. 

Common Council — Alexander Wadsworth, F. A. 
Osborn. 

At Large— Nathaniel J. Bradlee, Charles H. 
Allen. 

A third ticket, recommended by James J. Flynn 
of the committee, was as follows: 

Board of Aldermen — Benjamin James. 

Common Council — Sidney Squires, Lyman A. 
Belknap. 

At Large— Nathaniel J. Bradlee, Charles R. 
Train. 

On motion of Mr. Snow, the reports were laid on 
the table. 

Mr. Lucas of Ward Seven, from the Joint Special 
Committee to nominate a candidate for Superin- 
tendent of Fire Alarms, recommended for reelec- 
tion John F. Kennard. 

Mr. Woolley of Ward One, from the Committee 
to nominate candidates for Trustees of Mt. Hope 
Cemetery, reported candidates as follows: 

Board of Aldermen— Edward A. White. 

Common Council — Samuel B. Hopkins and Ed- 
mund B. Vannevar. 

At Large— Joseph T. Paine. 

These reports were severally accepted and order- 
ed to be sent up. 

Mr. Tucker of Ward Six, from the Committee on 
the Fire Department, to whom was referred the 
nrd°r authorizing the Committee on Public Build- 
ings to repair Engine House No. 13, ac an expense 
not exceeding $3000, reported that the order ought 
to pass. 

The report was accepted, and the order was read 
a second time and passed. 

Mr. Tucker, from the same committee, to whom 
was referred the order requesting the Chief Engi- 
neer of the Fire Department to give his opinion in 
regard to the necessity of having two Assistant 
Engineers in East Boston, and two in South Bos- 
ton, transmitted a communication which they had 
received from the Chief Engineer. They further 
sav, after carefully considering the subject, the 
committee are satisfied that it would be for the 
public interest to have an additional Assistant En- 
gineer located at East Boston, and, therefore, rec- 
ommend the passage of an accompanying ordi- 
nance, making the whole number of Assistant 
Engineers thirteen instead of twelve. 

The Chief Engineer of the Fire Department in 
his communication, gives it as his opinion that the 
interest and safety of tne city demands an addi- 
tional engineer at East Boston, while at South 
Boston ho such necessity exists. After making a 
statement of the number of inhabitants, with sta- 
tistics relating to East Boston, embracing much 
material of an inflammable nature, he remarks that 



in many instances the apparatus has to be sliifted 
to different Dipes in order to obtain a supply of 
water, and can only be done by having the author- 
ity to command, and here much valuable time is 
consumed in the early and incipient stages of afire, 
and many other points are neglected, which could 
be covered by the second Engineer. East Boston 
being only reached by ferriage, and that unrelia- 
ble, the Engineer has a large amount of duty to 
perform, from the extent of the territory, in addi- 
tion to putting out fires. 

This Engineer is appointed to this district be- 
cause his residence and business is there, but no 
gentleman could tor a moment suppose that this 
officer would always be omnipresent; he must una- 
voidably be absent at times, for, like other men, 
he must provide for his family, and when absent 
there is no safety for this section of the city, so far 
as the authority and duty of the officer is con- 
cerned. In case of fire, help is sent at once, but 
fifteen or twenty minutes is the shortest time it 
can be made available, on account of the location 
and ferriage. The force of the district is as large 
as that of Charlestown or Lynn, and under the 
command of one man, till assistance reaches him 
from the city proper. 

In relation to South Boston, it is stated that no 
such exigency exists, there being more means of 
access, better water resources and a more efficient 
force. Three Assistant Engineers besides the resi- 
dent Engineer doing duty on the first alarm, and 
are within eight minutes of the resident Engineer. 

This district, be says in conclusion, he considers 
better protected incase of fire, wi+h one exception . 
than any other in the city— the exception being 
the want of a Ladder Company, which he hopes 
the City Council will provide at the earliest time. 

The accompanying ordinance, relating to the 
Fire Department, provides for an amendment of 
the ordinance of August 20, 1861, as amended Jan. 
31, 1868, by striking out the word "twelve" in each 
case and inserting "thirteen." 

The report was accepted and the ordinance was 
read once. 

Mr. Denny of Ward Ten thought the proper 
course would be to refer the ordinance to the 
Committee on Ordinances. He made such a mo- 
tion, which was carried. 

The same committee, to whom were referred 
the orders authorizing the purchase of a lot of 
land at the junction of Warren and Dudley streets, 
at an expense of $10,000, for the purpose of having 
erected thereon a building for a Hook and Ladder 
Carriage and a ward room for Ward Fourteen, 
made a report, in which they recommend that the 
accompanying order, authorizing the enlargement 
of the present Hook and Ladder House on the 
old burying ground on Eustis street, be substi- 
tuted for the order referred to them. A similar 
order was passed by the Common Council of last 
year, but too late to receive the consideration of 
the Board of Aldermen. 

The burying ground on Eustis street belongs to 
the city, and as there are no tombs or graves in 
the rear of the present building lor a distance of 
twenty-eight feet, there can be no objection to the 
enlargement for the purpose of furnishing accom- 
modations for the horses attached to the Ladder 
carriage. The necessary alterations can be made 
for less than $3000, while the expense for purchas- 
ing land in another locality and erecting anew 
building cannot be less than $30,000. 

Ordered, That the Committee on Public Buildings 
be authorized to erect a brick building mthe rear 
of, and connected with, the present Hook and Lad- 
der House on Eustis street, and provide accommo- 
dations therein for the horses attached to Hook 
and Ladder Carriage No. 4; said addition not to 
extend more than twenty-eight feet in the rear of 
the present structure, and the expense of building 
the same not to exceed the sum of$3000, and to be 
charged to the appropriation for Public Buildings. 

Ths report was accepted, and the order was read 
once. 

EAST BOSTON FERRIES. 

Mr. Hall of Ward One, from the Special Com- 
mittee of the Common Council, to whom were re- 
ferred the petitions of the National Dock and 
Warehouse Company, Manson & Peterson, Samuel 
Hall and others, that the city would purchase the 
property of the East Boston Ferry Co., made a re- 
port recommending the reference of the petitions 
to the Joint Special Committee on the subject. 
Accepted. 



21 



COMMON COUNCIL 



PETITIONS^PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

J. H. Pote and Oliver Frost, to be compensated 
for damages to their lot on Seaver street, occa- 
sioned by excavations on the adjoining lot. .Re- 
ferred to Committee on Claims. 

ORDERS PASSEB. 

On motion of Mr. Wilkics of Ward Nine, it was 
ordered that a committee, with such as the Board 
of Aldermen may join, be appointed to nominate a 
Superintendent of Public Buildings. 

Messrs. Wilkins ot Ward Nine, Hopkins of 
Ward Ten, and Davis of Ward Thirteen, were ap- 
pointed the Committee on the part of the Com- 
mon Council. 

On motion of Mr. Batchelder of Ward Pour, an 
order was read twice and passed, for the payment 
of bills for services rendered by persons directly 
connected with the city government. 

On motion of Mr. lngalls of Ward Twelve, 

Ordered, That the City Messenger be directed to 
furnish each member of the City Council with one 
copy ot Cushing's Elements of the Law and Prac- 
tice of the Legislative Assemblies of the United 
States, the expense to be charged to incidental 
expenses. 

On motion of Mr. Wadsworth of Ward Pour, an 
order was passed, with a preamble setting forth 



that a bill had been introduced in the Legislature 
in relation to the purchase of tbe East Boston fer- 
ries, and that the City Solicitor be requested to ap- 
pear before the committee ot the Legislature hav- 
ing the same under consideration, and take such 
action as he may deem expedient to protect tbe 
city's interest. 

On motion of Mr. Pickering of Ward Fourteen, 

Ordered, That in the distribution of badges, tbe 
City Messenger be directed to provide them for the 
newly elected members only. 

Mr. Jenks of Ward Three moved that the dates 
of the old ones be changed. 

The Chair stated that the Council had no control 
over tbe old badges of members. 

Mr. Snow of Ward Eleven raised a question of 
construction of the language ot the order, wheth- 
er it would not apply to all members, as newly 
elected. 

The Chair stated that the Messenger would put 
his own construction on the language. 

On motion of Mr. Byan of Ward Thirteen, 

Ordered, That the Committee on Bathing be re- 
requested to consider and report upon having a 
bathing house in Ward Thirteen. 

Adjourned. 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



3 3 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 
FEB. 1, 1869. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Board of Al- 
dermen was held this atternoon, his Honor Mayor 
Suurtleff in the chair. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

Blake & Aklen, Palmer, Batchelders & Co. and 
eighty-seven others, F. W. Hollingsworth and 
fltty-eight others, Henry C. Ray and forty-seven 
others, and Wm. F. Green and forty one others, 
severally in favor of the purchase of the East Bos- 
ton Ferry Company's property by the city. Re- 
ferred to the special committee on that subject. 

John F. Pray and 170 others that Eaton street 
be extended to Blossom street. 

.Nathan Matthews, for apportionment of better- 
ment on Matthews street into three parts. 

Theodore Otis and 300 others, for the extension 
of Harrison avenue from Eustis street to Dudley 
street. 

Charles Hurlburt and others, that Shawmut av- 
enue, between Bartlett and Washington streets, 
be straightened. 

Boston Car Spring Company, for a right of way 
across Providence Railroad tracks, near Pynchon 
street. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Streets. 

Edward Cobb and 100 others, payers of rents and 
taxes, for protection against venders of lrnits, 
candies, &c in the streets. Referred to Commit- 
tee on Police. 

All the officers and patrolmen of the police force, 
that their pay may be increased. Referred to the 
Committee on Police. 

Abby Welch, to be paid for personal injuries sus- 
tained for an alleged defect in Court street. Re- 
ferred to Committee on Claims. 

A. G. Delaporte and others, for the grade of New- 
man street. Referred to Committee on Paving. 

Co. B, First Battalion of Cavalry, for allowance 
for rent of armory. Referred to the Committee on 
Armories, &c. 

Fergus Brennan and others, for abatement of as- 
sessment for removal of a nuisance in Dunlow 
street. Referred to Committee on Health. 

Charles U. Cotting.that the Trement street drain 
opposite Common street may be lowered. Re- 
ferred to Committee on Sewers. 

John Town & Son, for a lamp in North Grove 
street. Referred to Committee on Lamps. 

Barzilla T. Folder, for leave to sell articles at the 
corner of Temple place and Washington street. 
Referred to Committee on Licenses. 

Samuel West, for leave to maintain a steam 
engine and boiler at No. 7 Avon place. Referred 
to Committee on Steam Engines, &e. 

Bridget O'Brien, for compensation for injury sus- 
tained by fall.ng on the ice in Hamilton street. 
Referred to Committee on Claims. 

John Roessele, to be compensated for damages 
by raising the graae of Pynchon street. Referred 
to Committee on Paving. 

L. F. Whiting and others, that the name of 
Foundry street, either in Ward Seven or in Ward 
Thirteen, be changed. Referred to Committee on 
Paving. 

Joseph Silvera, to be appointed draw tender on 
Dover Street Bridge. Sent down. 

Edward Millear, for a stand on the streets for 
the sale of articles. Referred to Committee on Li- 
censes. 

NOTICES OF INTENTION TO BUILD. 

Mary Ann Hobbs, 287 North street; Davis 
Daum, Princeton, between Brooks and Putnam 
streets; Margaret McCarty, corner of Webber and 
Plymouth streets; Owen Howard, 13 South Margin 
street; O. Tilden, Jr., 9 to 21 Hampshire street; 
Silas Studley, 18 Bulnnch street; N. D. Randall, 
Seventh, between E and F streets ; C. Tilden, Jr., 
264 to ^70 Dudley street; Angus Douglas, corner of 
Lenox and Sawyer streets ; C. A. Richards, 1042 



Washington street; J. & W. Cavanagb, Lehigh, 
near Albany street. 
Severally referred to the Committee on Streets. 

EAST BOSTON FERRY COMPANY. 

The annual statement of the East Boston Ferry 
Company of the receipts and expenditures of the 
company for the year 1868, as sworn to by the Di- 
rectors, was submitted and ordered to be printed. 

The receipts are given as follows: 

For six months ending June 30, 1868 $G6,203 78 

" " " Dec. 31, 1868 72,532 09 



Total. $138,735 87 

The expenditures were as follows : 

Wages and salaries .$49,469 81 

Coal, 4072 tons 33,(165 74 

Marine and Fire Insurance 14,882 92 

Interest on Bonds and Notes 11,856 50 

Repairs of boats and machinery 8,379 57 

Repairs of drops and landings 6,320 24 

U. S. 'Justoms and Revenue tax 4,047 34 

Rent of Sargent's wharf 3,700 00 

City Water rates 2,871 16 

Chandlery materials, &c 2,661 94 

Professional services 2,331 56 

Bond account 2,243 62 

Cartinar and weighing coal 1 ,875 19 

Boston and East Boston Gas Co 1,573 38 

Oil, tallow and waste 1,215 01 

State and City taxes 1,165 92 

Printing, advertising, &c 217 69 

Sundry damages 128 50 

Depreciation 25,000 00 

§173,006 Oi) 

Showing a deficit of. 34,270 22 

Trial balance — 

Capital stock $225,000 00 

Ferry property $179,831 23 

Dividend No. *3 44 00 

" No. 4 136 00 

Accounts payable 2,943 56 

Tollman's account 215 00 

Bond " 95,000 00 

Suspense " 5,009 03 

Notes pavable 05,463 39 

Construction account 197,704 65 

Fuel " 1,918 98 

Cash " 3,908 06 



$388,586 95 $388,586 95 
CITY HOSPITAL. 

The fifth annual report of the Trustees of the 
City Hospital was presented in print. Read ana 
sent down. 

The number of patients treated in the Hospital 
during the year was 2219; discharged, 1875; died 
163; remaining, 181 ; largest number at any one 
time, 230; smallest, 137; average, 172. Medical 
out patients, 3851; surgical patients. 2732; op- 
thalmia, 1652; cutaneous, 559— total, 8791. The 
number of visits of out patients was 29,756. With 
an increase of patients of 33 per cent., the propor- 
tion of deaths was lower than ever before, being 
7 3-10 per cent. There have been brought to the 
Hospital accidentally injured 417. 

The estimate for current expenses was $85,000, 
which has been exceeded. The estimate for the 
present vear is $90,000. Income from paying pa- 
tients, $3000. 

In view of the increased demand for hospital ac- 
commodations, the Trustees commend to the early 
attention of ihe City Council the necessity of the 
erection of additional pavilions, in accordance 
with the intent of the originators of the institu- 
tion. The request is renewed for donations to the 
library. The report of the Superintendent gives, 
inconsiderable detail, the expenditures, with va- 
rious statistics, the employment of patients ad- 
mitted during the year, the various kinds of dis- 
eases, &c. 

CITY REGISTRAR'S REPORT. 

A report was received from the City Uegistrar, 
stating that he has received for certificates of 
intentions of marriage during the quarter ending 
Jan. 30, $51G, which sum he "lias put into the City 
Treasury; and during the same period he has reg- 
istered 3132 marriages. The number of births in 
the city during the year 1868, was 7192 ; the num- 
ber of deaths was 5519. The usual detailed report, 
will be presented to the City Council at the ear- 
liest possible moment. 



23 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF FAJTEUIL HALL 
MARKET. 

Kent of stalls in market $10,3CG 50 

" cellars " 5,280 (IU 

" from permanent outside stands 498 75 

Receipts lrom lees for weighing 158 00 

Rents of stalls in new market 3,030 00 

" " cellars " " 1,402 50 

Total §20,795 75 

The whole amount of winch was paid into the 
City Treasury. 

HEARINGS ON ORDERS OF NOTICE. 

The hearing on order of notice on petition to lay 
out Shoe and Leather street by the naineof "'John'*' 
street was taken up. 

No person appearing, the order was recommit- 
ted. 

The hearing on petition of Milo Whitney for 
leave to put up a steam engine at No. 1057 "Wash- 
ington street was taken up. 

No person appearing in opposition, the report 
was recommitted . 

"WIDENING OF HANOVER STREET. 

The healing of petitioners on the request for de- 
lav in the widening of Hanover street was taken 
up. 

A. A. Banney, Esq., who appeared for remon- 
strants, called several witnesses in favor of the pe- 
tition for postponement in the widening of the 
street. 

Benjamin Bradley, located at 149 Hanover street, 
stated that he had been a tenant in that locality 
and in business as a dealer in clocks many years ; 
he had now a lease running five years ; the cutting 
off would take one-hall of his store, and would 
oblige him to vacate the premises, much to the 
injury of his business; it would be very difficult to 
obtain a tenement at this tune; any time within a 
year would be lull short in obtaining a tenement; 
he knew of many leases which would expire in 
about a year. 

W. P. B. Brooks had occupied a store on Hano- 
ver street for thirty years, and in view of the pro- 
posed improvement had been in pursuit of a store, 
but could not obtain one suitable for his purposes 
within a year; the cutting off would take twenty- 
two feet, more than one-third of his store. His 
entrance was not on Hanover street. 

William A. Bust (Rust Brothers, 43 Hanover 
street,) stated that there would be great difficul- 
ties in obtaining such a tenement as he should 
need m his business. The cutting off would not 
necessitate a removal, but it would be a great hin- 
drance to the business. Their lease expired in 
December last, but was conditionally renewed. 
The store is about ninety feet in depth. * In case ot 
extension of time, an effbit would be made to ob- 
tain another store. 

Elisba Myrick, of the firm of Heath, Cheney & 
Co., 85 Hanover street, stated that their lease 
would expire a year from next May. Since the 1st 
January he had made efforts to obtain a store. 
With a delay he might obtain a store, but they 
would be obliged to remove, for they could not do 
business to any advantage duriug the cutting off. 
The cutting off would make no special difference 
as to the time, for they would be obliged to leave. 

Jos. H. Bancroft, 121 hanover street, crockery 
and paner hanging business, had been engaged in 
that business tor many years, and would be sub- 
jected to serious loss by the cutting off. Most of 
his store would be cut oft, and no suitable store 
could be obtained at any price. His lease expired 
in August next, and had been renewed. There 
had been no serious consideration of the subject of 
widening the street when the renewal was made 

Isaac Seabmy said he and his brother had leases 
at 45 and 81 Hanover street, which expire in about 
a year; it will be a very great inconvenience to be 
obliged to move at this time. 

Horace Partridge, 27 Hanover street, had a lease 
running near. three years; he had not tried to get 
another store, and did not know where he could 
look for one ; the store would be much injured by 
the cutting off, for it had little back land ; if he had 
a years time, he would reduce his stock, and at- 
tempt to get a new store ; he did not wish to leave 
the street, but would be obliged to in case of 
widening. 

A. O. Sweet, had a lease which expired a year 
from next April, and would prefer to remain in 
the street; the Iront was wider than the rear, and 



the cutting off would spoil the store; he would as 
soon have it cut off in the spring as any time; he 
would not think of staying there should it be cut 
off; there was a talk oi widening the street when 
he purchased the lease, but it was not believed 
that it would be done. 

John J. Bayner stated that out of 23 leases of 
his father's estate, 21 expire in April, 1870. 

John Simaons advocated a postponement for 
the reasons that on account of the proposed im- 
provements already contemplated, labor and ma- 
terials will rule very hign, and by a postponement 
more time would be given to tenants to procure 
stores. He did not believe that this improvement 
was so much needed as were many others. 

B. F. Edmands said he had beard that it was con- 
templated to extend Washington street to Portland 
street, and presumed it would be done. On that 
account he thought this project should be post- 
poned. If Washington street should be extended, 
this cutting off should he delerred, and yet it had 
been urged that this should be pushed through, 
lest the carrying out of the other measure should 
defeat it. 

Alderman Richards suggested that if any other 
evidence than of a cumulative character was to be 
offered, it would be well to put it in; otherwise 
that the hearing should close. 

Mr. Kanney stated that the further evidence was 
mainly cumulative. 

The "report was laid on the table. 

COMMON COUNCIL PAPERS. 

Petitions from the Common Council were re- 
ferred in concurrence. 

The order to request the City Solicitor to appear 
before the Legislative Committee on the East Bos- 
ton Ferries, to protect the City's interest, coming 
up— 

Alderman Talbot said he did not know which 
side the Common Council desired the City Solici- 
tor to take, and in the absence of that knowledge, 
hoped the order would not pass. The order was 
lost. 

The Ordinance to increase the number of Fire En- 
gineers to thirteen, referred to Committee on Ordi- 
nances, being under consideration, 

Alderman Richards &aid it appeared that the or- 
dinance came from the Committee on Fire De- 
partment of the Common Council, and as it had not 
been to any Committee of the Board, it should be 
referred to the same committee in this branch. 

The question was stated to be on concurrence 
with the Council. 

Alderman Bichards did not think the reference 
proposed would interfere with the final disposi- 
tion ot the matter in concurrence with the Coun- 
cil. On his motion the ordinance was referred to 
the Committee on Fire Department ot the Board. 

The order to furnish each member of the Com- 
mon Council with a large copy of Cushing's Manu- 
al was considered. 

Alderman Talbot inquired if the reading of the 
order was the Cominofr Council or the City Coun- 
cil. 

The Mayor replied, the City Council. 

Alderman Bichards wished to know if the mem- 
bers of the last City Council were furnished wifh 
copies of the work; if so, they should be fur- 
nished only to new members. 

Alderman Talbot said it was understood that they 
were last year. 

The Mayor replied that the furnishing of such 
works had never before been done. The pre- 
vious purchase had been of Cushing's Manual, a 
small work. 

Alderman Talbot said if such was the case, a 
proper reference of tnis subject would be to the 
Committee on Printing. 

A motion for such reference was carried. 

The order to repair Engine House ]\o. 13, on mo- 
tion of Alderman Bichards, was refened to the 
Committee on Pubfic Buildings. 

The report and order to allow Dorchester Com- 
missioners to expend S1000 for plans and surveys, 
was passed, in concurrence— yeas eleven, nays 
none. 

The following orders were passed, in concur- 
rence : 

Order that the Committee on Bathing consider 
the expediency of establishing a bath house in 
Ward Thirteen. 

Order to pay bills of certain members of City 
Government. 

Order tor appointment of Members of Common 



FEBRUARY 



18 6 9 



24 



Council as special Police Officers, and for appro- 
priate baages. 

Order to limit said badges to new members 
only. 

DIRECTORS OF PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS. 

The report of Committee on Nominations was 
accepted in concurrence, and the Board proceeded 
to an election. 

Mr. Bradlee, ot the Committee, said he was au- 
thorized to withdraw the name of Hoilis It. Gray, 
nominated by the committee. 
The ballot for Directors resulted as follows: 

Whole number of votes 12 

Necessary to a choice 7 

Alderman Lewis liice 12 

Common Council — Wm. M. Flanders. .. .12 

Wm. Woolley li 

At large (3 years)— Sylvnnus A. Denio. . . 
Increase E. Noyes... 8 

Samuel C. Cobb 11 

W m. Seaver 6 

Geo. F. French 1 

T. W.Gould 1 

At large (1 year)— Geo. P. French 4 

Wm. Seaver 3 

Z. B. Heywood 1 

Alderman Rice, and Messrs. Flanders, Woolley, 
Denio, Noyes and Cobb were declared to be elec- 
ted, in concurrence, and for a Director for one 
year, to fill a vacancy occasioned by the death of 
F. C. Manning, there was no choice. 
Further batlotings resulted as follows : 

2d. 3d. 4th. 

Whole number 12 12 12 

Necessary to a choice 7 7 7 

William Seaver 4 3 3 

T. WarrenGould 4 3 3 

George P. French 4 5 S 

W. J. Seaver 1 

5th. 6th. 7fh. 

Whole number of votes 12 12 12 

Necessary to a choice 7 7 7 

George P". French 6 6 3 

Wm. Seaver 6 6 7 

Chas.E. Wiggir 2 

Mr. Seaver was declared elected for one year in 
non-concurrence. 

TRUSTEES OF MOUNT HOPE CEMETERY. 

The report of Committee to Nominate Trustees 
of Mount Hope Cemetery was accepted, in con- 
currence, and the election took place as follows: 

Whole number of votes 12 

Necessary to a choice 7 

Alderman— Edward A. White 11 

Common Council — Samuel B. Hopkins 9 

Edmund B. Vannevar 11 

E. Gray 1 

T. W. Gould 1 

Wm. Woolley 1 

At large— Jos. P. Paine 12 

Alderman White, and Messrs. Hopkins, Vanne- 
var and Paine were declared elected on the part of 
this Board. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF FIRE ALARMS. 

John F. Kennard was reelected by a unanimous 
vote. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF TUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

The order to appoint a joint committee to nomi- 
nate a Superintendent of Public Buildings was 
non-concurred in, when James C. Tucker was re- 
elected by a unanimous vote. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF HEALTH. 

Alderman Bradlee, from the Committee to nom- 
inate a candidate for Superintendent ot Health, 
reported that the Committee had been unable to 
agree. 

Three persons were recommended by different 
portions of the Committee, Charles K. Cutter by 
Alderman Bradlee and Councilman Young; Geo. 
W. Forristall by Alderman Fairbanks and Coun- 
cilman Jenks, and Lucius W. Knight by Council- 
man Osborn. 

An election of Superintendant of Health took 
place as follows : 

1st ballot. 2d. 3d. 4th 

Wh ole number of votes 12 12 32 12 

Necessary to a choice 7 7 7 7 

Geo. W. Forristall 5 6 5 7 

Lucius W. Knight 5 5 6 5 

Chas. R. Cutter 2 1 1 

Mr. Forristall was declared elected on the fourth 
ballot. 



Mr. Pratt, from the Committe to Nominate Can- 
didates for Trustees of the Public Library, made a 
report, and an election took place as follows: 

Whole number of votes 12 

Necessary to a choice 7 

Alderman— J. T. Bradlee 11 

Common Council — Wm. G. Harris 12 

Ja-mes M, Keith 12 

At Large— Wm. W . Greenough 12 

Jarvis D. Lraman 12 

The ab • ve named, the nominees of the Commit- 
tee, were declared to b*» elected. 

Alderman Hawe-, from the Committee to Nomi- 
nate a Citv Phvsician, reported as the candidate 
Dr. Wm. H.Page. 
An election took place as follows: 

1st ballot. 2d. 3d. 4th 

Whole number of votes 12 12 12 12 

Necessarv to a choice 7 7 7 7 

Wm. H . Page G G 6 7 

Wm. Bead 5 4 5 4 

Jos. S. Jones 1 2 1 1 

Dr. Page was declared elected. 

APPOINTMENTS MADE AND CONFIRMED. 

Under the order of the Common Council, the 
Mayor appointed the members of the Common 
Council special police officers, without pay. 

The following appointments were also made: 

POLICE OFFICERS. 

Police officers with all the power of consta- 
bles except the power of executing civil process: 
F. C. Nutting, Benjamin Proctor, Samuel Austin, 
Jr., William Gallagher, Samuel J. Lowell, W illiam 
J. Morey, Thomas Kyan, James M. Day, J. Sumner 
Gove, Emery A. Dresser, Daniel T. Sullivan, John 
C. Kelmm, Samuel Emerson, William C. Johnson, 
George W. Hathaway, Lewis H. Bonner, William 
Cumley, J. IS. Upham, Josiah W. Stetson, Dennis 
S. Dailey, Augustus Luce, John fl. F. Hout, James 
McCormick, Leonard M. Pike, John E. Knowlton, 
Francis Franklin, A. H. T. Simpson, A. K. Young 
and Edward B. Myers. 

Special Police Officers without Pay— James M. 
Douley, for duty at the Skating Kink; Charles 
Hibbard, for duty at the Morgan Chapel. 

The appointment of Geo. W. Thompson as driver 
of Hook and Ladder Co. No. 1 was confirmed, and 
numerous officers of Hose, Hook and Ladder 
companies, &c, were confirmed, as recommended 
by the Board of Engineers and the Mayor. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Mr. White, from the Committee on Licenses, re- 
ported in favor of a license on petition of 14. M. 
Field, for the Museum; of George M. Baker, to 
give a dramatic entertainment; oi James Redpatb, 
for lectures by Prof. Du Chailiu. Severally ac- 
cepted. 

The same Committee reported in favor of grant- 
ing license to A. S. Eaton, for two hack stands in 
Garden street; also in favor of sundry persons as 
victuallers. Severally accepted. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on 
Streets, reported no action necessary on sundry 
notices of intentions to build. Accepted. 

Alderman Van Nostrand, from the Committee 
on the Assessors' Department, on the order in re- 
lation to the election of three additional Asses- 
sors, reported an order amending the ordinance in 
relation to the assessment of taxes. The ordi- 
nance was read once. 

Alderman James, from the Committee on Pav- 
ing, on the petition of the Albany Street Freight 
Railway Co. Jor an extension of their location in 
Albany street, reported an order, which was 
passed, as follows : 

Ordered, That permission be and hereby is giv^n 
to the Albany Street Freight Railway Company to 
lay aown a single track on Albany street from 
East Brookline street to Hampden street, with the 
right from time to time to lay down such branch 
tracks to any wharf or wharves adjacent to said 
Albany street as the Committee on Paving may 
deem expedient. 

The right to lay down the tracks located by this 
order is upon the condition that the whole work 
of laying down the tracks, the precise location ot 
the same, and the form of rail to be used, shall be 
under the direction and to the satislaction of the 
Committee on Paving and the Superintendent of 
Streets, and shall be approved by tnem. Also upon 
the condition that the space between the rails and 
three feet outside thereof shall be paved with 



35 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



such kind and quality of pavement as the Superin- 
tendent of Streets shall direct. 

Also, upon the condition that the said Albany 
Street Freight Railway Company shall accept this 
order of location, and agree in writing to comply 
with the conditions therein contained, and file 
said acceptance and agreement with the City Clerk 
within twenty dajs of the date of its passage; otn- 
evwise it shall be null and void. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee to nomi- 
nate candidates for Superintendents of Bridges, 
made a report, as follows : 

Chelsea Street Bridge— Edward T. Stowers. 

Dover Street Bridge— Joseph Silvers. 

Federal Street Bridge— Jacob IS orris. 

Meridian Street Bridge — Abner Knight. 

Mount Washington Avenue Bridge— George H. 
Davis. 

The report was accepted and ordered to be sent 
down, and Monday next was assigned for election 
of Superintendents ot Bridges. 

Alderman White, from tne Committee on Health, 
on the petition of Jos. Dow, reported that they 
were unnble to see that any injustice had been 
done to the petitioner, and they accordingly re- 
ported that he have leave to withdraw. Accept- 
ed. 

The same Committee reported in favor of grant- 
ing leave to Eames & Tucker to erect a stable for 
more than four horses at 127 Brookline street. Ac- 
cepted. 

OEDERS OF NOTICE. 

On petition of Samuel West, for leave to main- 
tain a steam engine and boiler on Avon place. 
Hearing on Tuesday, Feb. 23, at 4 P. M. 

On petition of Owen Kussell, for leave to erect a 
stable fcr six horses at 103 Dedham street. Hear- 
ing, Monday, Feb. 8, 4 P. M. 

A petition was presented from Peter B. Brigham 
and others, that the order for the widening ot Han- 
over street be issued at once. Referred to the 
Committee on Streets. 

OBDEBS PASSED. 

Alderman Richards offered the following order, 
which was passed : 

Whereas, Archibald Smith, formerly a member 
of Engine Co. No. 8, was injured while in the dis- 
charge of his duty as a fireman of the city ot Bos- 
ton by being ruptured, 

Ordered, That there be allowed and paid toArch- 
ibald Smith the sum of §100 on account of injuries 
sustained while amember of the Fire Department, 
the same to be charged to the appropriation of 
Fire Department. 

Order to lay out Shoe and Leather street by fee 
name of John street. 

Order that the City Physician , with th<> concur- 
rence of the the Health Committee, be and he is 
hereby authorized to take such measures in regai d 



to causes or occurrence of danger to the public 
health as they may deem necessary and proper for 
its preservation. 

On motion of Alderman Talbot, 

Ordered, That the Committee on Laying-out and 
Widening Streets consider the expediency of lay- 
ing-out a new street, fortyfeet in width, from Har- 
rison avenue to Albany street, parallel with and 
two hundred feet from Dover street, over land be- 
longing to the city of Boston, and report at the 
next meeting of this Board. 

On motion of Alderman Rice, 

Ordered, That the Mayor be authorized to dis- 
charge the mortgage eriven to the city of Boston 
by Chas. H. Stedman and wife, on an estate in 
Dover street, dated March 25, 1861, and recorded 
with Suffolk deeds, liv. 795, fol. 59, the note for 
which said mortgage was given and the interest 
thereon having been fully paid. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF COMMON. 

The usual annual order was passed authorizing 
the Mayor to appoint a Superintendent of Common 
and Public Squares. 

Tbe Mayor, in accordance with the order, nomi- 
nated John Galvin as Superintendent ot Common 
and Public Squares, and the nomination was con- 
firmed. 

The report on the order of notice relative to the 
widening of Hanover street was taken up,when, on 
motion of Alderman Pratt, the petitioners for a 
delay in the widening ot said street had leave to 
withdraw. 

The report on salary of Church Street Commis- 
sioners, with the proposal to increase it to $2500, 
was taken from the files as unfinished business of 
1868, and recommitted to the Committee on the 
Church street district. 

The report of the Committee on Salaries was 
taken up, when additional amendments, proposed 
by Alderman James, from the Joint Special Com- 
mittee, were adopted, as tollows: 

A horse and vehicle for the use of the Mayor, to 
be charged to Incidentals. 

To the City Treasurer an increase of five hundred 
dollars per annum. 

To the City Auditor an increase of five hundred 
dollars per annum. 

To the City Clerk an increase of five hundred 
dollars per annum. 

To the Treasurer, for clerk hire, an increase of 
two hundred dollars. 

To the Secretary of the Board of Engineers an 
increase of two hundred dollars per annum. 

On motion of Alderman Shaver the salary of the 
Superintendent of Faneuil Hall Market was in- 
creased $200. 

The report was again laid on the table, and or- 
dered to be printed. 

Adjourned, 



26 



COMMON COUNCIL 



CITY OF BOSTON. 

Proceeding's of the Common Council, 

FEB. 4, 1869. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Common 
Council was held at 7% o'clock this evening, Wm. 
G. Harris, the .President, presiding. 

PAPERS FKOM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

The reports of the City Registrar and of the 
Trustees of the City Hospital were placed on file. 

The petitions of sundry person* tor the purchase 
of the East Boston Ferry property, and of Abby 
"Welch and Bridget O'Brien severally ior compen- 
sation for injuries in the streets, were referred in 
concurrence. 

The certificates of election of various city offi- 
cers by the Board of Aldermen were received, and 
elections took place as follows: 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

Messrs. Wilkins of Ward Nine, Emerson of 
"Ward Six and Going of Ward Three were appoint- 
ed a committee to receive, sort and count the votes 
for a Superintendent of Public Buildings. The 
committee reported as follows : 

Whole number of votes 58 

Necessarvto a choice 30 

James C. Tucker 55 

J. L. Boss 3 

Mr. Tucker was declared to be elected, in con- 
currence. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF FIRE ALARMS. 

Messrs. Butler of Ward Ten, Nelson of Ward 
Nine, and Johnson of Ward Twelve were appoint- 
ed a committee to receive, sort and count the votes 
for Superintendent of Fire Alarms. 
The committee reported as follows : 

Whole number of votes 52 

Necessary to a. choice 27 

John F. Kennard 52 

Mr. Kennard was declared to be elected, in con- 
currence. 

TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

The report of the committee to nominate Trus- 
tees of the Public Library was accepted, in con- 
currence. 

The election of Trustees of the Public Library 
was taken up, and Messrs. Gray of Ward Twelve, 
Malone of Ward Two and Braman of Ward Six 
were appointed a committee to receive, sort and 
count the votes. 

The committee reported the result as follows : 

Whole number of votes 58 

Necessary to a choice 30 

Alderman— J. T. Bradlee 56 

Common Council — Wm. G. Harris 51 

James M. Keith 32 

Geo. P. Denny 28 

Sidney Squires 2 

At Large — Wm. W. Greenough 54 

Jarvis £>. Braman 48 

Edward E.Hale 12 

Alderman Bradlee, Councilmen Harris and 
Keith, and Messrs. Greenough and Braman, were 
declared to oe elected, in concurrence. 

TRUSTEES OF MOUNT HOPE CEMETERY. 

It was voted to proceed to the election of Trus- 
tees of Mount Hope Cemetery, and Messrs. Wil- 
kins of Ward Nine, Judson of Ward Fourteen and 
Crowley of Ward Seven were appointed a com- 
mittee to receive, sort and count the votes. 
The committee reported as follows: 

Whole number of votes 58 

Necessary to a choice 30 

Aldermen — Edward A. White 44 

Newton Talbot 11 

F. Richards 1 

W. E. Hawes 1 

J.T. Bradlee 1 



Common Council— Samuel B. Hopkins.. 50 
Edm'd B. Vannevar. .57 
J. K. Crowley. . . ...... 1 

F. A. Osborn 2 

At large— Jo=eph P. Paine 36 

Isaac Palmer 8 

Henry W. Wilson 2 

Horace Jenkins 14 

DIRECTORS OF TUBLIC INSTITUTIONS. 

The certificate of the election of Wm. Seaver as 
a Director for Public Institutions, in the place of 
T. Warren Gould, chosen by the Common Council, 
was read. 

The Council proceeded to an election, and 
Messrs. Tucker of Ward Six, Wilkins of Ward 
Nine and Young of Ward One were aupointed a 
committee to receive, sort and count the votes. 

The committee reported as follows : 

Whole number of votes 58 

Necessary to a choice. 30 

Geo. P. French 34 

vvm. Seaver 19 

T. Warren Gould 4 

Henry Warren 1 

Mr. French was declared to be elected, in non- 
concurrence. 

The following orders were passed, in concur- 
rence: 

Order to pay Archibald Smith $100, on account 
or injuries sustained while a member of the Fire 
Department. 

Order to take from the files the subject of raising 
the salaries of the Church Street Commissioners, 
and refer the same to the Committee on the Church 
Street District. 

The following matters were referred, in concur- 
rence : 

Reference to the Committee on Public Building's 
of the order authorizing repairs on Engine House 
No. 13. 

Reference to the Committee on Printing of the 
order coi'cerning "Cushing's Parliamentary Law 
and Practice." 

CITY PHYSICIAN. 

The report of the Committee to Nominate a City 
Physician was accepted, in concurrence, and a 
motion was made to go into an election. 

Mr. Batchelder of Ward Four inquired of the 
committee the reason why Dr. R. j ad was dropped, 
since he had discharged bis duties faithfully. 

Mr. Hobos of Ward fourteen, of the committee, 
stated in reply that Dr. Page was the unanimous 
nomination of the committee, who had fully con- 
sidered the subject. 

Messrs. Hob'hs oi Ward Fourteen, Braman of 
Ward Six and Noyes of Ward Five were appoint- 
ed a committee to receive, sort and count the 
votes for City Physician. 

The committee reported as follows: 

Whole number of votes 59 

N ecessary to a choice 30 

William Read 27 

William H. Page 28 

F. A. Bundy. 2 

Joseph S. Jones 2 

A second ballot was as follows : 

Whole number of votes 59 

Necessary to a choice 30 

William Read 30 

William H. Page 28 

Joseph S. Jones 1 

Dr. Read was declared to be elected, in non-con- 
currence. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF HEALTH. 

The report of the Committee to nominate a Super- 
intendent of Health was accepted, in concurrence, 
and it was voted to proceed to an election. 

Messrs. Pickering ot Ward Fourteen, Batchelder 
of Ward Four and KingsLury o f Ward Fifteen 
were appointed a committee to receive, sort and 
count the votes. 

The committee reported as follows: 

Whole number of votes 59 

Necessary to a choice 30 

Geo. W. Forristall 25 

Chas. R. Cutter 7 

Lucius W. Knight 27 

Mr. Flynn of Ward Seven said he had been re- 
quested by Mr. Cutter to withdrew his name. 



FEBRUARY 4, 1869. 



27 



A second ballot resulted as follows : 

Whole number of votes 59 

Necessary to a choice 30 

George W. Forristall 28 

Lucius W. Knight 31 

Mr. Knight was elected, in non-concurrence with 
the Board of Aldermen. 

The report of the Committee to nominate Super- 
intendents of Bridges was accepted, in concur- 
rence. 

ENGINEERS OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

The report of the Committee to nominate Engi- 
neers tor the Fire Department was accepted, in 
concurrence, and the "Council proceeded to an 
election. 

Messrs. Tucker ot Ward Six, Woolley of Ward 
One and Wilkins of Ward Nine were appointed a 
committee to receive, sort and count the votes for 
Chief Engineer ot the Fire Department. 
The Committee reported as follows: 

Whole number of votes 58 

Necessary to a choice 3(J 

John S. Damrell 55 

R. J. Fennelly 1 

George P. Darrow 1 

David Cbaniberlin 1 

John S. Damrell was declared to be elected. 
The same committee were appointed to receive, 
sort and count the votes for Assistant Engineers. 
The committee reported as follows: 

Whole number of votes 57 

Necessary to a choice 29 

John S. Jacobs 57 

John W. Kegan 57 

David Chamberlin 43 

Zenas E. Smith 54 

Geo. Brown 39 

Joseph Dunbar .> 57 

William A. Green 56 

Elijah B. Hine 57 

Phmeas D. Allen 57 

James Munroe 51 

John Culligan 29 

Rufus B. Farrar 55 

Geo. White 28 

Win 1 . H. Cunningham 21 

Thomas Braunon 9 

Samuel D. Harrington 8 

Mssrs. Jacobs, Regan, Chamberlin, Smith, 
Brown, Dunbar, Green, Hine, Allen, Munroe, Cul- 
ligan and Farrar, all members of the old Board, 
were declared to be elected and all ot them ou the 
ticket regularly nominated. 

The non-concurrence in the order for a commit- 
tee to nominate a Superintendent of Public Build- 



ings was ordered to be placed on file, an election 
having taken place. 

A certificate of the appointment of the members 
of the Common Council as special police officers, 
without pay, was ordered to be placed on file. 

WATER BOARD. 

The report of the committee to nominate a Co- 
chituate Water Board was taken from the table, 
the rules having been suspended for that purpose, 
on motion of Mr. Snow of Ward Eleven, and it was 
voted to proceed to an election. 

Messrs. Snow of Ward Eleven, Cole ot Ward 
Five and Daniels of Ward Four were appointed a 
committee to receive, sort and count the votes. 

The committee reported as follows : 

Whole number of votes 59 

Necessary to a choice 30 

Alderman — Benjamin James 59 

Common Council— Alex. Wadsworth 27 

Lyman A. Belknap. . .26 

F. A. Osborn 28 

Sidney Squires 16 

M. F. Wells 12 

Thos. Dinsraore I 

At Large— Nathaniel J. Bradlee 56 

Charles R. Train 37 

Charles H. Allen 21 

Charles H. Train 1 

Sidney Squires 1 

Alderman James, and Messrs. N. J. Bradlee and 
Charles R. Train, at large, were declared to be 
elected. 

A second ballot, for members on the part of the 
Common Council, resulted as follows : 

Whole number of votes 58 

Necessary to a choice 30 

F. A. Osborn 33 

Lyman A.Belknap 28 

Alexander Wadsworth 27 

Sidney Squires 8 

M. F. Wells---- -11 

Mr. Osborn was declared elected, and there was 
one vacancy. 

Messrs. Squires and Wells withdrew their names 
as candidates. 

A third ballot to fill the remaining vacancy re- 
sulted as follows : 

Whole number of votes 56 

Necessary to a choice • 29 

Alexander Wadsworth 29 

Lyman A. Belknap 27 

Mr. Wadsworth was declared elected. 
Adjourned. 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



28 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 
FEB. 8, 1869. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Board of Al- 
dermen was held this afternoon, at four o'clock, 
Alderman James, Chairman of the Board, presid- 
ing. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

C. R- Classen and others, that an alarm bell be 
placed on I he grain elevator of the Boston & Al- 
bany Railroad Company on Chandler street. Re- 
ferred to Committee on Fire Alarms. 

Maria O'Malley, to be compensated for personal 
injuries sustained by a tall in Harrison avenue. 
Reierredto Committee on Claims. 

Thos. Manning and others, for the grading of Q 
street, from Broadway to First street. 

John Mull ay, for the grade of Newman street. 

N. F. Borry, for the grade of Newman street. 

Wm. C. Poland and others, that Maiden street be 
paved. 

Lemuel A.Coolidge and others, to be paid for 
damages caused oy change of grade of Canton 
street. 

W. E. Hicks, to be paid for grade damages on 
Shawmut avenue. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Paving. 

Clement Willis, for apportionment of betterment 
on High street into three parts. 

diaries H. Hersey and others, that Athens 
street, between B and C streets, be laid out as a 
highway. 

Edwin Adams, to be compensated for loss and 
damage caused by incerference with h.s intention 
to build on Harrison avenue and Indiana street in 
June last. 

Alvin Adams and 52 others, and Cyrus Wakefield 
and 93 others, for extension of Devonshire street 
to Hanover street. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Streets. 

Company F, First Massachusetts Infantry, for a 
new armory. Referred to Committee on Armories. 

J. Harvey Young, Nathaniel C. Nash, and 32 oth- 
ers, that the Public Library reading room may 
be opened on Sunday afternoons and evenings. 
Referred to Committee on Public Library. 

C. D. Coob & Brotuers and 30 others, Zenas 
Snow, Ryder & Hardy and 27 others, mercantile 
houses. Cornelius Lovell and 39 others of East 
Boston, John H. Weston and 56 others of East 
Boston, for the purchase of the property of the 
East Boston Ferry 'Jompany by the city. Referred 
to the Committee on Ferries. 

The petition of Bridget Gallagher and eleven 
other women, representing themselves as orderly 
and law abiding, respectfully requested that the 
permits which have been kindljr granted to them 
for the purpose of maintaining fruit stands at the 
places designated in said permits, was indorsed by 
J. C. Tyler & Co. and about fifty others, importers 
and wholesale dealers in fruits, who express the 
belief that the convenience of many in the com- 
munity is met by this trade, and also the comfort- 
able support of families dependent upon said peti- 
tioners will be the result of granting this petition, 
without any evil resulting therefrom. Referred to 
Committee on Police. 

NOTICES OF INTENTION TO BUILD. 

S. J. & G. Tuttle, 170Tremont street; F. Rose, 
corner ot Warren street and Stanmore place; 
Henry P. Wilson, corner of Causeway and Merri- 
mac streets; I. & H. M. Harmon, 37 Marlborough 
street; C. K. Kirby. 24 and 26 Hancocls street; P. 
J. Hughes, 9 and 11 Milford 6treet; Wm. Glass, 
Newman street, between Lowland and Dorchester 
streets; Joseph Wagner, Sixth street, between B 
and C streets; Nathaniel Adams, corner of Wash- 
ington and Essex streets ; John Mullay, JSewman 
street, between Lowland and Dorchester streets; 
J. H. Milhgan. 307 Federal street; Chas. Simmons, 
corner of Sumner and Border; J. H. Midigan, 
Fourth street, between C and D streets; J. L. 
Roberts, Anderson street, also on West Cedar 



street; E. C. Drew and others, on Harrison ave- 
nue, opposite Hamburg street. 

CITY CLERK'S QUARTERLY REPORT. 

The report of the city clerk, for the quarter end- 
ing Jan. 31, 18f'.9, was received and ordered to be 
sent down. The statement is as follows: 
Received for recording mortgages of per- 
sonal property, liens, &c $448 89 

For use of Faneuil Hall in 1868 150 00 

For licenses of auctioneers 50 00 

For licenses of intelligence offices 5 00 

For licenses of billiard rooms 67 00 

Record ot goods found 25 

Total $721 25 

All of which has been paid into tDe City Treas- 
ury. 

OVERSEERS OF THE POOR'S QUARTERLY REPORT. 

The report of the ISoard of Overseers of the Poor 
ot the city, for the quarter ending Jan. 31, 1869, 
gave the following statements of the receipts and 
expenditures. 

Cash on hand Oct. 31, 1868 $2,653 35 

Draft on City Treasurer 15,000 00 

Cash from cities and towns . . 1,720 75 

Total $19,374 10 

The expenditures were as follows : 

Paid for burials $653 25 

" cities and town for relief of Boston 

poor 115 37 

" expenses City Temporary Home 2,892 68 

" pensions and grants at office 3,506 00 

" immediate relief of persons having 

no settlement 164 42 

" tor coal 2,260 70 

" <or groceries 3,017 70 

" salary of Secretary 500 00 

" of BooK-keeper 375 OS 

" of Clerk 137 50' 

" " ofVisitors 900 00 

" office expenses 79 95 

" transportation 1114 

" for account of the State and 

charged 17 50 

Total expenditures $15,231 21 

Cash balance Jan. 31, 1869 4,139 89 

Read and accepted and sent down. 

AUDITOR'S MONTHLY EXHIBIT. 

The monthly exhibit of the Auditor of Accounts 
was presented, being an exhibit of the General 
and Special Appropriations for the present finan- 
cial year of 1868-69, as shown in the books in his 
office, February 1, 1869, including the February 
Draff, being ten months' payment of the financial 
year, exhibiting the original appropriations, the 
amount expended, and the balances of each un- 
ei pended at that date. 

A recapitulation of the exhibit shows the follow- 
ing reoult: 

Appropriations, 

Revenues, &c. Expended. Unexpended. 
General. .$7,127,704 72 $5,648,99170 $1,478,773 02 
Special... 4,463,458 88 2,725 400 18 1,738,058 70 

$11,591,223 60 $8,374,391 88 $3,216,831 72 
Accepted ani ordered to be sent down. 

EXTENSION OF BROADWAY. 

The hearing on the order ot notice relative to 
the extension of Broadway was taken up, when 
the following remonstrance was presented: 

"We have received your order o( notice under 
date of Jan. 25, 1869, relative to the extension of 
Broadway. Inasmuch as the projected extension 
would destroy the present most convenient ar- 
rangement of our workshops, and seriously dam- 
age our business, we respectfully protest against 
it. Your obedient servants, 

South Boston Iron Co., 

By Wm. P. Hunt, Treasurer." 

The remonstrance was ordered to be placed on 
file. 

Mr. Thayer appeared in behalf of R. Hoe & 
Company, manufacturers of printing presses, and 
objected to the extension of Broadway, on the 
ground that it would be a great injury to their 
business by being obliged to remove. They came to 
Boston and bought out the establishment of Adams 
& Co., and had expended a considerable sum of 
money in putting the buildings in order, which, 



39 



BOARD OF AL13ERMEN, 



though not ol' great value, were very convenient 
lor the business. The damage to that business by 
cutting through the workshops would be not less 
than $50,000. 

As a further consideration, the removal might 
necessitate the consolidation of this branch of 
their business with their main business in New 
York. At the present time, three-filths of the 
manufacture gees out of New England. The compa- 
ny are now employing 125 hands, to whom are paid 
some $2000 a week, and for the many boys in their 
employment, they provided an evening school. In 
conclusion, it was urged that it should be consid- 
ered for the interest ot Boston to keep such a 
business here. 

The report was recommitted to the Committee 
on Streets. 

The hearing on notice of Mirk Dswlini, of in- 
tention to build on West street, thab the city pro- 
posed to widen said street, was tiken up. No per- 
son appearing to oppose said widening, the report 
was recommitted. 

The order of notice on petition if Owen Russell, 
lor leave to build a stable for six horses, in the 
rear of 10;3 Dedbam street, was taken up. 

No person appearing in opposition, a report was 
made by Alderman White, from The Committee on 
Licenses, in favor of granting said petition. Ac- 
cepted. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

The following orders were read a second time 
and passed : 

Order to pay Michael Holden §3881 lor Oliver 
street; damages— $3218 as the award of the Board ot 
Aldermen, and $002 01 as interest. 

Order to pay Thomas Austin's heirs $5222 75 for 
Oliver street (formerly Belmont street) damages — 
$4284 50 as awarded, $880 50 and the balance, 
$00 09, received for old buddings. 

Order to pay Benjamin Hooley and Aaron W. 
Kussell $11,000 for Federal street damages. 

The ordinance to amend an ordinance in relation 
to taxes, so as to increase the number of assistant 
assessors from sixteen to nineteen, was read a sec- 
ond time and passed. 

COMMON COUNCIL PAPERS. 

Petitions from the Common Council were re- 
ferred in concurrence. 

The elections of various officers by the Common 
Council, in which the Council had non-concurred, 
or in which action in that branch was first taken, 
were taken up. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF HEALTH. 

The election of Geo. W. Forristall, as Superin- 
tendent of Health, coming up non-concurred in. 
the Board proceeded to an election, as follows: 

Whole number of votes 12 

Necessary to a choice 7 

George W. Forristall 

Lucius W. Knight 5 

And there was one ballot for Abner Knight. 
The second ballot was as follows : 

Whole number of votes 12 

Necessary to a choice 7 

George W. Forristall 7 

Lucius W. Knight 5 

Mr. Forristall was again declared to be elected, 
in non-concurrence. 

CITY PHYSICIAN. 

The election of City Physician was taken up, the 
Common Council having" non-concurred with this 
Board in electing Dr. Wm. Kead. 

Alderman Bradlee presented a petition in favor 
of the election ol Dr. Kead, as follows: 

"The undersigned, physicians or Boston,beg leave 
respectfully to state, that in their belief the pres- 
ent incumbent of the office of City Physician has 
performed its duties in a faithful, able and efficient 
manner, and also that the best interests of the city 
will be consulted by retaining him in the office he 
has so well filled." 

Signed by George C. Shattuck, Henry J. Bige- 
low, and some thirty others, physicians and sur- 
geons connected with the Massachusetts General 
Hospital, the City Hospital, Eye and Ear Infirma- 
ry, and City Dispensary. 

The petition was ordered to be sent down. 

The Board proceeded to the election of a City 
Physician. 

The ballotings resulted as follows: 



12 


12 


7 


7 


5 


5 


5 


5 


2 


2 


5th 


Gth 


12 


12 


7 


7 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 



1st 2d 3d 

Whole number of votes 12 

Necessary to a choice 7 

Wm. Uead 

Wm. H. Page 3 

Jos. S. Jones 3 

4th 

Whole number of votes 12 

Necessary to a choice 7 

Wm. Uead 4 

Wm. H. Pa&'c 5 

Jos. S. Jones 3 

On motion of Alderman Kichards the further 
consideration of the subject was laid on the table. 

ENGINEERS OF THE FTRE DEPARTMENT. 

The balloting for Chief Engineer ot the Fire 
Department, resulted as follows: 

Whole number of votes 12 

Necessary to a choice 7 

John S.*Dainrell 11 

Ceo. W. Forristall 1 

The balloting for Assistant Engineers was as 
follows: 

Whole number of votes 12 

IS ecessary to a choice 7 

John S. Jacobs II 

John W. Began 11 

David Chamberlin 11 

Zenas E. Smith 12 

George Brown 11 

Joseph Dunbar 11 

William A. Green 12 

Elijah B. Hine 12 

Phineas D.Allen 12 

James Munroe 12 

John Culligan 9 

EuIue B. Farrar 12 

W. H. Cunningham 5 

George White 3 

John S. Damrell, as Chief Engineer, and Messrs. 
Jacobs, Kegan, Chamberlin, Smith, Brown, Dun- 
bar, Green, Hine, Allen, Munroe, Culligan and 
Farrar, as Assistant Engineers, were declared, to 
oe elected, in concurrence. 

COCHITUATE WATER BOAED. 

The report of Committee to nominate a Water 
Board was accepted, in concurrence, and the elec- 
tion of a Water Board was taken up. 
The result of the election was as follows: 

Whole number of votes 12 

Necessary to a choice 7 

Alderman— Benjamin James 12 

Common Council— Lyman A. Belknap... 10 
Francis A. Osborn... 

Alex. Wadsworth 4 

Sidney Squires 1 

At large— Nath'l. J. Bradlee 12 

Chas. H.Allen 6 

Chas. P. Train 

A second ballot, for the election of one member 
from the Common Council and one at large, re- 
sulted as follows: 

Whole number of votes 12 

Necessary to a choice.. 7 

Common Council — Francis A. osborn. ... 9 

Lyman A. Belknap 2 

Alexander Wadsworth. 1 

At Large— Charles H. Allen. 6 

Charles It. Train 5 

A third ballot for one member of the Board, at 
large, resulted as lollows: 

Whole number of votes 12 

Necessary to a choice 7 

Charles H. Allen 7 

Charles R. Tram 5 

Alderman James and Messrs. Osborn and Brad- 
lee were declared to be elected in concurrence, 
and Lyman A. Belknap and Chas. H. Allen in non- 
concurrence. 

The election of Director for Public institutions, 
to till a vacancy, took place, with the following re- 
sult: 

Whole number of vo'es 12 

Necessary to a choice 7 

Wm. Seaver 8 

George Jf . French 4 

Mr. Seaver was again elected, in nonconcur- 
rence. 



FEBRUAKY 



18 6 9. 



30 



SUPERINTENDENTS OF BRIDGES. 

The election of Superintendents of Bridges was 
taken up by special assignment. 

Superintendent of Meridian Street Bridge. The 
whoie number ot votes was J2, all of which were 
lor Abner Knight 

Siip'rint.'ridint of Fe'ljrnt Sirael Bridge. The 
whole number of votes was 12, all ot which were 
lor Jacob Norris. 

Stiperintendr.nl. nf Dover Street Bridge. The elec- 
tion of Supeiietendent of Dover street bridge was 
taken up. 

Alderman Seaver said he saw no reason why Mr. 
Brown, the old Superintendent, should not be re- 
elected, since he had been faithful in thediscuarge 
o< his duties. 

Alderman Hawes said Mr. Brown told him some 
time since thac he snould not be a candidate tor 
reflection, as the office did not pay. He had sinoe 
the nomination was made ivy the committee de- 
clared hiinseh to he a canuidate lor reelection, and 
Uiere was no objection to him. 

Alderman lalbot -aid it was understood that Mr. 
Brown did not want the office unless the pay was 
raised. The nominal ion by the Committee was 
not unanimous, and it was not agreed to make 
it so. 

The result of the election was as follows : 

Whole number of votes 12 

IN ecessary to a choice 1 

JSathan Brown u 

Joseph Silvera 1 

Richard Cook 1 

Martin Kussell 1 

Superintendent of Mount Washington Avenue 
Bridge. The whole number of votes was 12, all ot 
vvbich were lor George H. Davis. 

Superintendent of Chelsea Street Bridge. The 
whole number of votes was 11, all ol which were 
lor Edward S. Stowers. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Alderman White, from the Committee on Li- 
censes, reported in favor of granting several li- 
censes as auctioneers, victuallers, wagon Jicenses, 
and dealers m second-hand articles. Severally ac- 
cepted. 

Alderman White reported also in favor of a 
license to theVoung Men's Christian Union to give 
a concert ac 200 Washington street on the 13th of 
February; to T. P. Collins, to exhibit a Scereopti- 
con at Oiiickering Hall; to Win. P. Sargent for a 
Velocipede tjink at Boylston Hall, and to exhibit 
a velocipede at 334 Washington street; to Geo. W. 
Lindsey lor a Velocipede Kink at ilevere Hall; to 
Pearl <& Co. lor a Velocipede Exhibition at Sum- 
ner Hall, severally accepted. 

The same committee reported leave to withdraw 
on petition ol Barzillai T.* Folger, tor the sale of 
articles at the corner of Wasmngton street and 
Temple place, and of Edward Milliar, for the sale 
ol articles i" the streets. Accepted. 

The same Committee reported in tavor of licens- 
ing six newsboys, one bootblack, one boy to sell 
shoe-lacings, and lor the renewal of twenty-three 
licenses, as bootblacks. Accepted. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on 
Streets, reported no action necessaiy on sundry 
notices of intention to build. Accepted. 

Alderman Bradlee made a report in relation to 
the removal of snow from the sidewalks, in which 
it was stated that by a decision of the Supreme 
Court, the present ordinance was defective. An 
ordinance was reported iiy him to amend an 
ordinaace in relation to streets. Bead twice and 
passed. 

Alderman Richards, from the Committee on 
Paving, submitted the following report: 

The Committee on Paving respectfully report to 
the City Council tt-at an additional appropriation 
of $25,060 will be required to meet the wants of 
the Paving Department during the remainder of 
the financial year. 

In October, 1868, a request was made for $100,- 
000; but as this amount could not at that time be 
granted without resorting to a loan, it was deemed 
expedient by tne City Council to appropriate but 
$75,000, with the understanding that the balance 
should be provided before the end of the financial 
year, when the Auditor of Accounts would be able 
to make transfers from unexpended appropria- 
tions. 

The appropriation made at that time is now ex- 



hausted, and the sum of $25,000 will be wanted for 

the following purposes, viz: 

For pay-rolls of men employed on the 

streets and ledge at Roxbury $18,000 

For team work, iron and steel for tools, 

lumber, etc 7,000 

$25,000 

lour committee respectfully recommend that 
the Committee on Finance be authorized to pro- 
vide the means to meet the required amount. 
Benjamin James, ) 
Francis Richards, \ Committee. 
Lewis Rice, ) 

Referred to the Committee on Finance. 

Alderman Richards, trom tne Committee on 
Public Buildings, submitted the following report: 

The Committee on Public Buildings would re- 
spectfully represent that there will be needed an 
additional appropriation ot ten thousand dollars, 
to defray the ordinary expenses of the grammar 
school building department lor the remainder of 
the financial year. 

The amount appropriated for this department at 
the beginning 01 the year was ninety thousand 
dollars, which has been expended as follows, viz.: 

Carpentry $7,632 17 

Masonry 4,-120 11 

Whitewashing 3,37s 20 

Painting 7,417 01 

Furniture 8,089 53 

Plumbing and gas fitting i,loo 17 

Roofing 450 42 

Iron wo rk 397 32 

Locks and keys 929 58 

Heating apparatus 9,32127 

Gas and water 189 08 

Rents 1.334 50 

Janitors 16,52156 

Fuel 21,48115 

Supplies 1,:J63 87 

Blackboards ] ,794 52 

Incidentals 2,518 97 

Filling and grading 1,529 75 

$89,989 78 
10 22 



Balance on hand 



$90,000 00 
The amount asked for includes the amounts 
needed to pay the following hills : 

Janitors' roll. $4,000 00 

Radiators for Lawrence Schooll ouse, 
orderjd by City Council in Novem- 
ber, 1868 2,000 00 

Fuel 3,000 00 

Ordinary repairs and supplies 1,000 00 



$10,000 00 
For the Committee, 
Francis Richards, Chairman. 

Referred to the Committee on Finance. 

Alderman Richards, from the same committee, 
on the petition of David Bloch for a renewal of the 
lease ot the Bridge estate on Court street, reported 
inexpedient to grant a renewal ot said lease. Ac- 
cepted and sent down. 

Alderman Seaver, from the Committee on 
Bridges, submitted a report, as follows: 

The Committee on Bridges beg leave to repre- 
sent that an additional appropriation ot twelve 
hundred dollars will be required tc meet the or- 
dinary expenses of their department during the 
remainder of the financial year. 

There has been expended during the year, in- 
cluding the February draft, 

For Salaries, Superintendents $4,436 10 

Repairs 9,002 80 

Oil, fuel, and small items 543 91 

Forage, etc., for horse at Federal street 

Bridge 294 10 

Expenses of Committee and carriage hire 446 80 



Balance unexpended. 



$14,723 71 
276 29 



Appropriation, 1868-69 $15,000 00 

The amount required will be, 

For salaries, say $866 67 

Repairs 550 00 

Small supplies 59 62 



Total $1,176 29 



31 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



Deduct balance unexpended 276 29 



Making the amount asked for $1,200 00 

.Respectfully submitted, 
For the Committee, 

Nathaniel Seaver, Chairman. 

Referred to the Committee on Finance. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on Streets, 
reported reference on petition ot Association for 
the Relief of Aged Women relative to obstruc- 
tions in Revere street, to the Committee on Pav- 
ing. Accepted. 

Alderman Talbot, from the same committee, re- 
ported orders in relation to betterments for the 
widening of Matthews street, dividing better- 
ments assessed on Nathan Matthews and David 
Snow into three parts. Also on betterment as- 
sessed on Charles G. Putnam, or heirs of F. W. P. 
Greenwood, for the widening of Temple place, an 
order dividing said betterment into three parts. 
Severally passed. 

Alderman Richards, irom the Committee on Pav- 
ing, reported an order for establishing the grade of 
Avon place, in accordance with plans ana profile 
of the City Surveyor, made by him Dec. 30, 1868, 
and on file in his office. Read twice and passed 

PAY OF POLICE. 

Alderman Seaver, irom the Committee on Po- 
lice, to whom was referred the petitions of the 
officers and patrolmen of the police force, that 
their pay may be increased, having carefully con- 
sidered the subject, bee: leave to report 
that the petitioners have leave to with- 
draw, for the reason that the present pay 
of patrolmen in this city is $100 per an- 
num higher than the average pay in other cities in 
the United States; and also, that there are over 
800 applications for appointment now on tile in 
the Mayor'.s office, including the names ol many 
first class mechanics. Accepted. 

OEDEES OF NOTICE. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on 
Streets, reported an oraer for the laying out of a 
street forty feet in width, from Harrison avenue 
to Albany street, parallel with Dover street and 
200 feet from said street, and an order of notice 
thereon, with a hearing to parties interested, Tues- 
day, Feb 23, at 4 P. M. 

Aldei man Talbot also reported an order of no- 
tice to Wm. Richardson and others, on a proposed 
widening of Harrison avenue. Hearing luesday, 
Feb. 23,4 P.M. 

Alderman Richards, from the Committee on 
Sewers, reported an order of notice on the pro- 
posed rebuilding of the sewer in Tremont street, 
between Warrenton street and Common street. 
Hearing Monday next, 4 P. M. 

Alderman Hawes, from the Committee to nomi- 
nate a harbor Master, made a report nominating 
John T. Gardner as a candidate for reelection to 
that office. Thomas Dinsmore, of the Committee, 
dissented, and recommended Martin W.Tewks- 
Imry. Read, accepted and sent down. 

Alderman White offered an order that a special 
committee, to be joined, be appointed to nominate 
candidates to fill vacancies in the Board of Over- 
seers of the Poor. Aldermen White and Fair- 
banks were appointed. 

On motion of Alderman Pratt, the notice to quit 
to tenants on the line of widening Hanover street, 
on or before 1st May next, was taaen from the 
table and passed. 

A notice was received from the Commissioners 
on the Salem Turnnike and Chelsea bridge corpora- 
tions, relative to apportionment of expenses for 
their support. On this it was 

Ordered, That the Joint Special Committee upon 
Legislative Matters be authorized to appear in be- 
half of this city before the Commissioners on Sa- 
lem Turnpike and Chelsea Bridges, on the 6th of 
March next, and protect the interests of this city 
in the premises. 

ORDERS PASSED. 

On motion of Alderman Rice, 

Ordered, That His Honor the Mayor be author- 
ised to discharge the mortgage given to the city 
i f Roxbury by John. R. Howard, the 18th of May, 
1855, and lecorcled with Norfolk deeds, lib. 236, fol. 



285, the note for which said mortgage was given 
having been fully paid. 

On motion of Alderman Talbot, an order was 
passed for the widening of West street, by taking 
a parcel of land belonging to Mary B. Parkman, 
of Elizabeeh C. Ware, of Frederick H. Bradlee and 
of persons unknown, amounting in all to 133 square 
feet, the expense thereof amounting to $1800. 

It was voted to proceed to the election of other 
officers not yet acted upon, and elections took place 
as lollows : 

CITY SURVEYOR. 

The whole number of votes was 12, all of which 
were for Thos. W. Davis. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 

The whole number of votes was 12, all of which 
were for Charles Harris. 

CITY MESSENGER. 

The whole number of votes was 12, eleven of 
which were for Oliver H. Spurr, and one for George 
Darrow. 

CITY SOLICITOR. 

Whole number of votes 12, eleven of which were 
for John P. Healy amd one for A. A. Ranney. 

CLERK OF COMMITTEES. 

The whole num'.ier of votes was twelve, all ot 
which were for James M. Bugbee. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SEWERS. 

The whole number of votes was twelve, eleven of 
which were tor Wm. H. Bradley, and one for Hen- 
ry VV. Wilson. 

CITY REGISTRAR. 

The whole number of votes was 12, all of which 
were for N. A. Apollonio. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF LANDS. 

The whole number of votes was 12, all of which 
were for Robert W. HaU. 

"WATER, REGISTRAR. 

The whole number of votes was 12, all of which 
were for William F. Davis. 

CITY PHYSICIAN. 

On motion of Alderman Richards the election of 
City Physician was again taken up, and ballot- 
ings took place as lollows: 

7th ballot. 8th. 

Whole number of votes 12 12 

Necessary to a choice 7 7 

Wm. Read 3 3 

Wm. H. f age 3 3 

Jos. S. Jones 6 6 

There being no choice, on motion of Alderman 
Richards the election was again laid or. the table. 

PORT PHYSICIAN. 

The election of Port Physician was taken up, 
and resulted in the election of Samuel H. Durgin, 
who received all tne votes cast. 

HARBOR MASTER. 

The vote for Harbor Master resulted as follows: 

Whole number of votes 12 

Necessary tor a choice 7 

Michael J . Driscoll 7 

John T. Gardner 4 

M . W. Te wksbury 1 

SALARY BILL. 

On motion of Alderman Richards, the Salary bill 
was taken from the table. 

On motion of the same Alderman, the salaries of 
the Assistant City Solicitors were fixed at the same 
rate, $2500. 

On motion of Alderman White, $200 was added 
to the allowance of the City Treasurer lor clerk 
hire. 

On motion of Alderman Richards, the considera- 
tion ot the Salary bill was assigned to Monday 
next, 5 o'clock. 

The report and order for the extension of Hook 
and Ladder House No. 4 over Eustis street ceme- 
tery, was taken from the files of 18G8, and on mo- 
tion of Alderman Richards was referred to the 
Committee on Public Buildings. 

Adjourned. 



32 



COMMON COUNCIL 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 

FEB. 11, 1869. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Common 
Council was held at iy 2 o'clock this evening, Wm . 
G. Harris, the .President, presiding. 

PAPERS FROM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

The quarterly reports of the City Clerk and of 
Overseers of the Poor were ordered to be placed 
on file. 

The Auditor's Exhibit, Feb. 4, 1869, City Doc. No. 
20, was ordered to be placed ©n file. 

The several petitions for the purchase of the East 
Boston Ferry property, for opening the Public Li- 
brary on Sunday, of Maria O'Malley for compensa- 
tion for injuries, and ot C. R. Classen and others 
for an alarm bell on the elevator in Chandler 
street, were referred in concurrence. 

The request of the Committee on Bridges for an 
additional appropriation of §1200, City Doc. 21, 
1869; 

.Request of the Committee on Paving for an ad- 
ditional appropriation of §25,000, City Doc. 22, 
1869; and 

Kequest of the Committee on Public Buildings 
for an additional appropriation of $10,0110 for 
grammar school buildings, City Doc. 18, 1869, were 
severally referred to the Committee on Finance, 
in concurrence. 

Report, inexpedient, on the petition of David 
Block for a renewal of his lease of the "Bridge 
Estate" on Court street was accepted in concur- 
rence. 

DIRECTOR FOR PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS. 

The certificate of the election of Director for 
Public Institutions, coming down, for action there- 
on, 

Mr. Gray of Ward Twelve moved to lay the sub- 
ject of the election on tbe table. Lost. 

Messrs. Flynn ot Ward Seven, Hopkins oi Ward 
Ten and Pickering of Ward Fourteen were ap- 
pointed a committee to receive, sort and count the 
votes. The committee reported as follows: 

Whole number of votes 56 

Necessary to a choice 29 

George" P. French 15 

T. Warren Would 3 

Wm. Seaver 31 

Henry Warren 3 

George P. Darrow 1 

One ballot for Superintendent of Health, George 
W. Forristall. 

Mr. Seaver was declared to be elected, in con- 
currence. 

COCHITUATE WATER BOARD. 

Messrs. Butler of Ward Ten, Snow of Ward 
leven and Pearson of Ward Thirteen, were ap- 
pointed a committee to receive, sort and count the 
votes for two members of the Water Board. The 
committee reported as follows : 

Whole number of votes 54 

Necessary to a choice 28 

Common Council— Lyman A. Belknap.. .23 

Alex. Wadsworfch 30 

At large— Charles R. Train 27 

Charles H. Allen 27 

The election of Mr. Wadsworth on the part of 
this branch was adhered to, in non-concurrence, 
and there was no choice for a member at large. 
The second ballot resulted as follows : 

Whole number of votes 58 

Necessary to a choice 30 

Charles R. Train 26 

Charles H. Allen 32 

Mr. Allen was declared to be elected in concur- 
rence. 

HARBOR MASTER. 

The report of the committee to nominate a Har- 
bor Master was accepted, in concurrence. 
The election of Haibor Master was taken up. 



Mr. Wadsworth of Ward Four presented peti- 
tions from pilots, wharfingers, the Superintendent 
of the East Boston Ferry, and others, in favor of 
the reelection of John T. Gardner as Harbor Mas- 
ter, which were read and sent up. 

Mr. Dinsmore of Ward Two, as a member of the 
committee, gave some reasons in favor of tiie norn- 
iEation of Martin W. Tewksbury, who was recom- 
mended by underwriters and others for the office. 
He objected to Mr. Gardner, the present Harbor 
Master, on the ground, as hp alleged, of ill-treat- 
ment ot his wile and adopted daughter, and con- 
tended that his reelection under the charges 
against him would subject the City Government to 
a responsibility in countenancing immoralities. 

Mr. Denny of Ward Ten said he had heard ot 
the charges circulated against Capt. liardner, and 
presumed that there was hardly a single member 
of tbe Council who had not heard the merits of 
this family quarrel talked over. As far as he could 
understand, the foundation of this difficulty was 
spiritualism, and that Mr. Gardner had separated 
from his wife. He did not believe it to be worth 
while for the Council to be going into family diffi- 
culties. 

Mr. Denny did not know how many members of 
this board lived with their own wives, or how 
many ot them might have several, iso far as relat- 
ed to the treatment ot his adopted daughter, he 
had made an investigation and was satisfied that 
if it was not entirely erroneous, it had little foun- 
dation in (act, and he supposed the matter of 
treatment of his wife had been overstated. He 
did not care about going into his views of spiritu- 
alism, and did not think gentlemen of the Coun- 
cil were desirous of doing so. If they were not 
prepared to vote at this time, he hoped the elec- 
tion would be laid on the table. 

Mr. Dinsmore said he had a letter from a gentle- 
man in Marblehead, who had known Mr. Gardner 
tor many years, and. knowing that he had interest- 
ed himself in this matter, the letter was addressed 
to him. This gentleman was a relative, by mar- 
riage of Mr. Gardner, and his statements were 
from personal knowledge. 

A portion of tbe letter was read, when Mr. Gray 
of Ward 12, raised the objection that the letter 
was private, and there was an impropriety of hav- 
ing it read. 

The reading of the letter was suspended. 

Mr. Jenks of Wardi'hree, moved that the elec- 
tion be postponed one week. Lost, 13 to 14. 

Mr. Pickering of Ward Fourteen inquired if the 
underwriters who were in favor of Mr. Tewksbury 
made any objections to the qualifications of Mr. 
Gardner. 

Mr. Dinsmore replied that they did not. 

Mr. Pickering hoped the election would proceed, 
so long as Mrs. Gardner was not a candidate. 

Messrs. Flynn ot Ward Seven, Emerson or Ward 
Six and Squiies of Ward Eight were appointed a 
committee to receive and count the votes. The 
committee reported as fallows: 

Whole number of votes 59 

Necessary to a choice 30 

John T. Gardner 28 

Martin W. Tewksbury 9 

Michael J. Driscoll l'J 

VV m. C . Fowler 3 

A second ballot resulted as follows : 

Whole number of votes 59 

Necessary to a choice 30 

John T. Gardner 33 

Michael J. Driscoll 18 

Martin W. Tewksbuiy 4 

Wm. C. Fowler 3 

Mrs. Gardner 1 

Mr. Gardner was declared elected, in non-con- 
currence. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF HEALTH. 

Messrs. Wilkins of Ward Nine, Jacobs of Ward 
Five and Talbot of Ward Four were appointed to 
receive and count the votes, and reported as fol- 
lows: 

Whole number of votes 58 

Necessary to a choice 30 

Geo. W. Forristall 33 

Lucius W. Knight 21 

George Darrow 1 

E. Malone 1 

Abut r Knight 1 

Wm. F.Davis 1 

Mr. Forristall was declared to be elected in con- 
currence. 



FEBRUARY 11, 1869 



33 



The order appointing a joint committee to nom- 
inate candidates to iill vacancies in the Board of 
Overseers of the Poor was adopted in concurrence, 
and Messrs. Nelson of Ward Nine, Emerson of 
Ward Six and Iticli of Ward Fourteen were joined 
to the committee. 

The order authorizing the Committee on Lesislt.- 
tive Matters to appear for the Citv, before the Com- 
sioners on the Salem Turnpike and Chelsea Bridges 
was adopted, in concurrence. 

An ordinance to amend an ordinance in relation 
to streets was considered. 

air. Keith of Ward Fifteen said the provisions of 
the ordinance, generally, in relation to the re- 
moval ot snow and ice, met with his approval, but 
some of the provisious were very stringent and illy 
adapted to sparsely-settled portions of the city, 
such as Hoxbury, South Boston, and East Boston. 
There were instances where it would be difficult 
for owners ot property, having a very large lront- 
age on the street, to clear the walks within the 
time allowed by the ordinance. 

Mr. Osborn ot Ward Six, of the Committee on 
Ordinances, said the provisions referred to were 
no more stringent than in the present ordinance. 
The ordinance was drawn by the City Solicitor, to_ 
meet a difficulty under a decision in the courts, so 
that where there are several tenants in a building 
the owner will be held responsible for the removal 
of the snow and ice. In regard to the cases men- 
tioned by the gentleman lrom vVard Fifteen , those 
who have the charge of the execution of the law 
will use discretion, as they do now, in enforcing it. 

Mr. Ingalls of Ward Twelve was ot tne opinion tnat 
in one way the ordinance was more stringent. It 
relieved tenants, but imposed greater responsibili- 
ty upon landlords. There might be great difficulty 
to get snow and ice removed in season, where a 
man owned a hundred buildings, and failed to iind 
men enough to do the work at the time. 

Mr. Osborn replied that no owner of propety 
would allow such difficulty to occur, for he would 
make arrangements with some one of his tenants 
to see that the walks were cleared. 

Mr. Ingalls objected further to the stringency of 
the ordinance; that under present leases the ten- 
ants could not be required by the landlord to re- 
move the snow and ice, and until the expiration 
of these leases the landlord would be subject to 
great inconvenience and some expense in procur- 
ing men to do the work. 

Mr. Kich of Ward Fourteen said that nothing 
short of a measure of this character would meet 
the evil, since where there was a disposition on 
the part of one tenant to do the work, others 
would shirk it. 

Mr. Wadsworth of Ward Four remarked that it 
was a less evil for the owners of property to see 
that their walks were cleared 01 snow and ice than 
to compel the public to pass over such places all 
day. 

A motion to suspend the rules for a second 
reading of the ordinance was lost, when, on mo- 
tion oi Mr. Gray of Ward Twelve it was ordered 
to be printed. 

CITY SURVEYOR. 

Messrs. Braman of Ward Six, Noyes of Ward 
Five, and Going of Ward Three, a committee on 
votes for City Surveyor, reported as follows : 

Whole number of votes 50 

Necessary to a choice 2G 

Thomas W. Davis 49 

George P. Darrah 1 

CLERK OF COMMITTEES. 

Messrs. Wilkins of Ward Nine, Wells of Ward 
Three and Woods of Ward Twelve, a committee 
on votes for Clerk of Committees, reported as fol- 
lows: Whole number of votes 50, all ot which 
were for James M. Bugbee. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SEWERS. 

Messrs. Braman of Ward Six, Frost ot Ward 
Nine and Dinsmore of Ward Two, a Committee on 
Votes lor Superintendent of Sewers, reported : 

Whole number of votes 48 

Necessarv to a choice 25 

Win. H". Bradley 38 

Geo. P. Darrow 5 

Horace Jenkins, Henry W. Wilson and 

John C. Tucker one each 3 

Job T. Souther 2 



CITY MESSENGER. 

Messrs. Pickering of Ward Fourteen, Lucas of 
Ward Seven and Iveaney of Ward Two, a Com- 
mittee on Votes for City'aiessenger, reported the 
whole number of votes to be 56, 53 of which were 
for Oliver H. Spurr, and one each for three others. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 

Messrs. Jacobs of Ward Five, Davts of Ward 
Thirteen and Woolley of Ward One, a committee 
on votes for Superintendent ot Streets, repoited 
the whole number of votes to be 42, 37 of which 
were for Charles Harris and one each for five oth- 
er persons. 

CITY REGISTRAR. 

Messrs. Squires of Ward Eight, Wilkins of Ward 
Nine and Judson of Ward Fourteen, a committee 
on votes for City Registrar, reported the whole 
number of votes to be 15, 38 of which were for N. 
A. Apollonio,3 for George P. Darrow, 2 for Win, 
F. Davis and two others 1 each. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC LANDS. 

Messrs. Learnard of Ward Eleven, Squires of 
Ward Eight and Crowley of Ward Seven, Com- 
mittee on Votes for superintendent of Public 
Lands, reported the whole number of votes to oe 
39, 35 of which were lor Kobert W. Ha:l, and one 
each for four other persons. 

CITY SOLICITOR. 

Messrs. Poor of Ward Eleven, Hall of Ward One 
and Bond of Ward Eight, a commmittee on votes 
lor City Solicitor, reported the whole number of 
votes to be 45, 27 of which were for John P. Heaiy, 
G for A. A. Kanney, 4 for George P. Danow, 2 for 
M. E. Ingalls, and six persons one each. 

WATER REGISTRAR. 

Messrs. Hopkins of Ward Ten, Tucker ot Ward 
Six, and Conant ot Ward Fifteen, a committee on 
votes for Water Registrar, reported the whole 
number of votes to be 41, of which there were 35 
for Win. F. Davis and one each for six other per- 
sons. 

PORT PHYSICIAN. 

Messrs. Wadsworth of Ward Four, Osborn of 
Ward Six aid Pickering of Ward Fourteen, a com- 
mittee on votes for Port Physician, reported the 
whole number ot votes to be 38, of which there 
were 29 for Samuel H. Durgin, G for T.L. Jenks, 
and 1 each for three others. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF FEDERAL STREET BRIDGE. 

Messrs- Young of Ward One, Braman ot Ward 
Six and Vannevar of Ward Eight, a Commitee on 
Votes for Superintendent of Federal Street 
Bridge, reported the whole number of votes to be 
43, oi which there were for Jacob Norris 35, B. F. 
Butler 3, Geo. P. Darrow and Chas. J. Grabb 2 
each, and J. J. Gallavan 1. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF MERIDIAN STREET BRIDGE. 

Messrs. Gray of Ward Twelve, Malone of Ward 
Two and Pote of Ward One, a Committee on Votes 
for Superintendent of Meridian Street Bridge, re- 
ported the whole number of votes to be 37, of 
which there were for Abner lvnight 32, and five 
for other persons. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF CHELSEA STREET BRIDGE. 

Messrs. Snow of Ward Eleven, Denny ot Ward 
Teu and Lucas of Ward Seven, a Committee on 
Votes for Superintendent of Chelsea Street Bridge, 
reported the whole number of votes to be 39, of 
which there were for Edward T. Stowers 29, and 
10 for eight others. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF DOVER STREET BRIDGE. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward Seven stated that charges 
had been made against Mr. Brown, the old Super- 
intendent of this bridge, that he had been negli- 
gent of his duties, let the house intended for his 
use to others, and should the election be S aid on 
the table, he should move a committee of investi- 
gation into such charges. 

A motion to lay on the table was lost, and the 
Council proceeded to a ballot, on motion of Mr. 
Squires of Ward Eight. 

Messrs. Nelson of Ward Nine, Doherty of Ward 
Two, and Mullane of Ward Thirteen— a committee 
on votes for Superintendent of Dover Street 
Bridge— reported tlie whole number of votes to be 
42, of which there were for Angus Nelson 33, Jos. 
Silvera 6, Nathan Brown 2, and Kichard Cook 1. 



34 



COMMON COUNCIL 



SUPERINTENDENT OP MOUNT "WASHINGTON AVE- 
NUE BRIDGE. 

Messrs. Jenks of Ward Three, Kingsbury of 
Ward Fifteen and Jobnston of Ward Twelve, a 
committee on votes tor Superintendent of Mount 
Washington Avenue Bridge, reported the whole 
number of votes to be 39,ot which there were tor 
George H. Davis 34, and 5 lor four other persons. 

Older to take from the files the order concern- 
ing the extension of Hook and Ladder House Mo. 
4, over Eustis street Cemel ery, and refer it to 
the Committee on Public Buildings, was concur- 
red in. 

An ordinance to amend an ordinance concern- 
ing the assessment and collection of taxes, was 
referred to the Committee on Ordinances. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

The order authorizing the Committee on Fire 
Alarms to expend not over $500 in each case, for 
attaching striking apparatus to any of the bells of 
this city, was read a second time and passed. 

The order authorizing the erection of a brick 
building in the rear of, and connected with, the 
Hook and Ladder House on Eustis street, was laid 
on the table. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Mr. Wadsworth of Ward Four, from the Joint 
Special Committee on the Church Street District, 
to whom was referred the order establishing the 
salaries of the Commissioners on the Church 
Street District, from and after 1st October, 1808, 
at the rate of $2500 per annum, made a report 
recommending the passage of the order with an 
amendment to strike out "October, 1868," and in- 
sert in place thereof "January, 1869." 

Mr. Osborn of Ward Six made some inquiries 
relative to the proposed amendment, and to ob- 
tain further information, moved that the order be 
laid on the table. Carried. 

The Joint Standing Committee on Public In- 
struction, to whom was referred, as a part of the 
unfinished business of last year, the request of the 
School Committee that the City Council would 
purchase a lot of land on which to erect a Prima- 
ry schoolhouse in the Rice district, reported that 
in their opinion it would be expedient to purchase 
the lot on Appleton street, adjoining the new Kice 
Schoolhouse. 

The lot has an area of about 22,325 square feet 
and can be purchased on or before the 1st of March 
for $1 27^ per foot, amounting to $28,464 37. The 
Committee therefore recommend the passage of 
the following orders: 

Ordered, That the Committee on Public Build- 
ings be authorized to purchase the lot of land on 
Appleton street, adjoining the new Rice School- 
house, containing twenty-two thousand three 
hundred and twenty-five feet, more or less, for a 
sum not exceeding twenty-eight thousand four 
hundred and sixty-five dollars ; and procure plans 
and estimates for the erection thereon of a Prima- 
ry school building, said plans to be approved by 
the Committee on Public Instruction. 



Ordered, That the Treasurer be authorized to 
borrow, tinder the direction of the Committee on 
Finance, the sum of twenty-nine thousand dol- 
lars, to be applied to the purchase of land for a 
primary school building in the Kice district. 

The report was accepted, and the orders were 
read once. 

The Joint Standing Committee on Public In- 
struction, to whom was referred the request of the 
School Committee that the City Council should 
lUrnish a hall for the purposes of an exhibition by 
the deaf mutes from Hartford, Ct., and Northamp- 
ton, Mass., made a report recommending the pas- 
sage of the accompanying order, which was read 
and ordered to a second reading: 

Ordered, That the Committee on Public Instruc- 
tion be authorized to hire a suitable hall lor ex- 
hibitions, before the City Council, School Com- 
mittee and others, by the deaf mutes from 
Hartford, Ct., and Northampton, Mass., the ex- 
pense not exceeding seventy-five dollars, to be 
charged to the appropriation for incidental ex- 
penses. 

The same committee, to whom were referred the 
reports and papers in relation to the purchase of 
land adjoining the Lincoln Schoolhouse, having 
considered the subject, reported that in their opin- 
ion it would be inexpedient to purchase any addi- 
tional land. Accepted. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

Sidney F. Whitehouse and 63 others, Conants & 
Sanborn, S. W. Merriam & Co. and 55 others, Geo. 
Sherman, W. H. Cudworth and 55 otheis, Geo. W. 
Buckley and 31 others, Frederick Pease and 50 
others, H. H. Wetherell, Charles Siders and 34 
others, severally in aid of petitions lor the pur- 
chase of the East Boston Ferry property by the 
city. Referred to Committee on Ferries. 

Jarvis Williams, for extension of time for erec- 
tion and completion of buildings on land purchas- 
ed of the city. Referred to the Committee on Pub- 
lic Lands. 

Trustees of Roxbury Latin School. Referred to 
Committee on Public Institutions. 

ORDERS ADOPTED. 

On motion of Mr. Rich of Ward Fourteen, the 
Committee on Ordinances were directed to con- 
sider what measures may be necessary to secure 
the removal of snow and ice from sidewalks which 
abut on unoccupied lands, of which there are no 
owners known to be living in this Common- 
wealth. 

On motion of Mr. Snow of Ward Eleven, the 
Committee on Public Instruction were requested 
to ascertain what accommodations are furnished 
in the Grammar and Primary sohoolhouses, 
whether the rooms are overcrowded in some dis- 
tricts, while they are not full in others, and to 
make such suggestions as they may deem expedi- 
ent. 

Adjourned. 



35 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 
FEB. 15, 1869. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Board of Al- 
dermen was held this afternoon at lour o'clock, 
Mayor Shurtleff presiding. 

APPOINTMENT CONFIRMED. 

Arthur Dakin, police officer, without pay, at the 
Boylston Market. 

PETITIONS PEESENTED AND REFERRED. 

Franklin Haven and others, and Adams Expre«s 
Company and others, severally, for the extension 
of Washington street to Portland street. 

Josiah Quincy and 86 others for the extension of 
Devonshire street to Dock square and Brattle 
street, and for extension of Washington street to 
the same point, and from thence the two united be 
extended in a direct line to Haymarket square. 

ireeman, Snow & Co. and others, that Shaving 
street be laid out as a public highway. 

M. T. Durrell and others, for revision of High 
street betterments. 

Wm. Seaver and others, for extension of Vernon 
street over unocupied space between Cabot and 
Factory streets. 

Jewett & Pitcher, that Knox street be laid out 
as a public way, and the street be graded. 

Severally leferred to the Committee on Streets. 

Ceo. P. Barrow and others, against licensing H. 
Lefevre as aninnholder atNo. 11 Wairenton street. 
Ueferred to Committee on Licenses. 

M. Colby, tor abatement of assessment for a 
sewer in Eustis street. 

Joshua K. Bigelow and others, to be paid for 
land taken lor Stony Brook sewer. 

Henry Davenport and others, for a sewer in Haw- 
thorn street. Seveially referred to the Committee 
on Sewers. 

Jeremiah McCarthy, to be compensated for in- 
juries sustained by his son, from a tall in Thatcher 
street. Keferred to Committee on Claims. 

COMMUNICATIONS FROM THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

A request was received from the School Commit- 
tee for a primary schoolhouse in the Church 
street portion of the Brimmer district. Referred 
to the Committee on Public Instruction. 

A request was also received trom the School 
Committee for ierry tickets to be provided for 
High School pupils resident at East Boston. Re- 
ferred to joint standing Committee on Ferries. 

An order was also received from the School 
Committee, requesting a restoration of gas to the 
room of the usher in the Brimmer School build- 
ing, also for the introduction of gas into the lower 
rooms of the Mayhew Schoolhouse. Referred to 
the Committee on Public Buildings. 

Severally sent down for concurrence. 

NOTICES OF INTENTION TO BUILD. 

Chas. Edward Parker, Nos. 44, 46 and 48 School 
street; Hennesy& Lowe, Nos. 22, 24 and 26 Way 
street; Joseph Streck, 50 Cabot street; F. H. 
Moore, 2 Lincoln street; Williams & Co., corner 
ot Broadway and H streets; F. J. Doe, corner 
of Pleasant and Kirkland streets; Thomas 
Marshall, corner of Harrison avenue and 
Rollins street ; Owen Russell, rear of 103 Dedham 
street; L. M. Innes, Telegraph, near Gates street; 
Timothy Connelly, Village street, between Chap- 
man anil Dover streets; S. M. Allen, Washington 
street; W. A. & J. F, Beunett, Liverpool street, 
between Decatur and Meridian streets ; J. Lynch, 
Fifth street, between D and E streets. Severally 
referred to the Committee on Streets. 

HEARING ON ORDER OF NOTICE. 

The hearing on order of notice on the proposed 
rebuilding oi the sewer in Tremont street, between 
Common street and Warrenton street, was taken 
up by assignment. 

No person appearing in relation to the matter, 
the report was recommitted to the Committee on 
Sewers. 



UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

The following orders were read a second time 
and passed: 

Ordered, That the collection of the assessment 
levied upon John A. Vinton, for a sewer in Broad- 
way, be postponed until entry is made into the 
sewer from his estate. 

Ordered, That the order passed Dec. 7. 18C8, ap- 
portioning the betterments assessed upon Fred- 
erick Smith's estate in Bowker street into three 
parts, be rescinded, he having elected to pay the 
whole betterment in one sum. 

COMMON COUNCIL PAPERS. 

The several petitions for the purchase of the 
East Boston Ferry property by the City, of the 
Trustees of the Roxbury Latin School, and of Jar 
vis Williams, were referred, in concurrence. 

The report inexpedient to purchase land next to 
Lincoln Schoolhouse, was accepted, in concur- 
rence. 

The following ordinance and orders were acted 
upon in concurrence: 

Ordinance relating to increase of assessors, re- 
ferred to Committee on Ordinances. 

Order for Committee on Ordinances to report on 
removal of ice and snow lrom sidewalks abutting 
on unoccupied lands. 

Order for Committee on Public Instruction to 
report on Grammar and Primary School accommo- 
dations. 

COCHITUATE WATER BOARD. 

The election of one member of the Cochituate 
Water Board, coming up, the Board proceeded to 
a ballot, with the following result: 

Whole number of votes 11 

Necessary to a choice 6 

Common Council— Alexander Wadsworth 6 
Lyman A. Belknap 5 

Mr. Wadsworth was declared to be elected, in 
concurrence, the Board having receded from its 
former vote in electing Mr. Belknap. 

ELECTION OF HARBOR MASTER. 

The election of Harbor Master was taken up, and 
a ballot resulted as follows : 

Whole number of votes 12 

Necessary to a choice 7 

John T. Gardner 7 

Michael J. Driscoll, 5 

Mr. Gardner was declared to be reelected, in 
concurrence, the Board having receded from its 
former vote in the choice of Mr. Driscoll. 

ELECTION OF SUPERINTENDENT OF DOVER STREET 
BRIDGE. 

The election of Superintendent of Dover Street 
Bridge was taken up, and a ballot resulted as fol- 
lows: 

Whole number of votes 11 

IN ecessary to a choice 6 

Nathan Brown 7 

Angus Nelson 3 

Richard Cook 1 

Mr. Brown was declared to be elected, in non- 
concurrence. 

FREIGHT RAILROAD LOCATION. 

A notice was received from the Albany Street 
Railroad Company, accepting the location granted 
by the Board, in an order adopted February 1, City 
Document No. 16. Ordered to be placed on file. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Alderman White, from the Committee on Li- 
censes, reported in favor of licenses to specified 
persons, as victuallers, and the transfer of a wagon 
license. Severally accepted. 

Alderman White, from the same committee, re- 
ported in favor of licenses to Edward Riddle, for 
a velocipede rink at 126 Union street; of John C. 
Murphy, for a velocipede rink at 1020 Washington 
street; Lyman G. Mllier, lor a velocipede rink at 
the corner of C street and Broadway; W. H. P. 
Browned, to exhibit velocipedes at Lyceum Hall ; 
Daniel V. Kern, to exhibit velocipedes at 240 
Washington street, and at 142K Tremont street; 
Warren Street Chapel Association, for a Musical 
Festival at Faneuil Hall, Fe*>. 22; Miss Greenfield, 
for a concert at Tremont Temple, Feb. 23. Sever- 
ally accepted. 

Alderman White also reported in favor of licen- 
ses to six newsboys and one bootblack. Accepted. 



FEBRUARY 1 



5 



18 6 9 



36 



Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on 
Streets, reported no action necessary on sundry 
notices of intentijii to build. Accepted. 

Alderman White, from the Committee on Health, 
reported an order for the abatement of nuisances 
on the premises of certain parties in Willard 
street. Passed. 

Alderman Bradlee, from the Committee on Cem- 
eteries, made a report, with a request for an addi- 
tional appropriation of $1000, to meet the ordinary 
expenses of tbat department during the remainder 
of the financial year. 

The deficit is caused by expenditures for the fol- 
lowing purposes, not contemplated at die begin- 
ning of the year; 

Paving sidewalk of Kustis street Cemetery, 

and building tence $339 00 

Settees lor Copp's Hul Burial Ground 96 00 

Increase ot amount paid for collection of 

births 350 00 

Increase of Kegistrar's salary 300 00 



Total $1085 O'J 

The expenses for the remainder of the year are 
estimated as tollows: For collecting birtbs and 
indexing the same, $1842 75; sundry other ex- 
penses, $1481 10; making a total of $3323 85— to 
meet which there was an unexpended balance of 
$2323 85. Referred to the Committee on Finance. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on Streets, 
reported that an additional appropriation of Sev- 
enty-two Thousand Dollars will be required for the 
settlement of damages, and for completing the 
grading, paving and sidewalks on Oliver street. 

Two loans amounting to $250,000 have been made 
for this purpose as follows: 

1st loan made Sept. 29, 1866 $100,000 00 

2dloanmi.de Sept. 30, 1867 150,000 00 



Total amount of loans $250,000 00 

Revenue derived Irom sale of old build- 
ings, sale of earth, etc 39,198 38 



Making a total of. $289,198 38 

There has been expended on account 

of this street: 

For land and building dam- 
ages $159,562 21 

For grading, paving, sewers, 

etc 125,867 36 



Making a total ot $285,429 57 

Leaving a balance on hand of. $3,768 81 

The unsettled claims for damages on this 

street are estimated at $50,000 00 

Estimated cost of completing grading, 

paving and sidewalks 25,000 00 

Total $75,000 00 

Deduct balance on hand 3,768 81 

Leaving a balance required of $71,231 19 

This improvement is being made by the City, by 
authority ot a special act of the Legislature of 1865; 
and the whole net expense (except paving, build- 
ing sidewalks and a sewer) is to be assessed upon 
the abutting estates on said street. 

'fhe Committee, therelore, unanimously recom- 
mend the passage of the accompanying order, 
which was read twice and passed: 

Ordered, That the Treasurer be, and he hereby 
is, authorized to borrow, under the direction of the 
Committee on Finance, the sum of seventy-two 
thousand dollars, and that the same be added to 
the appropriation heretofore authorized, called the 
Oliver Street Temporary Loan. 

ELECTION OF ASSESSORS. 

Alderman Van Nostrand, irom the Committee 
to nominate candidates for Principal Assessors, 
made a report, nominating a ticket, as follows: 

Thomas HiliS, Horace Smith, Benjamin (lush- 
ing, George A. Simmons, and Daniel H. Whitney. 

The election of Assessors was taken up. 

Alderman James inquired the reason why the 
name of Thomas J. Bancroft had heen leit otf the 
list ot the Committee, who had proved acceptable 
as an Assessor. 

Alderman Van Nostrand of the Committee re- 
plied that he knew of no good reason why Mr. 
Bancroft's name had been left oft the list. 



An election of Assessors resulted as follows : 

Whole number of votes 12 

Necessary for a choice 7 

Thomas Hills 12 

Benjamin Cushing 10 

Horace Smith 8 

George A.Simmons 11 

T bomas J . Bancrott 10 

Daniel H. Whitney 6 

George E. Richardson 3 

Messrs. Hills, Cushing, Smith, Simmons and 
Bancroft were declared to be elected on the part 
of this Board. 

The Committee on Finance, to whom was refer- 
red the reports of the Committees on Paving, Pub- 
lic Buildings and Bridges, seveially asking for 
additional appropriations, made a report recom- 
mending the passage ot the following order: 

Ordered, That the Auditor of Accounts be au- 
thorized to make the following transfer of appro- 
priations : 

From Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument, Boston 
Common, $10,000; and frcm Police, $15,000, to that 
of Paving, &c. 

From Primary School Instructors to that for 
Grammar Schools, Public Buildings, $10,000. 

From the Reserved Fund to Bridges, $12,000. 

Read twice and passed. 

Alderman Pratt, from the Committee on Lamps, 
reported leave to withdraw on petition of John 
Towne & Son for a lamp to be placed and lighted 
in North Grove street. Accepted. 

Alderman White, from the Committee on Health, 
made a report, accompanied by the following order: 

Ordered, That the City Treasurer be and he is 
hereDy authorized to abate such portions of assess- 
ment as follows upon the within named parties 
from the original amount assessed by Health De- 
partment: Fergus Brennan, $24 80; James Cain, 
$55 62; Michael Shine, $36 59; Michael Cunning- 
ham, $30 05: Patrick Turner, §27 6fl; total, $174 75. 

Read twice and passed. 

Alderman James, from the Committee on Pav- 
ing;, reported the following order, which was 
passed. 

Ordered, That the City Surveyor be directed to 
furnish the grade of Newman street to N. F. Berry 
and John Mullay, they being about to build on said 
street. 

On motion of Alderman James, 

Ordered, That the Committee on Paving be and 
thev are hereby directed to report to the Board 
the changes which they may consider expedient to 
be made in the names of the streets, courts or 
places in the city, where two or more of said 
streets, courts or places are called by the same 
name. 

ORDERS PASSED. 

On motion of Alderman White, 

Ordered, That the Committee on Licenses be 
requested to prepare for the consideration of the 
Board of Aldermen a schedule of fares in hacks 
and hackney carriages within the city of Boston. 

Aldermau Seaver offered the following : 

Whereas, in the opinion ot this Board, the build- 
ing at the corner of Canal and Causeway streets, 
commonly called the Eastern Exchange, is so di- 
lapidated and dangerous to the public as to be a 
nuisannce, it is therefore 

Ordered, That the Chief of Police cause so much 
of said building to be taken down, at the expense 
of the owner thereof, as may be necessary to pre- 
serve the public from any danger therefrom. 
Passed. 

CELEBRATION OF WASHINGTON'S BIRTH-DAY. 

On motion of Alderman Fairbanks, 

Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor cause the 
bells of this city to be rung, and a national salute 
to be fired on Boston Common, at East Boston, 
South Boston and the Highlands, at noon, on Mon- 
day next, 22d inst., and that the several offices and 
buildings connected with the City Government be 
closed on that day, in commemoration of the birth- 
day of George Washington. 

On motion of Alderman Pratt, 

Ordered, That the Superintendent, under the 
direction of the Committee on Lamps, be and he 
is hereby authorized to purchase two hundred and 
fifty gas lanterns, at a cost not exceeding $1975, 
the same to be charged to the appropriation for 
Lamps. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent, under the 



37 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



direction of tbe Committee on Lamps, be and be 
is bereby authorized to purchase one hundred 
iron posts, at a cost not exceeding $1500, the same 
to be charged to the appropriation for lamps. 

Ordered, That tbe Superintendent, under tbe di- 
rection of tbe Committee on Lamps, be and be is 
hereby authorized to purchase two hundred and 
filty fluid lanterns, at a cost not exceeding $725, 
the same to be charged to tbe appropriation for 
lamps. 

Oh motion of Alderman Pratt, 

Ordered, That on tbe removal of the office of the 
City Physician to the room assigned in the new 
Charity Building, the room in the City Hall now- 
occupied by the City Physician be and the same is 
hereby assigned for the use of the Lamp Depart- 
ment. 

On motion of Alderman Talbot, it was ordered 
that a notice to quit be served on Wm. L. Burt, 
the custodian of the Post-Office site, and to tenants 
on property to be taken for tbe widening of Milk 
street, under order of April 11, 1868, namely, F. K. 
Doggett, Dexter Chase and Wm. H. Hopkins to 
vacate said premises by tbe 1st of April next. 

Aldermen James, White and Baldwin were ap- 
pointed a Committee to nominate candidates ior 
f?nce viewers, field drivers, pound keepers, and 
cullers of hoops and staves. 

ELECTION OF CITY PHYSICIAN. 

The election of City Physician was taken from 
tbe table, and a ballot took place with the follow- 
ing result : 

Whole number of votes 12 

Necessary to a choice 7 

Wm. Read 7 

Wm. H. Page 3 

Joseph S. Jones 2 

Dr. Bead was declared to be elected, in concur- 
rence. 

SALARY BILL. 

Tbe Salary bill was taken up, by special assign- 
ment, and considered. 



The several orders were read by their titles. 

Alderman Talbot moved to increase the salary ,of 
the Superintendent of Sewers to $3000. 

In support of tbe motion, he said that the salary 
should be the same as that of the Superintendent 
of Streets, as much ability if not as much labor 
being required, and the Superintendent being an 
efficient officer. 

Alderman Pratt suggested that for nearly six 
months in the year the worK of this department 
was not actively engaged in. 

The amendment was adopted. 

Tbe last order of tbe Salary bill having been 
reached, 

Alderman Talbot said be had designed to pro- 
pose an amendment to the pay of Assessors. 
The dooming department of the Board was 
a cause of delay in the work of the As- 
sessors, and he proposed to establish a 
fixed salary in the labor of dooming, and a per 
diem for the labor in th6 streets. He did not sup- 
pose action would be taken on this subject today, 
and had notprepared such an amendment as he 
wished to offer. 

On motion of Alderman Talbot, the Salary Bill 
was again laid on the table. 

Alderman Bradlee offered an ordinance in 
addition to an ordinance relating to the 
Overseers of the Poor, which was referred 
to the Committee on Ordinances, and sent 
down for concurrence. The ordinance pro- 
vides that the Overseers shall have charge of the 
Charity Building and Temporary Home on 
Chardon street, and have power to make and en- 
force all such proper rules and regulations as they 
shall deem expedient in relation thereto ; also to 
determine what societies shall be permitted to oc- 
cupy the building, the terms and length of time, 
proportion of current expenses of managing, heat- 
ing and lighting tbe same, such occupants to be 
removed at the pleasure of the owners. 

Adjourned to Tuesday, the 23d inst., at 4 o'clock 
P. M. 



38 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceeding's of the Common Council, 

FEB. 18, 1869. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Common 
Council was held at 1% o'clock this evening, Wm. 
G. Harris, the .President, presiding. 

PAPERS FBOM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

The petition of Jeremiah McCarthy, to be com- 
pensated for injuries sustained by bis son by a tall 
in Thatcher street, was referred in concurrence. 

The several requests of tbe School Committee 
for a Primary Schoolhouse to be used in tbe Brim- 
mer District; ior gas to be used in tbe room of the 
Usher in the Brimmer School, and in tbe lower 
rooms of the Mayhew Schoolhouse; and for ferry 
tickets for High School pupils resident at East 
Boston, were referred in concurrence. 

The request of the Committee on Cemeteries for 
an additional appropriation of oDe thousand dol- 
lars for their department during the remainder of 
the financial year (printed City Document, No. 
25, 1869,) was referred to Committee on Finance, 
in concurrence. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF DOVER STREET BRIDGE. 

The certificate of election of Nathan Brown by 
the Board of Aldermen was received. 

Mr. Vannevar of Ward Eight presented a peti- 
tion from Wm. H.Howard arid others, in favor of 
the retention of Nathan Brown as Supeiintendent 
of Dover Street Bridge. Ordered to be placed on 
file. 

Messrs. Batchelder of Ward Four, Jenks of Ward 
Three and Kingsbury of Ward Fifteen were ap- 
pointed a committee to receive, sort md count the 
votes. The committee reported as follows: 

Whole number of votes 47 

Necessary to a choice ...24 

Nathan Brown : . ....-.:... ;'■ 5 

Angus Nelson .37 

Joseph Silvera 2 

G.T. W. Braman 1 

Richard Cook ".-'. 1 

Martin Kussell 1 

Mr Nelson was declared to be elected again on 
the part of the Common Council in non-concur- 
rence.^ 

The following orders wore passed in concur- 
rence : 

Order directing salutes to be fired, and the build- 
ing and offices connected with the City Govern- 
ment, to be closed on the 22d inst., in commemora- 
tion of the birthday of George Washington. 

Order assigning a room in the City Hall for the 
use of the Lamp Department. 

The ordinance in addition to an ordinance relat- 
ing to the Overseers of the Poor was referred to 
tbe Committee on Ordinances in concurrence. 

The following orders were each read once : 

Order to transfer from "Soldiers' and Sailors' 
Monument," $10,000; and from "Police" $15,000, 
to the Appropriation for Paving, etc.; from "Pri- 
mary School Instructors," $10,000, to the Appro- 
priation for Grammar Schools and from the "Re- 
served Fund" §1200, to the Appropriation ior 
Bridges. 

Order authorizing tbe Treasurer to borrow $72,- 
000, to be added to the appropriation called the 
Oliver Street Temporary Loan. (Punted City Doc- 
ument No. 23, 18C9.) 

ELECTION OF ASSESSORS. 

The report of the Committee nominating Asses- V 
sors was accepted in concurrence, and a motion' 
was made to proceed to an election. 

Mr. Judson of Ward Fourteen said he desired to 
say a word in favor of a gentleman presented from 
the Highland District— a gentleman who had 
served efficiently ior five years as a member of the 
Board of Assessors in Roxbury. In behalf of that 
candidate he presented a petition, which he wished 
to have read and placed oh file. The petition was 
presented, signed by A. D.Williams and 174 other.-, 
hi behalf of to'H . Mcintosh . 



Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteen objected to the read- 
ing of the petition at length, as it had been placed 
in print in the hands of each member of the Coun- 
cil, and the Council voted not to have it read. 

Mr. Judson, in answer to an inquiry whether any 
objection could be made to Mr. Simmons, statea 
that he knew of none. 

Mr. Batchelder of Ward Four wished to know 
the reason why the committee left the name of Mr. 
Bancroft from the list of candidates nominated by 
them. Mr. Bancroft had proved to be an efficient 
offioer, and some reason should he given for the 
omission. 

Mr. Wilkins of Ward Nine spoke in favor of the 
claims of Mr. Bancroft, with whom he had served 
as an Assessor last year, and whom he knew to be 
an efficient accountant and an efficient asses.-or. 
On an inquiry, he wis informed by a member of 
the committee that there was no particular reason 
for not renominating him, but that it was one of 
those things which sometimes occur. 

Mr. Snow of Ward Eleven made a similar in- 
quiry of the committee relative to the omission of 
Mr. Bancroft's name. 

Mr. Hopkins of Ward Ten said it would be seen 
that the report of the committee was nrt unani- 
mous in substituting Mr. Whitney for Mr. Ban- 
croft, and there was no satisfactory reason for the 
change. 

The Council proceeded to an election. 

Messrs. Emerson of Ward Six, Squires of Ward 
Eight, and Hopkins of Ward Ten, were appointed 
a Committee to receive, sort and count the votes. 
The committee reported as lollows: 

Wbole number of votes 50 

Ntcessary to a choice 26 

Thomas Hills 35 

Horace Smith 37 

Benjamin Cushing 41 

Thomas J. Bancroft..;... 43 

George A. Simmons 39 

George E. Richardson 12 

Wm. H. Mcintosh.... 11 

Daniel H.Whitney 8 

Messrs. Hills, Smith, Cushing, Bancroft and 
Simmons were declared to be elected in concur- 
rence. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

The following orders were severally read a sec- 
ond time and passed; 

Order authorizing a hall to be hired lor exhibi- 
tions before the City Council, School Committee, 
and others, by deaf mutes from Hartford, Conn., 
and Northampton, Mass. 

Orders authorizing land to be purchased on Ap- 
pleton stieet, adpjining tbe Rice Schoolhouse, for 
a Primary School building, and tor a loan of $29,- 
000 to be applied therefor. 

An ordinance to amend an ordinance in relation 
to Streets, (printed City Document. No. 24, 18G9,) 
was taken up. 

Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteen said that in answer 
to an objection made by him at the last meeting, 
it was urged that leniency would be exerciseo in 
cases where there would be hardships arising 
under this ordinance. An ordinance, however, 
should be so tramed as to be tree from the objec- 
tion suggested by him on this ground. It would 
be well, he thought, so to provide toat in portions 
ot the city wnore it was sparsely settled, a greater 
length of time should be given for clearing the 
walks roin snow. It would Le no new thing to 
discriminate between the city proper and the out- 
lying oistricts of the metropolis. This had been 
done in Philadelphia, which, with its large area 
and differences in population, had to be treated 
differently, in proportion to the density of its pop- 
ulation. 

Ihere are portions of the Highlands w'~ere the 
injustice of an ordinance not framed to meet the 
tact of a sparse population, would operate as un- 
justly as in Philadelphia. He hoped, therefore, 
that the ordinance would be laid on the table to 
allow time for its proper consideration, and to pre- 
pare amendments which will remove the objection 
which he had suggested. He had not had time tor 
the purpose, as yet, and meantime, as the present 
ordinance is in force, no harm will result from de- 
lay. 

Mi. Jenks of Ward Three rhoved to insert the 
words "or persons" after "person" in the filth 
line of the 51st section, and in the same section, 
sixth line, insert "part of" alter "any." 

Mr. Osbovn ot Ward Six objected to the amend- 



FEBKUABY 18, 1 8 6 9 V . 



39 



ments, as calculated to render the ordinance in- 
operative. 

Mr. Jei;ks said his amendments were designed to 
meet cases where a tenement is partly occupied, 
so that the owner would not he responsible lor the 
removal or the snow under such circumstances. 

Kemarks were made m opposition by Messrs. 
Osborn of Ward Six and lug-alls of Ward Twelve, 
and the former suggested a rurther amendment, 
which would be necessary it those proposed by 
Mr. Jenks were adopted. 

The suggestion was accepted, as a modification 
of the amendments, and the amendments were re- 
jected. 

Mr. Jenks said his opposition arose from an in- 
justice which might resalt from the ordinance, as, 
lor instance, if a man owned twenty stores, and one 
of them alone was unoccupied, the landlord would 
be responsible tor cleaning the walks ot the nine- 
teen which were occupied. 

Mr. lngal.s ot Ward Twelve said that therein 
consisted the beauty of the ordinance, tor if a man 
was the owner ot twenty huildings, nineteen of 
which were occupied, he would find it necessary to 
make arrangements with his tenants to keep the 
walks clear. 

Mr. Jenks wished to know what remedy a land- 
lord would have with a tenant who had a lease for 
twenty years. 

Mr. Uich of Ward Fourteen opposed any delay 
in the passage of the amendment to the ordinance, 
and said that most of the objections which had 
had been made to it respecting the want of proper 
time to clear the snow would apply to the ordi- 
nance now on the statute hooks. The necessity 
was urgent for the passage of the amended ordi- 
nance. He did not know 01 any remedy in the case 
of the lease suggested. 

»lr. Ingalls said that if the tenant had such a 
lease, he would be liable for the removal of the 
snow. 

On motion of Mr. Keith, the further considera- 
tion of the ordinance was postponed one week. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Mr. Osborn of Ward Six, from the Joint Stand- 
ing Committee on Ordinances, to whom was re- 
ferred the ordinance to amend the ordinance con- 
cerning the assessment and collection of taxes, 
(relieving the permanent assessors from any speci- 
fied duty on the street, and increasing the number 
of the first assistant assessors), made a report that 
the ordinance ought. to pass. 

The ordinance was considered. 

Mr. Osborn explained the obiect of the proposed 
change. Under the present ordinance, giving sev- 
eral wards two Second Assistant Assessors, there 
are three more 61 the Second Assistant Assessors 
than there are of the First, and in having a man of 
one Board go over the ward with one ot tho other, 
three of the principal Assessors are required to 
do street duty. It was found that there was a dif- 
ference of valuation in property on opposite sides 
of the street, which it was hoped would be reme 
died by the proposed change in relieving the prin- 
cipal Assessors from some of their present duties. 
The striking out of the eleventh section, allowed 
the designation of some one to remain in the of- 
fice. 

The ordinance was read once and the question 
being on giving it a second reading at the present 
time", 

Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteen raised a question of 
order whether under the rules it could be read a 
second time at this session ot the Council. 

The chair decided that this did not come under 
the rule requiring the matter to lie over, 

Mr. Keith, after readiug section 47 of the rules, 
expressed his acquiescence in the decision of the 
chair. 

The ordinance was read a second time by its title 
and passed. 

Mr. Squires of Ward Eight, from the Joint 
Standing Commtttee on Public Lands, to whom 
was relerred the petition of Jarvis Williams, for 
extension of time for building upon a lot of land 
on Harrison avenue, made a report as follows: 

That the lano in question was purchased of the 
city by Edward Gallagher, August 30, 1867, one of 
the conditions of sale being that a building not 
less than three stories in height, exclusive of the 
basement and attic, the exterior wall of which- 
shall be of brick, stone or iron, was to be erected 
within two years from August 30, 1867. The agree- - 
meat was transferred. to the petitioner, he under- ,/ 



standing lully all of the Conditions set forth in 
the agreements. There being ample time for the 
conditions to be complied with, the Committee 
recommend that the petitioner have leave to 
wULdraw. 

Mr. Snow of Ward Eleven wished to know if Mr. 
Williams had an opportunity to appear before the 
committee and make known the reasons for his 
request. The order was offered by him, and Mr. 
Williams desired such an opportunity to appear 
before the committee. 

Mr. Squires said he was not present at the ses- 
sion of the committee. 

Mr. Snow said he feared that he might have 
omitted a part of bis duty, and lest injustice 
snould be done to Mr. Williams he would move 
that the report be recommitted, and that the Com- 
mittee be instructed to give Mr. Williams a hear- 
ing- 

The motion was carried. 

Mr. Denny of Ward fen submitted the following 
order: 

Ordered, That the Committee oh the Harbor be 
authorized to expend a sum not exceeding three 
thousand dollars, in repairing the city steam 
dredging machine and scows and boats connected 
therewith, said sum to be charged to the appropri- 
ation for the dredging machine. 

Mr. Keith inquired if this order had been before 
a Committee of the Council. 

Mr. Denny replied that it came from the Com- 
mittee on the Harbor. 

Mr. Hall of Ward Ohe inquired if this dredging 
machine had not been let out by contract, the con- 
tractors to keep it in repair. 

Mi. Denny replied that it had been so let out, 
asd that the Contractor Was required to return it 
in a suitable condition. Whether it was returned 
in as good condition as When let-out he could not 
say. If not, as the party gave good securities, he 
will be held liable. It was necessary, however, 
that there should be made some repairs, to meet 
the wear and tear of the machinery and boats. 

Mr. Wells of Ward Three inquired if the city did 
not put in new boilers last year ar the expense ot 
the city. 

Mr. Denny did not know about this matter, but 
still if repairs were necessary they must be made. 

Mr. Wells did not see why they should come to 
the city for repairs if the contractors were to make 
them. 

Mr. Jenks of Ward Three inquired the amount 
paid lor the use of the dredging machine and 
boats. 

Mr. Denny believed it was $600 a month. It was 
not proposed, however, to let it at that price again. 
It was his opinion that the city could get more 
than that price, and he was for getting the last dol- 
lar he could. 

Mr. Jenks wished to know how many months it 
was kept employed during the year. 

Mr. Denny did not believe it was over fourteen, 
but thought it was twelve. m$. , 

Mr. Jenks hoped the city might do better, and 
get not less than eighteen. 

The order was lost, by a vote of 20 to 23. 

On motion of Mr. Osborn of Ward Six the order 
increasing the salaries of the Commissioners on 
the Church Street District was taken up. 

Mr. Hall ot Ward One said he should like to in- 
quire of the committee the necessity of the in- 
crease of these salaries. 

Mr. Wadsworth of Ward Four said it was not 
supposed when the work was commenced that it 
would proceed so rapidly as it had done. In the 
rapidity ot the work, it had progressed so fast 
that more was required ot the Commissioners 
than they had anticipated. He was not himself in 
favor of so large an increase, but it was believed the 
increase of pay would impart more vim to the Com- 
missioners in forwarding the work. It was proba- 
ble that the work would be finished before the 
close of the present year, so that it would not. 
make a great addition to the aggregate salaries. . 

Mr. Pickering ot Ward Fourteen was afraid that 
if the Commissioners should receive more pay af- 
ter they hid showed so much vim as to forward 
the work beyond public expectations, the increased 
pay may have a contrary effect in diminishing 
their energy. 

Mr.Wadsworth, in reply, said it was not the com- 
missioners but the contractors who had pushed 
the work forward so rapidly. 

Mr. Frost of Ward Nine said he had been in the ■'■ 



40 



COMMON COUNCIL. 



way of seeing rnuch of this work and the time re- 
quired of trie Commissioners. Thework had been 
pushed forward fast enough, and it had been well 
done. The order should he passed. 

Mr. Hall ol Ward One said it appeared that the 
work had been pushing the Commissioners, and 
wished to know what effect it would have to in- 
crease their pay. 

Mr. Wadsworth had no doubt that more than an 
equivalent would be realized by the increase of 
compensation. 

Mr. Hopkins of Ward Ten said it was supposed 
in the outset that such an arrangement could be 
made as would not require the services of each 
of the Commissioners more than two hours in 
each day. On the contrary, the whole three were 
required to be present all day, deciding upon mat- 
ters which may come up, and answering questions 
which often require consultation. 

It was supposed that the work would last three 
years, but this time would be much shortened. 
One of these Commissioners was now paying out 
more than he received to parties to fill his place. 

Ihe order was passed, by a vote ot thirty-three 
to teu. 

Mr. Wadsworth of Ward Four, from the Com- 
mittee on the Church Street District, offered the 
following: 

Ordered, That the Commissioners on the Church 
Street District, under the direction of the Joint 
Special Committee on said district, and with the 
approval 6f His Honor the Mayor, be and they are 
hereby authorized in the settlement and adjust- 
ment of damages for the taking of land in the 
Church Street District (so-called) with the 
former owners thereof, pursuant to an order ol the 
City Council approved by the Mayor on the 24th 
day of November, A. D. 18C8, to convey to them re- 
spectively any parcels of land, or parts thereof, 



owned by the city, within the limits of the said 
district, and upon such terms and conditions as 
they shall deem expedient, and the Mayor is au- 
thorized to execute deeds of all such parcels of 
land or parts thereof, accordingly. 

Mr. Wadsworth, in explanation of the order, 
said it had been lound that in consequence of 
widening several streets in the Church street ter- 
ritory, by setting back the houses, additions were 
made to many estates, and it was thought neces- 
sary to pass the order to meet such cases. 

Mr. Jenks wished to know if this was not a 
roundabout wav ot assessing betterments on those 
estates, after it had been determined that they 
could not be subject to the betterment law. 

Mr. Wadsworth replied that this was not a 
roundabout way of assessing betterments. Many 
estates had been improved by the widening ot 
streets, and this was not a roundabout way, but a 
direct one, of requiring those who were benefited 
by the widening of streets to pay for the amount 
for which they may be liable. 

The order was passed. 

Mr. Wadsworth offered the following: order : 

Ordered, That so much ot the land belonging to 
the city as was purchased for the use of the Po- 
lice Station now being erected in Ward Fifteen, 
on Washington street, as is not required for the 
use of the same, be assigned to the use of the 
Cochituate Water Board. 

In explanation of the order, the mover said that 
more land was purchased than was needed for the 
Station House, for the purpose of erecting thereon 
engines for the use of the Water Board. By de- 
voting this land to the Board, as was designed, it 
will save purchasing other land for the purpose. 

The order was passed. 

Adjourned. 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



41 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 
FEB. 23, 1869. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Board of Al- 
dermen was held this afternoon at iour o'clock, 
Mayor Shurtleff presiding. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

H. A Turner & Co. and others, that West street 
he widened, opposite Mason street. 

Joseph W. Ward and others, that Ninth street 
be extended from H to G streets. 

Calvin B. Faunce and others, tor the widening of 
Fynchon street. 

*W. & A. Bacon and others, that Winthrop place 
he widened, straightened and graded. 

A. Wentworth & Co. and 228 others, for the ex- 
tension of Washington street through to Hay- 
market square. 

•lohn B. Tuttle and others, that Columbus ave- 
nue be laid out as a public street, from West 
Chester Park to Dartmouth street. 

Carpenter, Woodward & Morton and others, 
owners and occupants of buildings on State 
street, against any change in the numbers on said 
street. 

Henry Pfaff and 27 others, for the extension of 
Parker place to Pynchon street, Ward Fifteen. 

J. B. Kimball and 105 others, for the extension 

of Devonshire and Washington streets. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Streets. 

Badger & Batchelder, for leave to use a steam 

boiler in their building, corner of Charles aud 

Cambridge streets. 

Jordan, Marsh & Co. and others against the pro- 
posed location of a steam boiler in Avon place. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Steam 
Engines. 

A. Folsom & Sons, and 73 others, tor lamps on . 
Longwood avenue, Ward Fifteen. Reierred to 
Committee on Lamps. 

Sisters of Charity, for pecuniary aid to the Car- 
ney Hospital. Referred to the Committee on 
Overseers of the Poor. 

F. J. Nash and others, in aid ot petition of Ren- 
ton Carter, for a candy stand in School street. 
Referred to Committee on Licenses. 

Andrew Barret and others, for abatement ot a 
nuisance arising from the brook making the divid- 
ing line between Boston and Dorcnester. Referred 
to Committee on Health. 

John ft. Buckley, to be heard respecting the al- 
leged causes lor his discharge from the Police. 
Referred to Committee on Police. 

Chief-of-Police, in relation to the dangerous 
building on Causeway street. Referred to Com- 
mittee on Police. 

Samuel D. Bates, for renewal of his lease of the 
Bridge estate. Referred to the Committee on 
Public Buildings. 

Mary Stratton, to be paid for personal injuries 
sustained by a fall in the street. Referred to the 
Committee on Claims. 

S. S. Gray and others, that Newman street be 
paved from Lowland to Dorchester street. 

George Young and Horatio Harris, that the area 
around Joy's Building be paved with wood. 

Sarah H. Brown, for abatement for assessment 
for sidewalk on Mount Pleasant avenue. 
Severally referred to Committee on Paving, 
Nathan S. Maine, that an assessment for a sewer 
in Putnam street may be refunded. Referred to 
Committee on Sewere. 

Daniel D. Kelley and 33 others, Geo. T. Adams, 
Heath, Cheney & Myrick and 40 others, for the 
purchase ot the East Boston Ferry Company's 
property by the city. Referred to the Committee 
on Ferries. 

NOTICES OF INTENTION TO BUILD. 

D. E. Poland, 16 and 18 Devonshire street; C. E. 
Parsons, 52 Howard street: Samuel Newell, C 
street, between first and Second streets j Thomas 
Keves, 153 Albany street; Brown & Leavitt, Brim- 



mer street; James Currier, corner of Thomas and 
Atlantic streets: Brown & Leavitt, Berkeley 
street, between Marlborough and Beacon streets ; 
James Shields, 48 Leverett street; Davis Damon, 
White street, between Monmouth and Marion 
streets; Thomas L. Jenks, corner of Spring street, 
Milton street and Melville place; John Chris- 
tie Fourth street, between N and O streets; 
Francis James, Fourth street, between G 
and H streets; John A. Leigh ton, 1088 Washing- 
ton street; M. Leavitt, Dudley street, comer of 
Lewis place; N. J. Bradlee, 20, 22 and 24 Devon- ' 
shire street; Wm. Maguire, 234 Harrison avenue; 
S. J. F. Thayer, 8 Avon place; H. M.Wilson, 20 
Boylston street; Jos. W. Tucker. Norfolk street, 
between Lambert avenue and Highland street; 
Alonzo II. Morris, Brookline street, between Shaw- 
mut avenue and Treinont street; James E. McCam- 
mon, corner of Fifth and M streets ; D. W. Beckler, 
corner of Second and E streets ; Richardson & 
Young, 418 Hanover street; P. McAleer, 15 and 17 
Province street and Chapman place; Wm. Cut- 
cliff, London street, between Porter and Marion 
streets; Wm. J. Irving, 8 Cambridge street.; Mau- 
rice Kidney, Union Park street, between Albany 
street and Harrison avenue; H. Penniman, Fourth 
street, between D and E streets. Severally re- 
ferred to tne Committee on Streets. 

THE BURRILL CLAIM AGAINST THE CITY. 

A memorial was received from Charles Burrill 
in relation to his claim against the city for obtain- 
ing 6529 names or men, allowed on the quota of 
this city, in 1864, in which he says, after stating the 
various circumstances relating to it: 

"But as yet he has received nothing from the 
city of Boston, or the said Mayor, [Lincoln] as com- 
pensation for his said services and expenditures; ' 
on the contrary, his claims for compensation have 
been disregarded, and he has felt obliged to, and ' 
has, under the advice of counsel, brought suits • 
againsi the city of Boston, to establish said claims. 
But owing to the great delays and expenses there- r 
of, and the technical defence set up, he has re- 
solved to discontinue the said suits and come be- 
fore you with this petition. 

He further says, that if in the judgment of good 
and competent mei he is not entitled to compen- 
sation Irom the city, for his exertion and expendi- 
tures, he will submit to such judgment and make 
no further claim. He therefore prays that the 
whole , matter may be careiully considered and 
fairly judged, after giving him a proper hearing, 
or that such claim may be referred to high-mind- 
ed, disinterested and competent men, to be de- 
cided without unnecessary delay." 

Alderman Bradlee hoped no action would be ta- 
ken on this memorial at the present time. The 
subject involved in it was so important that no 
step should be taken, nor should there be action 
which might commit the city to any course until it 
was ascertained whether the suits which Mr Bur- 
rill brought against the city, and were now pend- 
ing, had been withdrawn. It is not stated in the , 
petition that the suits had been withdrawn, but 
only that it is proposed to withdraw them. The 
views of the City Solicitor should he obtained, and 
he moved that the memoiial be laid on the table. 
Carried. 

On motion ot Alderman Bradlee it was 

Ordered, That the City Solicitor be requested to • 
inform this Board in regard to the present condi- 
tion of the suit brought by Charles Burrill against 
the City of Boston. 

APPOINTMENTS MADE AND CONFIRMED. 

The Mayor submitted the following appoint- 
ments, which were confirmed: 

Superintendent of Lamps— Geo. H. Allen. 

Superintendeat of Faneuil Hall Market — Charles 
B. Rice. 

Superintendent of Faneuil Hall — Henry Taylor.' 

Truant Officers — Chase Cole, Edward G. Rich- 
ardson, Geo. M. Felch, Phineas Bates, Abrahani 
M. Leavitt, Samuel Mcintosh, Edward F. Mecuen, 
Charles E.Turner. 

Under takers— Caleb I. Pratt, Franklin Smith, 
Richard Dillon, John Peak. Constant T. Benson, 
William Cooley, Lewis Jones, David Marden, John 
W. Pierce, N ahum P. Whitney, Davia Gugenhei- 
mer, Job T. Cole, Oren Faxon, Wm. II. Brown, 
Benjamin F. Smith, Hiram Stearns, Philip E. 
Field, John H. Peak, Daniel O'Sullivan, Wm. E. 
Brown, James Haynes, Daniel Ellard, Uobert S. 



42 



BOABD OF A E D E B M E N 



G. Marden, Hugh Taylor, Jeremiah Tinkham, 
Louis Adam,Wm. D. Rockwcod, Dennis Sullivan, 
Philip Kennedy, George V. Field, John C. Seaver, 
Joseph S. Waterman, Wra. Manning, John Heintz, 
John Haynes, Martin Lynch, James Farrell, Saml. 
J. Crockett, Hyram T. Weiner, James Cotter, Geo. 
Johnson, Geo. Stevens. 

Weighers of Hay — North Scales, Josiah Liver- 
more; South Scales, Maurice B. Rowe; South Bos- 
ton Scales, John M. Johnson; East Boston Scales, 
JohnW. Kimball ; Highlands, AndrewW. Newman. 

Measurer of Grain— George P. Kay. 

Measurers of Wood and Bark— Timothy Abbott, 
B. G. Prescott, William Keith, Josiah Livermore, 
William Seaver, Henry Basford, Francis Freeman, 
Edwin A. Keinick. 

Inspectors and Weighers of Bundle Hay— Israel 
M. Barnes, Samuel B. Livermore, Henry Emerson, 
William S. Holmes, Jasper H. Eaton, William K. 
Inman, F. G. Dudley, vValter C. Bryant. 

Inspector of Milk — Henry Faxon. 

Surveyor of Marble — Thomas J. Bayley. 

Inspector of Coal Oils— Robert F. Means. 

HEARINGS ON ORDERS OF NOTICE. 

The order of notice on the proposed new street, 
from Harrisdn avenue to Albany street, and on 
the proposed widening of Harrison avenue, near 
Dover street, werp taken up. No person appear- 
ing in relation thereto, the reports were recomit- 
ted. 

The order of notice on petition of Samuel West, 
for leave to maintain a steam engine and boiler at 
No. 1 Avon place, was taken up. 

Hales W. Suter appeared in opposition to grant- 
ing the petition, and the remonstrance of Jordan, 
Marsh & Co. and others was presented. 

Mr. Suter said he was not aware of the usual 
course in such matters, but was prepared to ob- 
ject to the petition alter hearing the reasons for 
granting it. The petitioner had erected a wooden 
L and a tall chimney to the building, and the re- 
monstrants believert it would prove dangerous to 
put an engine into it, which might cause a Are at 
any time. 

S. E. Sewall appeared in behalf of Hon. Richard 
Fletcher, who was in poor health, and would 
greatly be annoyed by a steam engine so near his 
premises. It was his belief aud that of other re- 
monstrants that such engine's should be confined 
to particular localities, and that this was not a 
suitable place lor the erection of a steam engine. 

A. W. Boardman appeared tor the petitioner, 
and stated that they were prepared for a hearing 
at any time, either before the Board or before a 
committee. It was supposed by him that a hear- 
ing would take place before a committee, as be- 
ing preferable to a hearing beloie the whole 
Board. 

On motion of Alderman Talbot, the report 
was recommitted, lor a hearing of the parties 
before the Committee on Steam Engines. 

CONVENTION TO FILL A VACANCY IN THE SCHOOL 
COMMITTEE. 

The Board concurred in the request of the School 
Committee, for a Convention on Tuesday, March 
9th, lor the purpose of tilling a vacancy in the Com- 
mittee, caused by the resignation of Wm. C. Wes- 
cott, a member of that Board from Ward Seven. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

The following order was read a second time and 
passed: 

Ordered, That the Treasurer be directed to re- 
fund to Isaac Samuels the sum of $20 95, being 
the amount paid by. Samuels for a defective "tax 
title on an estate in Springer place, in the' year 
1861, with interest thereon, at the rate of six per 
cent, per annum, said sum to be charged to the re- 
ceipts lor taxes. 

COMMON COUNCIL PAPERS. 

The following orders and references were 
adopted, in concurrence: 

Order for Committee on Public Instruction to 
hire a suitable hall for exhibition of deaf mutes. 
Estimated expense $75. 

Order for Church Street Commissioners to re-r 
convey certain estates to former owners in settle- 
ment of damages, &c. 

Order to fix salary of Church Street Commis- 
sioners at $2,500 per annum, from January 1, 1869. 

Report leave to withdraw on petition of Jarvis 



Williams, for extension of time in which to build 
on Harrison avenue. Recommitted with instruc- 
tions to hear the petitioner. 

The order to allow the Cochituate Water Board 
t > use a portion of the Police Station lot in Ward 
Fifcpen, which was at first passed in concurrence, 
was, on motion of Alderman Richards, recoi. sic' ered 
and -eferred to the Committee ou Public Build- 
ings. 

The ordinance to amend ordinance in relation 
to taxes, so as to elect nineteen first assistant as- 
sessors, was passed in concurrence. 

Oriers to purchase land on) J Appleton street, for 
a primary schoolhouse site (22,325 feet for $28,465) 
and tor a loan of $29,000 therefor, being under con" 
sideration, 

Alderman Richards said he did not propose to 
make opposition to the passage of this order, yet 
he could not let this opportunity pass without ex- 
pressing his dissent from the manner of forcing 
upon the Committee on Public Buildings the tak- 
ing of action on matters for which they cannot be 
responsible, in examining into the propriety or 
expediency of purchases. This might all be right, 
but there should be time granted for the Commit- 
tee to examine into matters before being called 
upon to act. The Committee on Public Buildings, 
being required to decide upon matters of this kind, 
should have the right to take time enough to de- 
cide what shall be best for the public interests and 
relieve themselves from blame through hasty ac- 
tion. The time fixed for the purchase in the order, 
he was aware, would not allow of a reference to 
that Committee. 

Alderman White said the reason why immediate 
action was called for was, that there were two 
other parties desirious of purchasing the lot which 
was owned by Mr. Matthews, and be had fixed 
upon the 1st March as the limit of time in which 
the city shall have the refusal of it. The matter 
was under consideration last year, and this lot was 
reported as the most favorable one for a primary 
schoolhouse, so that it could not be presumed to 
be hasty action. 

Alderman Pratt said the difficulty in this case 
grew out of the ill-defined powers of the Commit- 
tee on Public Instruction. That committee was 
the only one which came between the School Com- 
mittee and the City Council, and they truly rep- 
resent the City Council and the School Commit- 
tee. He could not see why the Chairman of the 
Committee on Public Buildings should object to 
the exercise of power by the Committee on Public 
Instruction in indicating such lots as might be 
best suitable to the wants of the schools. 

The Committee on Public Buildings have the 
privilege at all times to refer back when they find 
any action submitted to them which is objectiona- 
ble, and when it comes to the erection of build- 
ings, they may take the responsibility of such ac- 
tion as dev lives upon them, as the Committee on 
Public Instruction are perfectly willing to assume 
all the responsibility belonging to them. 

Alderman Richards said he was not apt to cavil 
when there was no occasion for it. When the gen- 
tleman says there is no occasion-to cavil, he might 
refer to a case in his own neighborhood, in Char- 
ter street, where a schoolhouse was crowded in 
improperly, and yet the Committee on Public 
Buddings had been blamed for what they were not 
responsible for. A similar case occurred in the 
building of the Phillips Schoolhouse, where the 
schoolhouse comes in close contact with the wall 
of a church. The people don't know about such 
matters and blame the Committee on Public 
Buildings. 

These reports often come in the form of a ne 
remptory order, and it is frequently the case that 
there is no time to consider them. In this respect 
the Committee on Public Instiuction had en- 
croached upon the duties of the Committee on 
Public Buildings. In this case the time fixed for 
the purchase was so short that there was no 
choice. He was willing to take the responsibility 
of his actions, but wished to have time to consider 
such matters. 

Alderman Pratt further defended the course of 
the Committee on Public Instruction, and made 
some remarks relative to the erection of the stair- 
ways in the Charter street Schoolhouse, over 
the building of which the Committee on Public In- 
struction exercised no control. If committees 
made mistakes they must take the responsibility 
for such mistakes. 

The order was adopted by a unanimous vote; 



FEBRUARY 2 3 



18 6 9 



48 



SUPERINTENDENT OF DOVER STBEET BRIDGE. 

The Board proceeded to an election of Superin- 
tendent of Dover Street Bridge. The result of the 
balloting was as follows : 

Whole number of votes 12 

Necessary to a choice 7 

Angus -Nelson 4 

Richard Cook. 4 

Martin Russell .. ...4 

The secondballot was as follows: 

Whole number of votes 12 

Necessary to a choice 7 

Martin Russell 7 

Richard Cook 3 

Angus Nelson ..'.'.2' 

Mr. Russell was declared to be elected, in non- 
poncurrence. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Alderman White, from the Committee on Licen- 
ses, uiaae reports granting licenses to innholders, 
and for wagon stands, which were accepted. 

Also, licenses to six boys to sell papers, three to 
sell lamp mats, and one to sell matches. Severally 
accepted. 

The same committee also reported favorably on 
petitions, as follows, all of which were accented: 

Wm. B, Shedd, ibr a velocipede rink at 296 Wash- 
ington street. 

Berry & Stone, for a velocipede rink at 286 Com- 
mercial street. 

D. L. Thatcher and others, for a velocipede rink: 
at No. 7 Green street. 

Charles F. Briggs and others, for a velocipede 
rink at Institute Hall, Highlands. 

Walter Brown and others, for a velocipede rink 
at 179 Court street. 

Frederick M. Harris, for a velocipede rink at 847 
Washington street. 

J. T. Atwood, for a velocipede rink at Webster 
Hall. 

Shedd & Blanchard, for a velocipede rink at Wil- 
liams Hall. 

George & Chipman, lor a velocipede rink at 35 
Sudbury street. 

Isaac L. Pratt, for a velocipede rink at 187 Sum- 
mer street. 

J. Austin Rogers, for a velocipede rink at 2109 
Washington street. 

Parker & McNiel, for a velocipede rink at corner 
of Springfield and Washington streets. 

F. H. Lead worth, for a velocipede rink at C6 Port- 
land street. 

Ciosby & Haines, for a velocipede rink at 185 
Hanover street. 

Pearl & Co., for a transfer of license for a veloci- 
pede rink at Sumner Hall. 

Chickering & Sons, for leave to give public ex- 
hibitions, &c, at their hall in Washington street. 

J. Wentworth,for leave to give public perform- 
ances at the Theatre Comique. 

Timothy Collins, for a sparring exhibition at 
Theatre Comique. 

Alderman Pratt raised the question whether the 
wagon licenses, heretofore referred to, were new 
ones or transfers of old ones. 

Alderman White, in reply, stated that the wagon 
licenses were new and the committee had exer- 
cised discrimination in granting such licenses, ob- 
jecting to permitting them in business and crowd- 
ed localities, and giving a preference to such 
places as were out of the way. Many licenses had 
been refused. The licenses granted" were for tha 
Highlands, the extreme South End, South and 
East Boston. 

Alderman Richards, from the Committee on the 
Fire Department, reported a new draft of the or- 
dinance in relation to the Fire Department, in- 
creasing the number of Assistant Engineers from 
twelve to thirteen, two of them to reside at East 
Boston. The ordinance was passed. 

Alderman James, from the committee to nomi- 
nate candidates for fence viewers, made a report 
which was accepted . 

The Board proceeded to an election of fence 
viewers, when Wm. T. Hight, Moses Gragg and 
Jonn Dove were unanimously chosen, each receiv- 
ing twelve votes. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on Streets, 
reported no action necessary on sundry notices of 
intention to build. Accepted. 

Alderman White, from the Committee on Health, 
reported an order to abate certain nuisances, 
Adopted. 



Alderman James, from the Committee on Pav- 
ing, on the petition of Alpheus Hardy and others, 
submitted the following order: 

Ordered, That that part of Court street extend- 
ing from Washington street to Tremont street and 
Cornhill be hereafter called and known as State 
street, in continuation of the street now known 
by that name. 

On motion of Alderman James, the report and 
order were laid on the table. 

Aldeiman Hawes, from the Committee on Steam 
Engines, made a report in favor of granting the 
petition of Milo Whitney, for leave to put up and 
maintain a steam engine at No. 1057 Washington 
street. Accepted. 

Alderman Seaver, from the Committee on the 
Market, reported in tavor of the transfer of several 
market leases specified. Accepted. 

Alderman Talbot, from Committee on Streets, 
reported leave to withdraw on the petition for the 
extension of Eaton street through Seabury place 
to Blossom street. Accepted. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Special Committee 
to whom was referred all matters in interest be- 
tween the city of Boston and fte Boston & Al- 
bany Railroad Co., made a report, recommending 
the adoption ot the iollowing order: 

Ordered, that the Board adopt and establish the 
revised grades ot Harrison avenue, Pine street, 
Seneca street, Way street, Curve street, ana East 
Castle straet, as s lownon plans and profiles drawn 
by the City Surveyor, dated Nov. 23, 1868, and de- 
posited in the office of said City Surveyor. 

Alderman Talbot asked for the immediate pas- 
sage of the order, as the revised grade involved, 
the raising of the several bridges of the Boston & 
Albany Railroad. 

Alderman Pratt inquired if the proposed action 
would not be a disadvantage to the public, for it 
was understood '.hat the high grade ot the. bridge 
on Ferdinand street gave great dissatisfaction. 

Alderman Talbot remarked that so far as related 
to Ferdinand street, the ascent to which was easy, 
the railroad company were willing to lower the 
bridge. Some of the bridges were so .low 
that the sleeping cars could not get under 
them without breaking their tops. The com- 
mittee had been met in a kindly spirit by 
the railroad corporation, which was willing to as-: 
sume the expense of raising tiie bridges. It was 
proposed to give authority to raise these bridges, 
one at a time, and the others will come along in a 
week or two. 

Alderman Pratt said he favored facilities for 
travel as much as any one ; but if the measure 
should produce a grade like that at present on 
Tremont street, he should object. The order to 
adopt the above grades was then passed. 

' ORDERS PASSED. 

On motion of Alderman James, 

Ordered, That the Board establish the revised 
grade of Tremont street, between Church street 
and the bridge over the tracks of the Boston & 
Albany Railroad Company, as shown on a plan 
made by the City Surveyor, dated October 28, 1867, 
and deposited in the office of the said City Sur- 
veyor. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of the Com- 
mon and Squares be authorized under the direc- 
tion of the Committee on Common and Squares to 
grade and lay out the ground around the Wash- 
ington Statue, Public Garden, at an expense not 
exceeding $5500, said amount to be charged to the 
appropriation for Common and Public Squares. 

On motion of Alderman Richards, 

Ordered, That the Board of Engineers of the 
Fire Department be requested to report what 
action has been taken under a recommendation of 
this Board adopted in 1868 (City Document 119), in 
relation to wooden buildings located in this city 
in violation of law. 

Alderman Richards, in support of the order, 
stated that the Board of Engineers was requested 
last year to make a report on the subject of the vi- 
olation of the law in relation to the erection of 
wooden buildings. They made a report, and it ap- 
peared that some parties intended to go on in vio- 
lation ot the law, while others did not. The Board 
of Engineers should inform this Board whether it 
is possible to enforce the law, and if it could not 
be enforced, and a change is necessary, let us 
make it. 

On motion of Alderman Talbot, 

Ordered, That there be paid to the heirs ofThom- 



44 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



as Leach and the heirs of Joshua Brewster $14,- 

000 for land taken and damages occasioned by the 
widening of Bowker street, formerly Adams street, 
by a resolve passed Nov. 8, 1867. ■ - 

Ordered, That the Committee on laying Out and 
"Widening Streets be and they are hereby author- 
ized to sell at public auction the two estates on 
Richmond street, between Hanover and Salem 
streets, belonging to the city of Boston, which 
were surrendered to the said city- under the bet- 
terment law by Frederick Gould, and that the pro- 
ceeds ol the sale be paid into the City Treasury, 

On motion of Alderman Talbot, 

Ordered, That the safety and convenience of the 
inhabitants of the city require the widening of 
Harrison avenue on its southeasterly side, - near 
the corner of Hover street, by taking land of heirs 

01 Wm. Richardson, containing 239 2-10 square 
feet, at a cost of $178 40. 

On motion of Alderman "White, 

Ordered, That the sum of $500 be added to the 
appropriation heretofore made for the purpose of 
supplying soup to persons in necessitous circum- 
stances, said sum to be charged to the appropria- 
tions for Police. 

Ordered, That three members of this Board be 
appointed to visit the several prisons and houses 
of detention, in the county of Suffolk, ac least 
twice during the present year, and make the ex- 
amination and reports required by the statutes ot 
this Commonwealtn. Aldermen James, Richards 
and Seaver, the Committee on Institutions at South 
Boston and Beer Island, were appointed the Com- 
mittee under this order. 

On motion of Alderman Seaver, 

Ordered, That the Committee on Police be au- 
thorized to - procure furniture, bedding, and such 
other articles as are necessary to properly furnish 
the Police Station House in Ward Fifteen, the ex-, 
pense thereof, not exceeding the sum of twenty- 
three hundred dollars, to be charged to the ap- 
propriation for Police. 

On motion of Alderman Talbot, an order was 
passpd for the laying out ot Bristol street, from 
Harrison avenue to Albany street, forty feet in 
width, by taking land of neirs of Wm.Bichard- 
son, land of John S. Blair and the city of Boston, 
at an expense ot $19,973. 

Alderman White offered the following orders: 

Ordered, That the Committee on Public Build- 
ings be authorized to purchase a lot of land at the 
junction of Warren and Dudley streets, owned by 
Henry W. Walker, and containing 7026 square feet 
of land, more or less, for the purpose of having 
erected thereon a building to contain accommo- 
dations for Hook and Ladder Company No. 4, and a 
ward room for Ward Fourteen, the cost ot said 
land not to exceed the sum of $10,000. 

Ordered, That the Treasurer be authorized to 
borrow, under the direction of the Committee on 
Finance, the sum of $10,000, to be applied to the 
purpose of a site lor a Hook and Ladder House. 
Ke-d and laid on the table. 



CITY HOSPITAL. 

A communication was presented by Alderman 
Bradlee, from the Trustees of the City Hospital, 
asking tor an additional appropriation of $5900, to 
meet the current expenses ot the Hospital. The 
Trustees refer to the anticipated expenses of the 
Hospital from the annexation of Roxbury, and 
remark that the addition of patients had been 
much larger than was anticipated. The average 
had been 172 against 135 last year. Referred to 
Committee on City Hospital. 

ORDERS OF NOTICE. 

On motion of Alderman Talbot an order of notice 
was adopted on proposed laying out and widening 
of Bennett avenue, on the northeasterly side 
thereof. Hearing Monday, March 8, 4 P. M. - 

On the proposed widening of the easterly side of 
West Cedar street, between Revere and Phillips 
streets. Hearing, Monday, March 8, 4 P. M. 

To hear parties interested in the question 
of damages occasioned by the laying out of 
Avon plai'.e as a public street, and of parties to be 
assessed for betterments on account of the open- 
ing of said' street. Hearing Monday, March 8th, 
4 P.M. 

THE SALARY BILL. 

On motion of Alderman Talbot, the Salary bill 
was taken from the table. 

Alderman Talbot offered the following amend- 
ments, of which he had previously given notice : 

"Amend the Second Section 01 the order printed 
on page 13 (City Hoc. 17) so that it shall read as 
follows : 

Section 2. The salary of the First Assistant 
Assessors shall be at the rate of six dollars; and 
the salary of the Second Assistant Assessors at 
the rate of live dollars, for each and every day of 
actual service while engaged in street duty or re- 
vising assessments; and there shall be paid a 
further sum of three hundred dollars to each First 
Assistant Assessor, and two hundred and fifty 
dollars to each Second Assistant Assessor for at- 
tending all the sessions of the Board, composed of 
the Assessors and First and Second Assistants; 
and for non-attendance, there shall be deducted a 
pro rata amount. The amount of service rendered 
by the several Assistant Assessors, shall be certi- 
fied by the Secretary of the Board." 

Also, add the following section : 

"Section 3. The sessions of the Board shall be 
held daily, beginning on the 16th day of June, and 
shall not terminate sooner than the 7th day of 
August, unless dissolved by the Board of Asses- 
sors." 

After some explanations by the mover, the 
amendments were adopted, and the Salary bill, as 
amended, was passed. 

Adjourned. 



45 



COMMON COUNCIL 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 

FEB. 25, 1869. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Common 
Council was held at 7>£ o'clock this evening, Wm. 
G. Harris, the .President, in the chair. 

PAPERS FROM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

Several petitions from the Board of Aldermen 
were referied in concurrence. 

The request ot Trustees of the City Hospital, 
for an additional appropriation of $5000, was re- 
ferred to the Committee on City Hospital, in con- 
currence. 

The order authorizing to be sold by auction two 
estates on llichmond street, between Hanover and 
Salem streets, which were surrendered to the city 
by Fred. Gould, under the Betterment Law, was 
passed, in concurrence. 

The order authorizing twenty dollars and ninety- 
five cents, with interest thereon, to be refunded to 
Isaac Samuels, the principal being the amount 
paid by him tor a defective tax title on an estate 
in Springer place, being under consideration, 

Mr. Keith of "Ward Fifteen made some inquiry 
relative thereto, and oppospd the allowance of 
such claims, on the ground that the city did not 
guarantee such titles, and as parties usually pur- 
chased them on speculation, they ran their own 
risk, and could have no claim upon the city to 
make them good. 

Mr. Gray of Ward Twelve said this matter had 
been in the hands of the Committee on the Asses- 
sors' Department, who had reported favoraldy 
thereon. The City Solicit- or had been consulted, 
and approved the same. 

The order was referred to the Committee on 
Claims. 

The reference to Committee on Public Buildings 
of order setting apart a portion of land in Ward 
Fifteen for the use of the Water Board, was con- 
curred in. 

The Ordinance to amend an Ordinance in relation 
to the Fire Department was passed in concur- 
rence. 

The resolve and order for laying out Bristol 
street, between Harrison avenue and Albany 
street, coming up for the actijn of the Council, 

On motion of Mr. Klynn of Ward Seven, it was 
referred to the Committee on Streets of the Com- 
mon Council. 

Mr. Wadsworth of "Ward Four said he had some 
recollection of action on this subject, either in the 
present Council or that ot last y ear, the city to 
give one-halt the land and the owner of the rest of 
the laEd tbe other half. 

The certificate of the election ot Superintendent 
of Dover Street Bridge was received from the 
Board of Aldermen. 

ELECTION OF SUPERINTENDENT OF DOVER STREET 
BRIDGE. 

Messrs. Braman of Ward Six, Gray of Ward 
Twelve, and Ryan of "Ward Thirteen, were ap- 
pointed a committee to receive, sort and count the 
votes. 

The committee reported as follows : 

Whole number of votes 51 

Necessary to a choice 2G 

Angus Nelson 35 

Richard Cook 9 

Martin Kussell 7 

Mr. Nelson was declared to be elected again in 
non-concurrence. 

ELECTION OF FENCE VIEWERS. 

Messrs. Wilkins of Ward Nine, Lucas of Ward 
Seven, and Poor ot Ward Eleven, were appointed 
a committee to receive, sort and count the votes. 

Mr. Woolley of Ward One said he was author- 
ized to withdraw the name of Wm. T. Hight, elect- 
ed by the other Board, and he proposed in his 
place the name of John Noble. 



The committee reported as follows: 

Whole number of votes 50 

Necessary to a choice 26 

Moses Gragg 50 

John Dove 50 

John Noble 31 

E.W. James 7 

Wm. T. Hight 4 

Geo.P.Darrow 3 

Coleman Cook 3 

G. C. Judson 2, B. F. Butler 1 3 

Messrs. Gragg, Dove ana Noble were declared 
to be elected, the last in non-concurrence. 

The Chair called attention to the impropriety of 
the practice of voting for persons not eligible, or 
of trifling in tbe balloting for public officers. 

The Salary bill, City Document No. 13, was taken 

U P- m 

Mr. Ingalls of Ward Twelve moved that it be 

read once by its title, and that its consideration 
take place in the next stage; meantime the mem- 
bers would have an opportunity oi examining it 
and be piepa/ed to offer amendments, if so dis- 
posed. 

The motion was carried aud the bill was read 
once. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

The order to transfer from "Soldiers' and Sail- 
ors' Monument," $10,000; and from "Police" $15,- 
000, to the Appropriation for Paving, etc.; from 
"Primary School Instructors," $10,000, to the Ap- 
propriation for Grammar Schools, and from the 
"Reserved Fund" $1200, to the Appropriation for 
Bridges, was considered. 

Mr; Hobbs of Ward Fourteen inquired whether 
in the transfer of the several appropriations spec- 
ified the vote was to be upon them all at once. 

The Chair replied that the vote was given in one 
answer. 

The order was passed by a unanimous vote. 

The order authorizing the Treasurer to borrow 
$72,000, to be added to the appropriation called the 
Oliver Street Temporary Loan — printed City Doc- 
ument No. 23, 1869— being on its passage, Mr. 
Flynn of Ward Seven moved that it be referred to 
the Committee on Streets of the Common Council. 
Carried. 

AUDITOR'S ESTIMATES FOR THE FINANCIAL YEAR 
1869-70. 
A report was laid before the Council from the 
City Auditor, giving his estimates of the receipts 
and expenditures for the financial year commenc- 
ing first of May next, together with the amount 
which will be required as a tax to meet such ex- 
penditures. Some ot the principal statements 
are as follows: 

Estimated expenditures $8,554,754 

Estimated income 1,487,450 

Leaving to be provided for 7,067,304 

To which add 3 per cent, for tbe amount 
of taxes which will not be paid into the 
Treasury during the financial year 212,020 

Total amount to be raised by taxation 7,279,324 

Compared with last year's tax, the above 

statement shows an increase of. 1,394,495 

Estimated tax for 1869 7,279,324 

Estimated tax for 1868 5,884,629 

Making an increase as above $1,394,495 

The principal items of this increase are, interest 
on the city debt proper, $371,000; on the water 
debt, $127,000; paving and grading streets, $300,- 
000; State tax, $180,000; City debt, $160,000. 

The interest account is greatly augmented by the 
increase of debt for street improvements made oy 
the last City Government, for prosecuting the 
work on the Chestnut Hill reservoir, for introduc- 
ing the water into the Boston Highlands, and to 
meet the interest on loans to be made for matured 
and contemplate^ building and street widening 
and opening projects by the present City Council. 

The amount for paving and grading ot streets is 
necessarily increased by the extensive widening of 
old streets and the opening of new thoroughfares 
now in progress which require to be graded and 
paved as soon as tbe removal of the buildings is ac- 
complished; the amount borrowed for nearly all 
the undertakings not covering the expenses of 
putting the streets in order for travel, but only tbe 
amount needed for land and building damages. 



FEBRUARY 



a 5 



18 6 9. 



46 



v^ e ,°w i ^ in &, 1 n 1 nn 0p 1 ri: l ti - ( l n lor <*• department last 
L, - i «300,000, but it was increased by trans- 
fers during the year to $400,000. 

The amount of the tax levied by the State of 
Massachusetts last year on the several cities and 
towns of the Commonwealth was $2,000,000, and 
tins year the Finance Committee of the House of 
Representatives have voted that a tax ot $2,500,- 
000 will be needed, ami of this increase of $500,000 

$1% 785 Ve t0 Pay 3G ' 157 Pel ' Cent -> e( * ual t0 

The amount asked for under the head of Citv 
Zv!£i 1S r T l ' ed , by the Ordinance on Finance, 
which provides that three per cent, at least shall 
be taxed on all the debt outstandii.fr, which sum 
goes into the Sinking Fund for its redemption. 

The Auditor gives a table comparing the esti- 
mated appropriations of last year, ancf concedes 
as follows: 

Total increase of estimated appropriations for 
1869-70 «j gfjg gjg 

Less, decrease of appropriation. . '.'.!'.'.'.'.'.'. '236,'971 

Net increase $1 ^2 678 

Estimated income of 18G9-70 $l'i87'450 

1 -868-69 l',V8fi5Q 

Giving cin increase of income of . . . . $108,800 

PER CENTAGE ON TAXES. 

Three per cent, on amount required 

1809-70 ($7,248,301), * $212,020 

ibree percent, on amount 1868-9 

($5,713,426). $171,403 

Increase of per centage $40 617 

^ T . . RECAPITULATION. 

Net increase of appropriations 1869-70. . . .$1,462,678 
Increase of revenue 108 809 

... $1,353,878 

Add increase per centage on taxes 40,617 

Total increase tax 1869-70...... $1,394,495 

The estimates were referred to the Committee 
on Finance, with such as the Board of Aldermen 
may join , with authority to report in print. 

ORDERS PASSED. 

On motion of Mr. Flynn of Ward Seven, 

Ordered, That the Committee on Public Build- 
ings consider and report upon the expediency of 
erecting a new Police Station House in the Sixth 
District. 

On motion of Mr. Tucker of Ward Six, 

Ordered, That a committee b3 appointed, with 
such as the Board of Aldermen may join, to nom- 
inate an additional Assistant Engineer of" the Fire 
Department, to reside at East Boston. 

Messrs. Tucker of Ward Six, Hall of Ward One 
and Kingsbury of Ward Fifteen, were appointed 
the committee on the part of the Council. 

On motion of Mr. Kingsbury of Ward Fifteen: 

Ordered, That the Committee on Water consider 
and report upon the expediency of putting the 
Lowry hydrants in the Church Street District, 
the same having been lately put into the Highland 
District. 

An order was passed for the payment of bills of 
persons directly or indirectly connected with the 
City Government. 

Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteen moved a reconsidera- 
tion of the vote whereby the order authorizing the 
Committee on the Harbor to make repairs on the 
steam dredging machine was denied a second 
reading. 

Mr. D<mny of Ward Ten said he was subjected to 
various questions and interrogatories at the last 
meeting of the Council which he was unable to 
answer. Some of the questions should more 
properly have been made to the committee of last 
year. Not beine; on that committee, he could not 
answer them, but a gentleman who was present, 
and who was on that committee, might have much 
more readily given the information asked for. To 
satisfy the Council, he had endeavored to obtain 
the information which was required, and trusted 
they would listen patiently to what he had to say 
on the subject. 

Mr. Denny said it would be necessary to go into 
a history of the dredging machine. On inquiry he 
found that the apprehensions of the cholera in 1866 
led to the adoption of measures by which such 



danger would be warded off or lessened. The ac- 
cumulation of deposits from sewers was a cause 
of apprehension, more particularly from the 
neighborhood of Charles river. An 'order was is- 
sued by the Board of Health to the owners of 
docks to cause their docks to be -dredged out; 
their reply was that they could not make the ex- 
cavations for want ot a dredging machine. It 
was found that but one dredging machine could 
be had, and that was nut m a condition to be used, 
without repairs. 

The result of the consultation and investigation 
was that a contract was made lor the building of a 
dredging machine, with the scows and all the ap- 
paratus necessary, at a cost of $40,000. It was the 
opinion of Mr. Boschke that its use would be re- 
quired for eight months in the year for the various 
purposes needed. Its advantages to the city had 
been fully set forth in the report of Major- General 
Foster, in charge of the improvements in the har- 
bor. 

In the work of dredging required by the Govern- 
ment, Gen. Foster states in his report that a con- 
tract was made with Charles Woolley of this city, 
the ©nly person owninsr a dredging machine be- 
sides that of the city, who after working a part of 
a day, refused to comply with the terms of the con- 
tract and gave it up. The only other party who 
made a bid was Mr. Wright of New York, who was 
notified of the acceptance of his bid. Mr. Wright 
replied, that on learning that Mr. Woolley had 
obtained the contract, he had sold his dredging 
machine, and his contract was transferred to Mr. 
Boschke. 

The advantages of the construction of this ma- 
chine could be seen in this, that without it, if the 
city had wanted the deposits of the sewers remov- 
ed and had depended upon Mr. Woolley, in what 
condition would it have been? By reference to 
the Auditor's books, it appeared that the cost ot 
the dredging machine, with the scow, all the ap- 
paratus and repairs, amounted to $48,606 35. The 
receipts on account of the machine had been $20,- 
291 88, which made a cost to the, city of $28,000, 
realizing forty per cent, income besides doing the 
work of the city. 

Mr. Boschke had paid up all Ms indebtedness for 
the use of the machine. On an examination of the 
machine, while he might be satisfied that it would 
run six months or possibly a year, without repair, 
yet it a cog-wheel or a cylinder head should give 
way, he should consider it advisable that every- 
thing should be done to it which might be necessa- 
ry. Prudence, economy arid good judgment would 
dictate that it should be done today, rather than 
any risk shouldbe incurred in the delay of repairing 
it, should repairs be found to be necessary. 

Let the repairs be made, and the machine may 
be let on advantageous terms the coming year. 
He was aware that members of the Council were 
sometimes called upon to vote blindly, and did 
not blame members for wishing information, but 
he had been assured that this might meet with op- 
position in certain quarters, and that opposition 
sufficient would be found to block the wheels in 
the passage of this order. 

Mr. Denny urged the reconsideration of 
the vote rejecting the order, so that such 
repairs as were lound necessary may be 
made, and a delay by which the eity loses $40 
or $50 a day shall be prevented. The repairs hereto- 
fore had been done in an economical manner. 
Most of the expenditures required would be upon 
the scows, which needed caulking and bracing. 
About $600 or $700 would probably be needed upon 
the machinery. The question had been asked 
whether a boiler was put in last year. A boiler 
was put in, at a cost of $500, of which Mr. Boschke 
paid one half and the city the other. 

Mr. Woolley of Ward One said he felt required 
to answer some reflections which had been cast 
upon him. The reflection on his partner, Charles 
Woolley, he took no part of. Yet so tar as refer- 
ence was made to his contract for dredging, in- 
stead of working but half a day he went down 
the harbor and siayed there three weeks. He 
then gave up the contract, forfeited his bonds and 
paid them. In reference to the work done by this 
machine for the city, the only work done was at 
foot of Poplar street, and this, instead of being 
done at his estimate of $1200, cost the city 
$1750. Other jobs which were attempted it failed 
in doing. 
Mr. Denny said he had been carelul not to re- 



47 



COMMON COUNCIL. 



liect on tbe gentleman from Ward One, whom he 
nid not know in the matter, and so tar as related 
to the contract with Charles Woolley, he had read 
what was said in the report of the Harbor Commis- 
sioners and in that of Gen. Foster. As to the 
work done by this machine for tbe city, besides 
the work at the foot of Poplar street, dredging 
had been done at the mouth of Charles river. 

Mr. Wells of Ward Three said he could tell of 
some of the work done by this machine for this 
city. This machine was used to dredge out the 
slips of the East Boston Ferry, causing the wall 
to fall down, and Mr .Woolley had to be employed 
to put it up. 

Mr. Woolley replied further relative to reflection 
on him, that \t was charged that personal influence 
had ueen used to defeat this order. He did not 
know that the order was to be brought up at the 
last meeting of the Council. 

Mr. Jenks of Ward Three said he was opposed 
to the order on the ground that the amount of ap- 
propriations should first be ascertained, and that 
committees should not be constantly coming to 
the Council tor increase of appropriations. They 
might just as well commence with this to stop the 
practice. 

Mr. Hall of Ward One did not with to clog the 
wheels in making appropriations. If this machine 
needed repairs, let it be put in repair; if it was 
worth anything— although he might sometime 
raise that question — let it be repaired and the 
work go on. He should accordingly vote for the 
appropriation tonight. 

The motion to reconsider was carried, and the 
order was passed that the Committee on Harbor 
be authorized to expend not exceeding $3000, for 
repairs on the dredging machine, scows, &c. 

Mr. Denny further remarked in relation to the 
delay of which he spoke, that he did not wish to 
say that the blocking of wheels was in any other 
than a legitimate way. 

Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteen moved to take up the 
ordinance to amend an ordinance in relation to 
streets, postponed to this meeting. Carried. 

Mr. Keith said he had examined this ordinance 
with some care since the last meeting of the Coun- 
cil. He found on investigation that an ordinance 
similar to this was passed in 1832, with exceptions 
to its provisions in favor of South Boston. This 
was subseauently revised and the ordinance was 
changed to the form in which it now exists. He 
had amendments to propose, in favor of outlying 
districts similar to those formerly in favor of 



South Boston, and it might be found necessary to 
apply them to Ward One, or elsewhere. These 
amendments were to except Wards Thirteen, Four- 
teen and Fifteen, from the provisions of the ordi- 
nance, and to provide in those wards, that if a snow 
storm ceases in the night, until 11 o'clock in the 
forenoon be allowed for the removal of the snow 
from tbe walks, and that three hours shall be al- 
lowed after the ceasing of a snow storm m the day 
time. 

Mr. Keith said it would be necessary that he 
should state again some of the difficulties which 
would prevent the enforcement of the present pro- 
visions ofthe ordinance in some sections. Heknew 
of instances where at least 2000 feet of sidewalk 
would reauire to be cleared, and it would be im- 
possible to have it done in the time required. 
Many of the residents in those wards do business 
in this part of the city, and they could not des- 
patch a man in season to clear the snow after the 
close of a storm, nor could they go home to do it 
themselves in season. He, therefore, moved these 
amendments, indicating the changes which would 
be required in the language of the ordinance. 

Mr. Osborn of Ward Six moved a recommit- 
ment of the ordinance, with the amendment pro- 
posed. 

Mr. Ingalls of Ward Twelve moved to include 
Ward Twelve in the amendment of Mr. Keith. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward Seven said he should pro- 
pose also to include Ward Seven. 

Mr. Hall of Ward One proposed also to include 
that Ward. 

The Chair ruled these last motions out, two 
amendments being already pending. 

Mr. Jenks of Ward Three said he should like to 
propose a new section to include Ward Three. 

The motion to recommit was carried. 

Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteen inquired what had 
become of the report on joint rules and orders 
which was recommitted some weeks since. The 
difficulties which were to be remedied in the 
prsposed amendments had heen experienced to- 
night, when a call was made that a report should 
be read by its title, and it proved that it had no 
title. 

Mr. Tucker of Ward Six, of the committee, said 
the matter went to the joint committee, and re- 
quiring action by the other branch, he had not 
heen notified of any meeting for action, and noth- 
ing had been done on the subject. 

Adjourned. 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



48 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 
MARCH 1, 1869. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Board of Al- 
dermen was held tbis afternoon at lour o'clock, 
Mayor Shur Jeff in the chair. 

APPOINTMENTS MADE AND CONFIRMED. 

John L. Cook, as Sergeant of Police, for duty at 
the City Hall. 
Joseph S. Blye, as an undertaker. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

Geo. W. Decatur, for leave to run fifteen coaches 
lrom the Highlands to the Fitchburg station. Re- 
ferred to the Committee on Licenses. 

Chas. W. Lawrence, for license as an auctioneer. 
Referred to Committee on Licenses. 

John Barnard, that a portion of a dangerous 
wall of house No. 23 Rochester street may be de- 
clared a nuisance and removed accordingly. Re- 
ferred to the Committee on Police. 

Managers of Discharged Soldiers' Home, for an 
appropriation to lepair the Alms House in the 
Highland District. Referred to the Committee on 
Public Institutions. 

Mary Faxon, for abatement of assessment for a 
sewer in Washington street. Referred to Commit- 
tee on Sewers. 

William Maguire, for leave to box around his 
estate on Rochester street and Harbison avenue. 
Referred to Committee on Paving. 

Alvah KittredTe and others, that Linwood street 
and Highland avenue be laid out as public streets. 
Referred to Committee on Streets. 

Manufacturers' Exchange, that the city would 
indicate the terms and conditions upon which 
they may enjoy their franchise. Referred to the 
Committee on Streets, with such as tbe Common 
Council may join. 

NOTICES OF INTENTION TO BUILD. 

C. J. Spenceley, corner of Lenox and Sawyer 
streets; W. A. Woodward, corner of Warren and 
Winthrop streets ; John Joyce, corner C and Third 
streets; Maurice Curry, rear of 212 Fourth street; 
Jacob Nauer, 1094 Tremont street; Patrick Kain, 
N street, hetween Fourth and Fifth streets; N. J. 
Bradlee, 9, 11 and 13 Cambridge street; Ivory 
Harmon, crrner Perrin and Moreland streets; 
Ivory Emmons, 273 Tremont street ; Charles E. 
Lane, Mount Warren place: E. A. Richards, East 
Dover street; Holbrook& Harlow, Fourth street, 
between G and H streets ; Chamberlain & Mars- 
ton, Waltham street, hetween Shawmut avenue 
and Tremont street ; Henry Flynn, Fourth street, 
between B and C streets; Thos. K. Daunt, Norfolk 
place; Barnes & Barker, 31 First street ; Barnard 
& Lancaster, 240 North street; Dennis Carroll, 
Eighth street, between E and F streets ; N. Wheel- 
er & Co., 421 Washington street. Severally re- 
ferred to the Committee on Streets. 

COMMON COUNCIL PAPERS. 

Petitions from the Common Council were re- 
ferred, in concurrence. 

Tbe Auditor's estimate fcr the next financial 
year, 1809-70, was referred on the part of the Board 
t^ Aldermen Richards, of the Committee on Pub- 
lic Buildings, Seaver, on Police, Fairbanks, on 
Sewers, Talhot, on Streets, and White, on the Po- 
lice, in concurrence with tbe Committee of the 
Common Council. 

ELECTION OF FENCE VIEWER. 

The election of one fence viewer was taken up, 
wnen John Noble was chosen by an unanimous 
vote, in concurrence. 

ELECTION OF SUPERINTENDENT OF DOVER 
STREET BRIDGE. 

Balloting took place as follows, for a Superin- 
tendent ot Dover Street Bridge : 

1st Ballot. 2d Ballot. 3d Ballot. 
"Whole numher of votes. 12 12 12 

Necessary to a choice.. . 7 7 7 

AngusNelson 6 6 7 

Richard Cook 5 6 5 

Martin Russell 1 



On the third ballot Angus Nelson was declared 
to be elected in concurrence. 

Aldermen Hawes and Richards were joined to 
the committee to nominate an Assistant Engineer 
of the Fire Department for i.ast Boston. 

The following orders were passed in concur- 
rence: 

Order to pay certain bills of members ot the 
City Government. 

Order for Committee on Water to consider the 
expediency of locating Lowry hydrants on the 
Church Street territory. 

Order tor repair of steam dredging machine at 
an expense ot $3000. 

Order tor Committee on Public Buildings to 
caasider the expediency ot erecting a Police Sta- 
tion House in the Sixth District. 

Order to refund 820 H5 to Isaac Samuels, for 
error in purchase of tax title;— (referred to Com- 
mittee on Claims.) 

Ordinance to amend an ordinance in relation to 
streets (removal of ice and snow)— (referred to 
Committee on Ordinances.) 

THE BURRILL CLAIM. 

Alderman James submitted the following com- 
munication from the City Solicitor, in reply to the 
request of the Board: 

Hir : In compliance with the order of the Board 
of Aldermen, passed the 23d ult., requesting me 
to inform the Board in regard to the present "con- 
dition ot the suit ol Charles Burrill vs. the City ot 
Boston, 1 have the boner to state that the suit is 
still pending in the Supreme Court of the United 
States, to which it was removed by Mr. Burrill, by 
a writ of error, soon after the verdict in favor o*f 
the city in tbe 0. S. Circuit Court. It is not prob- 
able that the case will be reached for argument at 
Washington before the next term of the Court, in 
December next. Mr. Burrill's counsel have re- 
cently notified me that the suit will not he further 
prosecuted, and that no further effort will be made 
by Mr. Burrill, to recover the claim he makes, by 
any legal means. 

Read once and placed on file. 

ANNEXATION OF DORCHESTER. 

A report was received from the Commissioners 
appointed to consider and report to the City Coun- 
cil on the subject of annexing a portion or the 
whole of the territory of Dorchester to the City of 
Boston. 

The Commissioners refer to the previous mea- 
sures in relation to the annexation ot Dorchester, 
by Commissioners on the subject and petition to 
the Legislature, ana remark: 

ifour Commissioners have carefully considered 
tbe subject intrusted to them. Assisted by an ac- 
curate map of Dorchester, made by the City Sur- 
veyor, showing its boundaries, water shed, harbor 
and river lines and streets, they have personally 
examined the territory. They have also held fre- 
quent conferences with an intelligent committee, 
appointed by citizens of that town, upon the bear- 
ings of the proposed annexation upon the sepa- 
rate interests committed to their charge. The 
substanca of these opinions, with other informa- 
tion upon the financial, industrial and sanitary 
condition of the town, they give in the report. 

As bad effects of past neglect, the commission- 
ers deem it a misfortune of the city of Boston hith- 
erto, to be governed by necessity rather than 
choice in tbe improvements which the advancing 
tide of business and population has rendered es- 
sential to the comfort and convenience of its cit- 
izens. Its peninsular situation, antt the conforma- 
tion of its territory interfered at the beginning, 
natural obstacles to the adoption of a uniform sys- 
tem of streets and squares, in which the element 
of space should Lave due consideration. They say 
further, that there was no effort ma3e in its early 
history to surmount these obstacles, and we have 
before us at the present time in the widening of 
several ot our public streets a conspicuous illustra- 
tion of the statement that the past neglect had 
fixed upon the present generation the expense ot 
adapting the streets to the uses of an overflowing 
population. 

While the founders of the city were deficient in 
the first duty of their time in the laying out of 
streets on some regular plan, there is danger 
that we may render ourselves liable to the 
charge of a similar short-3ightedness. The 
Commissioners make estimates of the pros- 
pective increase of population, based on the past 



49 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN, 



increase, in which they conclude as follows : in 
the year 1880, without ' accessions trona annexa- 
tion, 300,000; in 1890, 360,000, and upwards; 
in 1900, 450,000. Such a population they say 
cannot be compressed within the existing 
limits of the city. Some portions of it may find 
accommodations on the Back Bay, but a greater 
part will be obliged, if desirous of enjoying its 
privileges, to occupy South Boston or the High- 
lands. The Back Bay territory is limited and will 
continue to be occupied for a considerable time, 
at least, by the more wealthy class of our citizens. 

South Boston, with its prospective extended 
area of filled land, it is believed, will become the 
seat of extensive manufacturing industries, with 
the freighting business of railroads. The High- 
lands are left, then, as the only tern' ory on that 
side ot the city accessible to persons who prefer 
to remain within the limits, and yet wish 
to avail themselves of the better sanitary 
condition of the suburbs. The importance of 
retaining the industrial classes of our community 
within the city limits, they say, cannot be overes- 
timated. To retain such men, we must be able to 
give them land at moderate prices. They will al- 
ways remain in the city if they can live as cheap- 
ly and comlortably as elsewhere, not oily becau-e 
the interests of their labor are here, but because 
of its better facilities of education, recreation, 
libraries, and other advantages which the mterop- 
olis affords. For these reasons the money invest- 
ed in building up compact villages in the near 
suburbs should be applied within the limits ot the 
city. 

Much ot the Boston capital invested in Chicago, 
New York and elsewhere, it is argued, should be 
invested here, but will not be so long as Boston 
maintains its present contracted limits. If the 
present stats ot things should be permitted to 
continue, the city will ultimately be left to the 
care ot the very rich and the very poor. After re- 
ferring to the continual encroachments of busi- 
ness upon population, and the annexation of 
Roxbury as a step in the right direction to 
meet the wants of the city for residences, it is said 
that timely provision should be made lor tho ac- 
quisition of territory ot large capacity bordering 
closely upon the city, in the direction of the move- 
ment of population, best adapted to our existing 
system of water distribution, drainage, &c. The 
territory of Dorchester, it is believed, can be 
shaped at small expense for the healthful occupa- 
tion of our increasing population, and this is de- 
scribed as follows: 

'■It has a large area of high land, well adapted 
for residences, and its situation is such that it can 
he easily and cheaply drained. Its north ana west 
boundaries, following those of the city, interseet 
neighborhoods that have lived in common for gen- 
erations. Indeed, so undefined and obscure are 
these limits, that a non-resident would find it dif- 
ficult to tell where the territory of Dorchester be- 
gins or that of the city ends, Ihese lines cut many 
streets at right angles, thus rendering impossible, 
in the existing state of things, any general and 
comprehensive system of street and sewerage im- 
provement, it has a navigable harbor and 
river line on the east ot about three miles in 
extent, and a continuous river line above, 
navigable to Lower Mills, and reaching to within 
a short distance of its southern limit, with 
valuable deep water at Commercial Point and 
Port Norfolk, affording sites for wharves, facto- 
ries, ship yards, &c, unsurpassed by any in the 
vicinity of Boston. Vessels drawing from eight- 
een to twenty feet can come up to Commercial 
Point, and sixteen feet at high water to Port 
Norfolk. The Old Colony & Newport Railroad, 
with the passenger station in the town, runs 
within a quarter of a mile of the shore, crossing 
the river at Port Norfolk, from whence the Dor- 
chester & Milton Branch Railroad runs near the 
river to Mattapan. 

The Hartford & Erie Railroad passes through the 
entire territory with five passenger stations there- 
on, while the Metropolitan Railroad intersects 
the town with three distinct lines of track. The 
distance from the farthest station in the town to 
State street is accomplished in twenty minutes. 
The navigation of the river is closed Tor only about 
two months in the year by ice. 

There are various important industries in differ- 
ent parts ot the town that give employment to 
large numbers of its population, and they are rep- 
resented to be in a prosperous condition. Nearly 



one-half of the population, it has been estimated 
do business in the city. Its streets are in good or- 
der, and the same may be said of its public build- 
ings and other property, and the health of the 
town is as good if not superior to that of any other 
in the neighborhood of Boston." 

The following statistics exhibit the number of 
its population, dwelling houses, legal voters, and 
other details, as also its financial condition : 

Inhabitants, 12,000; dwelling houses, May 1, 
1868,1830; ratable polls, 2918; legal voters, 2100; 
churches, 13; schoolhouses of the larger class, 7; 
schoolhouses of the smaller class, 3 ; scholars, 
2000; acres of land, 4532%. 

Valuation for 1868— 

Real estate, $9,291,200 00: personal, $6,035,100 00. 

Town debt, $147,700; cash on hand Feb. 1,1869, 
and due from State and for taxes, $111,092 41; 
actual debt, $36,607,59. 

Value of town property, $237,182 26. 

Comparative statistics are given, showing the 
original area of uplands in Boston to have been 
690 acres ; present area 5370 acres ; area of New 
York, 14,502; Philadelphia, 82,560; London, 74,070. 
The area of Dorchester is 4542 acres, which, with 
that of Boston, would make 9912. The increase of 
population in Boston from 1855 to 1865 was 19 83- 
100 per cent.; of Dorchester 28%. 

The subject of centralization of wealth and pop- 
ulation is treatea upon, and in view of the tacts, 
which cannot be controverted, it is argued to be 
the duty to accept the actual existing conditions, 
and provide ty seasonable legislation for its natu- 
ral, necessary and healthful expansion and distri- 
bution over a wider area into the beautiful suburbs 
which nature has so lavishly furnished for the 
purpose. 

On the subject of drainage and harbor improve- 
ments, considerable attention is given Dy the ' 
Commissioners. They refer to the report of the 
Back Hay Commissioners to the City Council, 
City Document No. 81, 1863, in which to remedy 
the difficulty ot deposits at the mouth of Charles 
river, it i3 suggested tha,t Stony Brook be inter- 
cepted at or near Washington street, in Roxbury, 
and by a tunnel and sewer through Roxbury, the 
discharge of the brook be made into Dorchester 
Bay. The Governor, in his recent inaugural ad- 
dress, is quoted in relation to the nlling up of the 
South Boston flats, and the Commissioners refer 
to a communication which they have obtained 
from the State Harbor Commissioners on the sub- 
ject of drainage. 

The question whether a part or the whole of 
Dorchester shall be annexed, is considered, with 
the reasons lor each. After discussing these mat- 
ters, tbey conclude, as follows : 

"On the ground, therefore, of the necessity for 
a part, and the desirableness of the whole of the 
territory for the present and prospective wants of 
the city, the highly favorable financial, industrial 
and sanitary condition of the town, and paying 
due respect to the opinion and wishes of its in- 
habitants, your Commissioners report it to be their 
unanimous judgment that the whole of the terri- 
tory should be annexed to the city of Boston with- 
out delay, and they respectfully recommend to the 
City Council that His Honor the Mayor be author- 
ized to petition the Legislature on their behalf for 
an act to that effect." 

The views of the Harbor Commissioners referred 
to are as follows : 

Upon the general question on the expediency ot 
enlarging the water front of the city, it would not 
be proper for this Board to express any opinion, as 
they have jurisdiction equally over the water front 
of Boston and Dorchester, and can take as effi- 
cient measures for the protection ot navigation 
and the preservation ot the harbor, whether the 
corporation limits are diminisbed or enlarged. 

In regard to the matter of drainage, the Com- 
missioners, desirous of furnishing such informa- 
tion as they could command, directed their en- 
gineer to examine into the subject of deflecting 
the drainage of Stony Brook from Charlps river to 
Dorchester bay. The result of his examination 
have been communicated to the Board as follows : 

The topography of the country of which Stony 
Brook is the natural drain does not admit of other 
relief tor its water shed except at points near the 
mouth of said brook, at its confluence with Muddy 
river. 

Between this general locality and the shores of 
Dorchester Bay the ground is low and level, and a 
drain or sewer carrying even a part of the flowage 



MARCH 



18 6 9. 



50 



of Stony Brook, at times of freshet, would have to 
be of large capacity aud through expensive ground 
to occupy for this purpose. The distance trom the 
nearest point of Stony Brook favorable for deflect- 
ing drainage to the present nearest shore of Dor- 
chester Bay is about two miles— 10,500 feet. The 
distance from the same point to Charles river is 
about one and a quarter miles— 6500 feet. 

The route most lavorable or practical for a drain 
or sewer, turning Stony Broook into Dorchester 
Bay, pass* s just tangent to the township line ot 
Dorchester, and is already within the limits of the 
City of Boston, near the head waters of South 
Bay, and would not therefore involve questions of 
municipal interest. 

The physical bearing of the drainage from Stony 
Brook is a questionable one. As a tributary to 
Charles Uiver it is of value. Its volume during 
a recent ireshet was 400 cubic feet per second. The 
deposit trom it as a sewer would be injurious, but 
its influences in comparison with the water vol- 
ume ot Charles liiver or with its mud deuosit are 
of small proportion. 

The report was laid on the table and ordered to 
be printed. It is signed by Charles K. Train, N. J. 
Bradlee and George A. Shaw, Commissioners. 

FIRE ANNIHILATORS. 

A communication was received from the North 
American and seventeen other insurance compa- 
nies, expressing approval of the course of the 
City Council in placing Are annihilators in po- 
lice stations and engine houses, upon which they 
remark, -'Believing from past observation that 
with them at hand, many small fires which have 
resulted in large conflagrations might have been 
extinguished." Read and ordered to be sent down. 

WATER RATES. 

A communication was submitted from the Co- 
chituate Water Board, relative to water rates to 
tenants in model lodging houses. The Board state 
that when the present rates were adopted, this 
class ot houses were tor the poorest families. The 
erection of a better class of houses for families in 
more favorable circumstances makes it necessary 
that there should be some change in the rates. 
They propose amendments to the ordinance, so 
that the rates for families may range trom $3, the 
present rates, to $20, and where each tenement has 
a water closet, the price shall be $5 in place of §3 
additional. Referred to the Committe on Water. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Alderman White, from the Committee on Li- 
censes, reported in favor of licenses to boys, as 
follows: one as a newsboy, and one eaoh as a boot- 
black, to sell shoe lacings and to sell confection- 
ery. Accepted. 

Alderman White also reported in favor of licen- 
ses to sundry persons, as victuallers, as a keeper 
of a billiard saloon and to sell second-hand arti- 
cles. Severally accepted. 

Also a license to John H. Selwyn, to give theat- 
rical exhibitions, to Daniel Hunt for a concert, 
and to the following-named persons for velocipede 
rinks : 

Allen & Shapleigh, Horticultural Hall; Levi B. 
Gay & Co, 339 Washington street; John W. 
Douglass, Arlington Hall ; John H. McGrady, 112 
and 111 Broad street; Norris Fines, 201 Causeway 
street; Kimball, Brothers & Co., 115 Court street; 
Harvey Crocker, Lombard's wharf; Mackay & 
Butler, 9-1 Tremont street 

The reports were severally accepted. 

Alderman James, from the special committee 
to nominate pound-keepers and cullers of hoops 
and staves, made a report, recommending the ap - 
pointment of the following named persons : 

CaUers of Hoops and Staves — Lewis Beck, Ben- 
jamin Abbott. 

Pound- Keepers and Field Drivers — Wm. D. Cook, 
S. E. Partridge, Henry Morse, Thomas M. Cotton, 
Maurice B. Kowe, Samuel Mcintosh, Edwaid F. 
Mecuen, E. T. Hitchcock, Matthew K. Clark, J. M. 
Sweet, Wm. D. Getchell. 

The report was accepted and the persons named 
were appointed. 

The following appointments were also made : 

Inspector of Lime — Andrew Abbott. 

Alderman Fairbanks, from the Committee on 
Sewers, reported leave to witndraw on the peti- 
tion ot Nathan S. Maine, for an abatement of an 
assessment tor a sewer on Putnam street, and no 
action necessary on the petition of M. Coloj . Sev- 
erally accepted. 



An order directing the Superintendent of Sewers 
to construct a sewer in Tremont street, from Com- 
mon to Warrenton street, was read twice and 
passed. 

Alderman Fairbanks, from the committee to 
nominate candidates lor Weighers and Inspectors 
of Lighters and other Vessels, made a report, 
which was accepted, and an election took place as 
lollows: 

Whole number ot votes 12 

Necessary to a choice 7 

Edwara Hatch, Inspector-in-Chief 12 

John Kenny 12 

Abijah K. T'ewksbury 

Charles C. Davis 8 

Daniel Mahoney 4 

Win. B. Maloney 3 

Messrs. Hatch, Kenny, Tewksbury, and Davis 
were declared to be elected, the last named iu 
place of Mahoney, nominated by the Committee. 

Alderman Bradlee, from the Committee on Ordi- 
nances, reported that the ordinance in addition to 
an ordinance m relation to the Overseers of the 
Poor, giving the Overseers the direction of the 
Charity Bureau building, ought to pass. Accepted 
and the ordinance was passed. 

Alderman Talbot from the Committee on Street, 
reported no action necessary on sundry notices of 
intention to build. Accepted. 

Alderman Talbot reported an order for the ap- 
portionment of the betterment assessed on Clem- 
ent Willis, for the widening of High street. 
Passed . 

NOMINATIONS OF FIRST ASSISTANT ASSESSOR. 

Alderman Van Nostrand, from the Committee 
to nominate First Assistant Assessors, made a re- 
port, as lollowi, which was accepted and ordered 
to be sent down, and Monday next, 4>£ o'clock, 
was assigned for the election: 

Elbridge E. Fletcher, Benjamin F. Palmer, Abel 
B. Munioe, George D. Kicker, Michael Carney, 
Theophilus Burr. John Brown, Clement Willis, 
Christopher A. Connor, Joseph L. Drew, Joseph 
F. Huntress, James Dennie, Edward F. Uobinson, 
James H. Tallon, Francis James. E. B. Spinney, 
L. Foster Morse, Joseph W. Dudley, Charles A. 
Davis. 

ADDITIONAL APPROPRIATIONS FOR THE CITY 
HOSPITAL. 

Alderman Baldwin, from the Joint Committee 
on the City Hospital to whom was referred the 
request of the Board of Trustees for an additional 
appropriation of $5000. to meet the ordinary ex- 
penses of the hospital during the remainder of the 
financial year, made a report in which the Com- 
mittee say the necessity lor the additional appro- 
priation is set forth in the communication of tbe 
President of the Board, which is appended in 
print. 

Referred to tbe Committee on Finance. 

ADDITIONAL, APPROPRIATION FOR THE HEALTH 
DEPARTMENT. 

Alderman White, from the Committee on Health, 
submitted a report that there will be required an 
additional appropriation of $14,000, to meet the 
wants of the Health Department lor the present 
financial year. 

The excess of expenditures over amount appro- 
priated has been caused as follows : 

Ordered by Board of Aldermen, for which no 
estimate was made in t le annual appropriations : 

For Drinking Fountains $4,000 00 

Dredging Charles river at River street. . . 2,025 00 

Paving House Offal Yard 1,500 00 

And by excess of amount required to pay 

laborers employed by the Department, 

and for collecting ashes in East Boston. G.475 00 

Total amount required $14,000 00 

Referred to the Committee on Finance. 

FREE CONCERTS. 

Alderman Fairbanks, from the Joint Special 
Committee on the subject of Free Concerts, made 
a report that the appropriation which they were 
authorized to expend is exhausted, and that for 
the purpose of continuing the concerts for a few 
weeks longer they respectfully request an addi- 
tional appropriation of $1000. 

From the appropriation of $2500 made in De- 
cember, the expenses of eleven concerts have 
been defrayed, making the average expense of 
each about $225. The anticipations of the public- 
spirited citizens who first called the attention of 



51 



BOAED OF ALDERMEN 



tbe City Council to the subject of giving these en- 
tertainments, have been most fully realized. On 
every evening tbe hall has been filled, and fre- 
quently it has been necessary to close the enhan- 
ces a considerable time before the entertainment 
commenced. The audiences have been in every 
instance orderly and decorous, and the character 
of the music furnished, both vocal and instrument- 
al, has given general satisfaction. 

These iree concerts have been an experiment in 
this country, and the complete success which has 
attended tbem will, we believe, have a tendency to 
introduce a class of cheap entertainments for the 
laboring people, which will have a healthful aud 
refining influence. In conclusion they recom- 
mend the passage of the following order : 

Ordered, That the sum of $1000 be added to the 
appropriation heretofore made for tree concerts, 
said sum to be charged to the appropriation tor 
incidentals. 

Head twice and passed. 

NEW GRAMMAR SCHOOLHOUSE. 

Alderman White, from the Joint Standing Com- 
mittee on Public Instruction, to whom was referred 
the request of the School Committee for a new 
grammar schoolhouse in the Lyman district, made 
a report, as follows : 

The present grammar schoolhouse in the dis- 
trict was erected in 1840, on land given to the city 
by the East Boston Company. The building cost 
less than $14,000, and contains only six regular 
schoolrooms, one of which is used for all the pur- 
poses of a wardroom for Ward One. In the an- 
nual report of the School Committee for 1864, it is 
stated that this building has long been complained 
of as inadequate in its accommodation, being anti- 
quated in style, with two halls for exhibition pur- 
poses, badly located with regard to its proximity 
to other public buildiugs, and with insufficient 
access to light and air. 

The average attendance of grammar school pu- 
pils in this district appears from the last returns 
to be 478 — forming ten classes. Of this number, 
213 pupils, comprising four classes, are accommo- 
dated in other buildings, namely : one class of fif- 
ty-six in the engine house on Paris street, and 
three classes in the primary school house on 
Webster street, in the Adams district. Those 
who" attend the school on Webster street are oblig- 
ed to walk a long distance from their homes, and 
cross a steam railroad track four times a day. 

In 1867 this city purchased a lot of land on the 
corner of Paris and Decatur streets, containing 
26,250 square feet, for the purpose ot having erect- 
ed thereon a new building which should contain 
accommodations for all the grammar scholars in 
the Lyman district. As the increase in the aver- 
age attendance of grammar scholars in this dis- 
trict has been very slight during the past five 
years (401 in 1861 against 478 in 1869), the commit- 
tee are of the opinion that a building containing 
twelve rooms and an exhibition hall will be large 
enough to accommodate the maximum number of 
pupils. The old building on Meridian street, can 
be used for primary schools and ward meetings. 

The committee recommended the passage of the 
following order : 

Ordered, That the Committee on Public Build- 
ings berequested to procure and submit to the 
City Council plans and proposals for erecting a 



Grammar School building on the lot of land owned 
by the city_ on the corner of Paris and Decatur 
streets ; said building to be two stories in height, 
with a mansard roof, each story to contain accom- 
modations for six classes, and the roof stoiy to 
contain an exhibition hall; the plans to be ap- 
proved by the Committee on Public Instruction; 
and the expense ot procuring the same to be 
charged to the appropriation for Grammar Schools. 

Keierred to Committee on Pubiic Buildings. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on Print- 
ing, to whom was referred the order directing the 
City Messenger to furnish to each member of the 
City Council one copy of Cushing's Law and Prac- 
tice of Legislative Assemblies, made a report that 
the expense of furnishing a sufficient number of 
copies to supply each member of the City Council 
would amount to $337 50. They recommended the 
passage of the order in a new draft as follows : 

Ordered, That the Committee on Printing be 
authorized to purchase a sufficient number of cop- 
ies of Cushing's Law and Practice of Legislative 
Assemblies to supply the members of the City 
Council, the expense thereof not to exceed $337 50, 
and to be charged to the appropriation tor inci- 
dental expenses. 

Bead twice and passed. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on Streets, 
reported an order giving notice to quit to the pro- 
prietors of Uowe's Wharf, the proprietors of other 
wbarves, and to various individuals on the line of 
the proposed Atlantic avenue, also to the several 
other persons interested as owners, proprietors, 
tenants, occupants, or otherwise in said lands, to 
remove all obstructions on or before the 15th of 
May next, ersuing. 

The order was passed. 

ORDERS PASSED. 

On motion of Alderman James, 

Ordered, That the Board adopt and establish the 
revised grades of South Cedar street and South 
Cedar place, as shown on a plan made by the City 
Surveyor, dated Feb. 26, 1869, and deposited in the 
office of said City Solicitor. 

On motion of Alderman White, 

Resolved, That in the opinion of this Board, it is 
inexpedient to grant any licences, under the 26th 
section of the ordinances in relation to streets, 
for persons to stand in the streets for the sale of 
any articles, or for the transaction of any business 
therein. 

Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor be re- 
quested to petition the General Court, now in 
session, in behalf of the Board of Health of the 
city of Boston, for the use and control of Kainsford 
Island for health purposes. 

On motion of Alderman White, an order was 
passed for the abatement of a nuisance at No. 12 
Salem street. 

ORDERS OF NOTICE. 

Orders of notice were adopted, as follows: ' 

On the proposed widening of West street, north- 
easterly side. Hearing Monday, March 15, 4 P. M. 

On the proposed widening of Boylston street, 
Hearing Monday, March 15, 4 P. M. 

On the proposed widening of High street, corner 
ot Federal street. Hearing Monday, March 15, 4 
P.M. 

Adjourned. 



COMMON COUNCIL 



52 



CTY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 

MARCH 4, 1869. 



The regular weekly meeting; of the Common 
Council was held at 7% o'clock this evening, Win. 
G. Harris, the President, in the chair. 

PAPERS FROM THE BOARD OF ALDEEMKN. 

The petition of the Manufacturers' Exchange, 
that the city would indicate the terms and condi- 
tions upon which they may enjoy their franchise, 
was referred to the Committee on Streets with 
such as the Common Council may join. 

The communication from the North American 
and other insurance companies, in iavor of fire 
extinguishers being placed in public buildings, 
was ordered to be placed on file. 

Subsequently, on motion of Mr. Jacobs of Ward 
Five, the vote was reconsidered, aDd it was re- 
ferred to the Committee on Fire Department of 
the Common Council, with such as the Board of 
Aldermen may join. 

The request of the Water Board for modification 
of water rates for model lodging houses, was refer- 
red to the Committee on Water in concurrence. 

The communication of the Committee on Health 
for an additional appropriation of $14,000 to meet 
the wants of the Health Department for the re- 
mainder of the financial year ; also the report on 
the request of the Trustees of the City Hospital 
for an additional appropriation of $5,000 to meet 
the expense 8 of the Hospital for the remainder of 
the financial year, were severally referred to tbe 
Committee on Finance. 

The certificates of the appointments of Inspect- 
or ot Lime, and of the appointment of Cullers of 
Hoops and Staves, Field Drivers and round Keep- 
ers, were severally concurred in. 

The order to add $1000 to the appropriation here- 
tofore made for tree concerts was read once. 

Mr. Crowley of Ward Seven moved a suspension 
of the rules, to allow the passage of the order at 
tbe present time. 

Mr. Ingalls of Ward Twelve inquired how many 
concerts had been given, how many it was pro- 
posed to give, and how late in the season it was 
proposed to keep the matter up. 

Mr. Kich of Ward Fourteen, of the Committee, 
replied that it was desirable to extend the con- 
certs to about the 1st April. Four more concerts 
would be given, and possibly five, for there was a 
small balance on hand. The concerts had given 
the greatest satisfaction to all who had heard 
them. It would be recollected that they were 
given at the request of many of the largest tax- 
payers of the city, and the experiment was con- 
sidered a very satislactory one." 

The motion for the suspension of the rules was 
carried, and the order was read a second time and 
passed. 

The report and order authorizing the purchase 
of Cushing's Law and Practice of Legislative As- 
semblies was read once. 

An ordinance in addition to an ordinance in re- 
lation to the Overseers of the Poor was read twice 
and passed. 

The reference to Committee on Public Buildings 
of a report and order authorizing plans and pro- 
posals to be obtained for erecting a Grammar 
School building on the city lot corner of Paris and 
Decatur streets, was concurred in. 

WEIGHERS AND INSPECTORS OF LIGHTERS. 

The report of the committee to nominate candi- 
dates for Weighers and Inspectors of Lighters, 
was accepted, and the Council proceeded do an 
election. 



Messrs. Flynn of Ward Seven, Wilkins of Ward 
Nine, and Poor ot Ward Eleven, were appointed a 
committee to receive, sort and count the votes. 
The committee reported as follows : 

Whole number of votes 50 

Necessary to a choice 26 

Edward Hatch, inspector in chiel 43 

Win.B. Maloney, " " 2 

John Kenney 33 

Abijah ft.Tewksbury 24 

Chas. C. Davis 27 

Daniel Mahoney 20 

Win. B. Maloney 22 

Wm. L. Battis 26 

Messrs. Hatch, Kenney and Davis were declared 
to be elected in concurrence, and Mr. Battis in 
non-concurrence. 

Tbe report of the committee nominating First 
Assistant Assessors was considered. 

Mr. Bich of Ward Fourteen moved that the com- 
mittee be discharged from the further considera- 
tion of the subject, and that a new committee be 
appointed to report this or a revised list for the 
action of the Council. The committee appeared 
not to be composed as usual, and their report did 
not give general satisfaction. Heretofore the 
committee from the Council had been composed of 
one member from each ward, with the whole Board 
of Aldermen joiued. 

Mr. Gray of Ward Twelve remarked that there 
was no other way for the nomination of Assessors 
except by the Committee on the Assessors' De- 
partment. That mode was fixed by city ordinance. 

The Chair confirmed the views last stated, and 
ruled that the motion to nominate by a special 
committee could not be entertained. The report 
was accepted. 

SALARY BILL. 

The Salary bill was taken up as unfinished busi- 
ness. 

Mr. Wadsworth of Ward Four moved to strike 
out from the t-nd of the section relating to the 
Mayor's salary the provision adopted by the 
Board of Aldermen, allowing him the use of a 
horse and vehicle. 

Mr. Wadsworth gave as reasons that if such a 
horse was provided as would be fitting for the 
Mayor, he would cost $500 ; one of Goddard's bug- 
gies would cose $600 ; and with the horse keeping 
and wear and tear the expense could not be less 
than $1700 for the first year. The hav,k hire which 
might be required would not cost more than $300, 
and this would make a sav ing of about $1500. 

Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteen thought the amend- 
ment adopted by the Board of Aldermen was one 
eminently fitted to be made, and required by the 
dignity of the office. Several other officers were 
furnished with vehicles at the expense of the city, 
and when it is considered that the time 01 the 
Mayor is fully taken up by the duties of the office, 
it would be small business to require him to go 
about the city in cars and omnibuses. 

The gentleman had gone into the matter as one 
of cost alone for this year, when it would be a mat- 
ter of permanence, and the expense subsequently 
would not be so great. But such a consideration 
ought not to enter mto the matter, which should 
be to provide a proper conveyance tor the head of 
a great city, who should not be compelled to look 
after its interests in any sort of conveyance which 
might fall to his lot. 

Mr. Ingalls of Wa-d Twelve thought the argu- 
ments of the gentleman with regard to dignity 
were against the object advocated by him. The 
furnishine of a carriage for the Mayor will be put- 
ting bim on a par with the heads ot Departments. 
Instead of having him drive bis carriage round 
when it is necessary to go about the city, he be- 
lieved it would be better to hire a carriage for 
him. This course would be much more dignified. 
The expense could not be less than $1000 a year. 

Mr. Wadsworth further remarked that while the 
duties ot the Mayor were mainly in-doors, those 
of the heads of departments required their con- 
stant visits to all portions of the city in the super- 
vision of the work ot their several departments. 

Mr. Keith replied tuat the Mayor also was 
obliged to visit various portions of the city in tbe 
discharge ot his duties, made much more onerous 
by tbe extension ot the city limits, and it was de- 
sirable that lie should frequently go about to see 



53 



COMMON COUNCIL 



that the duties of other officers wsre properly per- 
formed. 

Mr. Nelson of "Ward Nine thought there was 
much force in what the gentleman from Ward 
Twelve and the gentleman from the Highlands 
had said. To meet their views, he moved to strike 
out the amendment and appropriate $1000 for the 
carriage-hire. 

Mr. Judson of Ward Fourteen opposed the 
last amendment, and hoped the amendment as 
passed by the Board of Aldermen would not be 
struck out. 

Mr. Waasworth doubted the propriety of the 
last amendment, and the right to make such an 
appropriation under the city charter. 

Mr. Nelson modified his amendment by provid- 
ing for an allowance of §500 for carriage hire, to 
be charged to incidental expenses. 

Mr. Pickering of Ward Fourteen wanted to 
know, if it was against che city charter to vote 
$1000, how $500 could be voted. II any sum could 
be voted it seemed to him it would be well enough 
to have it a respectable sum. 

Mr. Keith further opposed both of the amend- 
ments, and advocated the proposition as adopted 
by the Board of Aldermen. 

Mr. Rich of Ward Fourteen raised the inquiry 
whether the provision of the Board of Aldermen 
was not in conflict with the city charter, and in the 
nature of an emolument? 

Mr. Keith was of the opinion that it clearly was 
not. 

Mr. Ingalls was of opinion that the providing of 
a horse and vehicle was an emolument. They 
might be used for any other than official purposes, 
and that would be in the nature of an emolument. 
It should be provided in the amendment that he 
shall be allowed the use of a horse and carriage 
while travelling about the city on official business. 

Mr. Denny of Ward Ten looked upon this as 
penny-wise and pound-foolish legislation. The 
Mayor had been in the habit in the past to require 
carriage hire, and would be in the future. 

Mr. Nelson withdrew his amendment. 

Mr. Wadsworth did not think it necessary to 
make any change from the usual practice. Ike 
Mayor had been accustomed to call lor a carriage 
when necessary, and he would continue to do so. 

The motion to strike out was lost, 7 to 30. 

The consideration of the several orders and sec- 
tions was continued. 

Mr. Kich of Ward Fourteen moved to strike out 
$5000 as the salary of the City Treasurei , and make 
it $4500, as originally reported. Lost. 

Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteen made an inquiry rel- 
ative to payments outside of the office of the City 
Solicitor, in examining titles. He had noticed in 
looking over the Auditor's report that payments 
were made for outside expenses, and it had occur- 
red to him that with the assistance in the office of 
the Solicitor, the business of examining titles 
ought to be done by persons in the office. 

Mr. Flanders of Ward Five, of the committee, 
said he could give no information on the subject. 

On reaching the salary of City Physician, Mr. 
Ingalls of Ward Twelve said that in looking over 
the report, he found that, while as a general thing 
salaries had been increased, the salary of this offi- 
cer had been reduced. He could not understand 
why there should be such a difference in policy. 

Mr. Flanders said the office was a very desirable 
one for young men just entering upon practice, as 
the duties were not onerous, and took but little of 
the physician's time. The present incumbent 
went to the j°.il every Sunday, whether his ser- 
vices were required or not, but not often to other 
institutions. 

Mr. Ingalls said if it was desirable to have aman 
of ability and science in the office, it was not good 
policy to cut down the salary. He moved to strike 
out $1500 and Insert $2000. 

Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteen said there was no 
doubt that the City Physician was aman ot abili- 
ty. There had been much strife for the office, and 
it was thought a desirable one by young men. He 
wished to take this opportunity to set himself 
rio-ht in the matter, and as it was known that he 
had been favorable to the present incumbent, and 
had spoken of his competitor as ur.fit for the office, 
he would say as openly that he had done injus- 
tice to him and regretted it. He had learned 
from those who were connected with him in the 
profession that he was a promising young man, 
and was much respected. 



Mr. Ingalls said, if salaries were to be cut down 
hecause there was competion for office, there 
would be a lively time in the Citv Hall. There 
were many persons who would like to get office, 
and judging from the great number who were 
anxious to be elected Assistant Assessors, he 
should think that the places might he filled on this 
ground at fifty cents a day. 

Mr. Wadsworth stated that it had been said 
there were considerable perquisites attached to 
the office. The City Physician is obliged to furnish 
vaccine matter to all physicians m the city, and al- 
though he may make charges to persons away to 
whom it may be sent, many of them get it for 
nothing. 

Mr. Jenks of Ward Three inquired if it was any 
portion of the duty of the City Physician to attend 
upon the poor. 

Mr. Waasworth replied that he believed it was 
his duty to attend to all the poor who called at his 
office. 

In reply to a further inquiry whether the poor 
who were able were not required to pay for vac- 
cination, Mr. Wadsworth sai:) he did not sounder- 
stand it. Besides the duties of his office the City 
Physician is called upon to decide in cases of con- 
tagious diseases, and when the cholera was appre- 
hended a few years since, be wrote a great deal 
and was consulted much on the subiect. 

The motion to amend was carried. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward Seven moved to amend the 
salary of the Superintendent of Fire Alarms by 
allowing him the use of ahorse and vehicle. 

Mr. Ingalls of Ward Twelve wished to know if 
the vehicle would not answer for him and the 
Mayor too? 

Mr. Wadsworth of Ward Four stated that the 
duties of* the Superintendent were mainly in hi« 
office, and he could not see what he wanted a horse 
and vehicle for, unless it was for the purpose of 
riding up and down from the cupola. 

The amendment was lost. 

On motion of Mr. Gray of Ward Twelve, the 
salary of the Superintendent of Sewers was fixed 
at $2500, as reported by the committee. 

On motion of Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteen, the 
salary of Superintendent of Faneuil Hall Market 
was fixed at $2000, as originally reported. 

On motion of Mr. Dinsmore of Ward Two, the 
salary of the Deputy Superintendent of Faneuil 
Hall Harket was raised to $1500. 

Mr. Ingalls of Ward Twelve made an inquiry 
whether any one knew what the board of the Su- 
perintendent of the Boston Lunatic Hospital cost. 
No reply being made, he moved that the further 
consideration of the bill be passed over, that he 
might obtain information. Lost. 

Mr. Jenks of Ward Three moved to raise the pay 
of Lieutenants of Police from $3 50 to $3 75 per 
day, and of Sergeants of Police from $3 25 to $3 50 
per day. Cairted, by a vole of 28 to 7. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward Seven moved to raise the 
pay of detectives from $3 50 to $3 75 per day. 

Mr. Ingalls of fVard Twelve opposed the amend- 
ment, stating that there are a large number of men 
who are applicants for the office of policemen. 

Mr. Jenks said the officers were obliged to dress 
well, their duties were never ended, and they were 
always liable to have their heads broken. 

The amendment was opposed by Mr. Ingalls, ad- 
vocated by Mr. Judson of Ward Fourteen, and 
carried. 

Mr. Jenks moved to make the pay of day and 
night officers of the Police Department $1200 per 
annum. 

Mr. Denny of Ward Ten wished to know if the 
pay ot policemen was not as large or higher than 
in other cities. 

Mr. Jenks replied that the police officers of Cam- 
bridge and Cuarlestown were paid the same as 
were now paid in this city, while their expenses ot 
living were not so great. 

Mr. Denny further opposed the amendment, be- 
lieving the pay of policemen was as high as those 
of men in other employments and higher than 
elsewhere, as was shown by a report previously 
made to the City Council. 

Mr. Wells of Ward Three did not believe it 
would avail much to raise the pay of these offi- 
cers in the Council, for it would be non-concurred 
in by the other Board. If the members were 
really desirous of doing justice in the matter, let 
them begin in the Department of Superintendent 
of Health and work up on the pay of those who 
were the poorest paid in the employ of the city. 



MARCH 



18 6 9. 



54 



Mr. Gray of Ward Twelve moved to amend by 
giving an increase corresponding with the increase 
of other police officers, and make the rate $3 25 
per day. Lost. 

The motion to make the pay of policemen $1200 
per annum was carried, by a vote of JO yeas to 14 
nays, as follows: 

Yeas— Bond, A. F. Cole, M. J. Cole, Conant, Da- 
vis, Dinsmore, Dohei ty, Flynn, Hall, Hopkins, Ja- 
cobs, Jenks, Johnston, Judson, Keaney, Kings- 
bury, Lucas, Malone, Nelson, Noyes, Pearson, 
Pote, Kich, Kyan, Talbot, Tucker, Vannevar, 
Wells, Wilkins, Young. 

Nays— Braman, Lenny, Frost, Gray, Ingalls, 
Keith, Learnard, Pickering, Poor, Richards, Kog- 
ers, Snow, Wadsworth, Woods. 

Mr. Jacobs of Ward Five moved to increase the 
pay of officers of the City Prison to $3 75 per day. 
Lost. 

The aforesaid orders were severally passed as 
amended. 

On motion of Mr. Keith the further considera- 
tion of the Salary bill was postponed to the next 
meeting. 

COMMUNICATION FKOM THE MAYOE. 

The President read the following communica- 
tion from the Mayor: 

Boston, March 4, 18C9. 

To the City Council of the City of Boston: 

Considerable embarrassments constantly arise in 
the Boston Highlands, in the erection of wooden 
buildings, in consequence of restrictions which 
now exist by law, confining that portion of the 
city, in the same manner as the peninsula part, to 
the erection of such wooden buildings only as do 
not exceed sixteen feet in height. 

I therefore respectiully ask permission to peti- 
tion in your behalf the General Court, now in ses- 
sion, tor such power as may be necessary to enable 
the City Council to authorize the erection of wood- 
en buildings in the Boston Highlands, upon such 
terms and conditions, and subject to such limita- 
tions and restrictions, as you may deem expedient. 

Nathaniel B. Shurtleff, Mayor. 

Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteen offered an order in 
accordance with the provisions of the communi- 
cation oi the Mayor, requesting him to petition 
the General Council for such power as may be 
necessary to enable the City Council to authorize 
the erection of wooden buildings in the Highlands 
on such terms and conditions, and subject to such 
limitations ani restrictions, as they may deem ex- 
pedient. 

Mr. Ingalls stated that a bill had been sent to 
the Judiciary Committee for the very purpose de- 
sired. 

Mr. Kich of Ward Fourteen said he had been in- 
formed by the gentleman who introduced the bill 
in question t .at it was desirable this petition 
should be presented to the Legislature. 

The order was adopted. 

petitions presentfd and referred. 

National Webster Bank, to be paid for lost cou- 
pon of city stock. Keferred to Committee on Fi- 
nance. 

James Sturgis and others, for improvements in 
square at Dale and Bninbridge streets. Ordered 
to be sent M\y. 

H. A. Phillips, for compensation for services of 
her husband. Keferred to Committee on Claims. 

Calvin F. Ellis, tor compensation for injuries. 
Referred to Committee on Claims. 

John Nevans and others, to be relieved from an 
assessment tor a sewer. Ordered to be sent up. 

Mr. Lucas of Ward Seven, from the Committee 
on Fire Alarms, submitted City Document No. 30, 
containing a request for an additional appropria- 
tion of $1000 to meet the ordinary expenses ol the 
Fire Alarm Department during the remainder of 
the financial year. Keferred to Committee on 
Finance. 

reports of committees. 

Mr. Ingalls of Ward Twelve, from the Joint 
Standing Committee on Ordinances, to whom was 
referred the ordiuance to amend the ordinance iti 
relation to streets (the removal of snow aoi ice), 



with a proposed amendment to limit the provi- 
sions of the ordinance, made a report that in their 
opinion it would be inexpedient to adopt the pro- 
posed amendment. Accepted. 

The question recurring on the amendments pro- 
posed uy Mr. Keith at a former meeting of the 
Council, they were rejected. 

Mr. Jenks of Ward Three moved a postpone- 
ment of the consideration of the ordinance for one 
week. 

Mr. Rich of Ward Fourteen stated that the 
ordinance was introduced several weeks since to 
remedy a defective ordinance, and that by delay 
mu'jh oi the benefits to be derived from it had 
been lost. He hoped it would be passed tonight. 

Mr. Jenks believed it to be unjust, and he wished 
delay that ne might ascertain the provisions of 
similar ^ rdiaances in other cities. 

M r. Keith said he had misapprehended the ques- 
tion, supposing it was on the acceptance ot the re- 
port. He repeated many of the objections urged 
by him on former occasions, against the passage 
ot this ordinance It would be impossible tor 
many persons in the outer wards to remove snow 
and ice as provided by this ordinance, and if ever 
the question should be raised the ordinance will 
be pronounced unconstitutional because unrea- 
sonable, and impossible to be enforced. It was 
proposed soon to annex Dorchester, and this was 
the inducement offered to the people, to require 
them in one hour to remove the snow and ice trom 
long distances around some farms. It would be 
used by malicious persons to satisfy petty spite 
against their neighbors. 

Mr. Ingalls said it would be impossible to frame 
any ordinance which would not apparently work 
unequally in some cases. He did not believe that 
any person would bring a malicious prosecution in 
such a case. 

Mr. Keith, in his practice as a prosecuting officer, 
had known of such cases, and there were always 
those who wished the Commonwealth to tight their 
battles for them. 

Mr. Rich ot Ward Fourteen stated that as a 
matter of practice, the courts did not entertain 
complaints for violation of the city ordinances, 
unless they were made through policemen. 

Mr. Keith replied that it they did not, they vio- 
lated their duties. They were bound to receive 
complaints made by any one. 

The previous question was moved and sustained, 
and a postponement was carried. 

Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteen, from the Joint Stand- 
ing Committee on Public Buildings, to whom 
was referred the request of the Scliool Committee, 
that the City Council would "restore the use of gas 
to the usher's room m the Brimmer School build- 
ing," and introduce gas into the lower rooms of 
the Mayhew School house, made a report as fol- 
lows: 

Gas fixtures were introduced in the room now 
used by the usher in the Brimmer Schoolhouse, 
when it was used for award room ; when the ward 
room was removed, the supply was cut off. 

The rooms in the Brimmer and Mayhew School 
buildings are so situated with regard to the admis- 
sion of daylight that there can be no possible oc- 
casion lor rhe use of gaslight during the school 
hours, and the Committee were not aware of any 
necessity on the part of teachers or pupils lor the 
use ol artificial light after scnool haul's. In their 
opinion, therefore, it would be inexpedient to 
comply with the request of the School Committee. 

The repoit was accepted. 

The same committee, to whom was referred the 
petition ot Samuel D. Bates, for the renewal of 
his lease of a part of the building, on Court ■street, 
known as the "Bridge estate," reported that in 
their opinion it is inexpedient to renew said lease. 
Accepted. 

Mr. Richards of Ward Fight, from the Commit- 
tee on Streets of the Common Council, to whom 
was referred the request ot the Committee on Lay- 
ing out and Widening Streets for an additional 
appropriation of $72,000, for the completion of 
grading, paving, &c, of Oliver street, made a re- 
port that the order ought to pass. 

The Committee state that the expenses of grad- 
ing Oliver street had been largely increased by the 
tailing in of the banks Oil the sides ot the cut; this 
street had been cut through under a special act of 
the Legislature. It was desirable that the work of 
removal ot the earth and the grading should pro- 



55 



COMMON COUNCIL. 



ceed without delay. It was a matter of doubt 
whether the additional expense could be assessed 
upon the abuttors, or whether they could be 
charged with interest on the temporary loan. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward Seven moved that the order 
be laid on the table, expressing doubts whether 
there were members enough present to pass it. 
The motion to lay on the table was carried. 

Mr. Nelson of Ward Nine raised the question as 
to the position of the snow and ice ordinance and 
the amendments of Mr. Keith. 

The President stated that the amendments of 
Mr. Keith had been rejected before the motion 
was made for postponement by the gentleman 
from Ward Three. 



Mr. Nelson ot Ward Nine, from the Joint Spe- 
cial Committee to nominate candidates to fill va- 
cancies in the Board of Overseers of the Poor, 
made a report recommending the election of the 
foHowing-nanaed persons to serve for three years : 

James L. Little, George Fabyan, Francis E. Par- 
ker, Thomas Blasland. 

The report was accepted and sent up. 

Mr. Denny of Ward Ten was excused from 
serving on the Committee on the Music Festival, 
and Mr. Pickering of Ward Fourteen was appointed 
in his place. 

Adjourned. 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



56 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 
MARCH 8, 1869. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Board of Al- 
dermen was held tnis afternoon at lour o'clock, 
Mayor Shurtleff presiding. 

JURORS DRAWN. 

Four Grand Jurors and four Petit Jurors were 
drawn for the United States District Court. 

APPOINTMENTS MADE AND CONFIRMED. 

Sergeant Richardson A. Tewksbury, as Lieuten- 
ant of Police; William S. Kendall as Sergeant of 
Police. 

William B. Bayley, Surveyor of Marble, Free- 
stone and Soapstone. 

Michael Farnham, Special Police Officer, with- 
out pay, for duty at the Old State House. 

, PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

J. A. & A. Smith, Malachi Clark, Benjamin 
Jones, Michael Gormley and G. H. Moseley, for 
leave to sprinkle certain streets in the city. Sev- 
erally referred to the Committee on Health. 

Milton Austin and others, lor a sewer in Rock- 
ville place. 

John IS evan and others, for abatement of assess- 
ment for a drain in rear of Winslow street. 

Severally referred to Committee on Sewers. 

Catharine Sullivan, to be compensated for in- 
juries resulting in the death of her son, James P. 
Sullivan, occasioned by a fall on the Oliver street 
bridge. 

Charles McCarthy, to be compensated for per- 
sonal injuries caused by an improper location of a 
wire of the Fire Alarm apparatus. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Claims . 

B. S. Rotch and others, for the acceptance of the 
passage way between Commonwealth avenue and 
Marlborough street. 

M. D. Ross and others, for a change in the direc- 
tion of Atlantic avenue. 

Nathan Matthews for the discontinuance of the 
street south of the Providence and Boston & Al- 
bany Railroads. 

Severally referred to Committee on Streets. 

Kimball Brothers & Co. and others, for the ex- 
tension of the name of Tremont street through 
Sudbury street to Haymarket square. Referred 
to Committee on Paving. 

Michael Quigley and others, that lamps be placed 
and lighted in Russell court (Highland District). 
Referred to Committee on Lamps. 

Henry W. Crombie, for leave to run a line of 
coaches from South Boston, over Dover street 
bridge to Eastern depots ; also another line from 
the Highlands to the Chelsea Ferry. Referred to 
Committee on Licenses. 

Mary Harrigan, for abatement of assessment for 
sidewalk on Cottage street. 

Wm. A. Crafts and others, that Heath street 
may be put in order and improved for public 
travel. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Paving. 

Alonzo Bond for leave to give concerts at Boyls- 
ton Hall on Monday evenings. Referred to Com- 
mittee on Licenses. 

C. E. King & Co. and others, that the name of 
Avon place be changed to Avon street. Relerred 
to Committee on Paving. 

Noah Lincoln and others, that a steamer or hose 
carriage may be located on Commercial street. 
Referred to Committee on the Fire Department. 

NOTICES OF INTENTIONS TO BUILD. 

Owen Nawn, Harrison avenue; W.B.Wadman, 
corner of Washington street and Union park; 



Grover & Baker Sewing Machine Co., corner of 
Washington andWaltham streets; JohnCronin, 
corner of B and Federal streets; N. J. Bradlee, 
corner of Washington and Harvard streets ; N. H. 
Emmons and others, trustees, No. 9 Temple 
place ; J. B. Meserve, 135 Endicott street ; 
J. F. Haynes & Co., Decatur, near Paris street: 
Jones Hickie, Fifth, between A and B streets; 
M. W. Parker, Fifth, between 1 and K streets; 
H. A. Doe, corner of D and Eighth streets: Hill 
& Wright, 145 to 157 Summer street; G. W. 
Meserve, 810 Washington street; C. II. Pitman, 
238 Third street; D. H.Jacobs, 8 Province street; 
J. M. Adams, 7 Albany street; G. W. Pope, corner 
of Chauncy street and Avon place; Albert Brown, 
corner of Green and Pitts stre.ts; Peterson & 
Goodwin, 77 Joy street. 

COMMUNICATION RELATING TO TRUANT CHIL- 
DREN. 

The following communication was reid and re- 
ferred to the Committee on Police : 

To the Honorable Mayor and Board of Aldermen : 

The undersigned, members of the Society of Saint 
Vincent de Paul, respectfully present the lollow- 
ing for your consideration, and they trust the sug- 
gestion contained therein will meet the approval 
of your honorable body. 

In the discharge of the duty imposed by the rules 
of our society, to visit the poor, so that we may 
learn their actual condition, our attention has 
been called to the large number of children who 
are habitual absentees from school,— thus permit- 
ted to grow up in ignorance, viciousness and often 
in crime. Some have parents whose own irregular 
lives render them indifferent to the well-being of 
their children, but there are many others com- 
pelled to remain from school to gather food or 
fuel, or to do whatever else they can to help their 
distressed families. 

Satisfied that no greater service can be done 
those poor children than to withdraw them irom 
this vagabond life which leads so many to the 
criminal's dock, we have resolved to make it our 
special care. To this end. therefore, aid shall be 
generously given to those who agree to seud then- 
children regularly to school. 

In the accomplishment of this work, your honor- 
able body can render much assistance by not con- 
fining tbe selection of truant officers to a class of 
men who, however well suited they may be in 
other respects, are deficient in a very necessary 
qualification, namely, a knowledge of the people 
with whom they principally have to deal. 

Our purpose is not to censure or to find fault un- 
necessarily, but to point out where a change is 
greatly needed, and would be, if made, heneficial 
to tbe entire community. That the truant law 
fails to produce any good result, is undeniable. 
H. K. Oliver (State official) unhesitatingly declar- 
ed it at a Convention of School Superintendents 
held recently in Boston. Nor can it be otherwise, 
as it is at present enforced. All that is done by 
the officers (and it is all that seems to be required 
of them ) is to look after soma special case when 
so directed by a teacher. 

Yet there are scores of children who may be 
seen daily about the streets during school hours, 
who scarcely ever enter a school, and of whom the 
teachers have no record whatever. These are the 
neglected ones, who need to be cared for. With 
this object in view, and not in a spirit of selfish- 
ness, we ask for the appointment of some intelli- 
gent, sensible men, from among our people, men 
who best know our poor, who understand tbe diffi- 
culties with which they have to contend, and who, 
acting in concert with our charitable organiza- 
tions, would labor earnestly and conscientiously 
to secure the real purpose of the law— the preven- 
tion of truancy rather than the punishment of de- 
linquents. 

Should there be any difficulty in making the de- 
sired change, we would respectfully urge that one 
at .least be appointed for those localities where 
those people chiefly reside. This would enable 
your honorable body to judge of the propriety and 
wisdom ot complying with our request. 

Geo. E. Murphy, 
President of St. Peter and St. Paul's Conference. 
John W. McDonald 
President of St. James, Conference. 



57 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



HEARINGS ON ORDERS OF NOTICE. 

The hearing on the order ot notice relative to 
assessment of betterments for the opening of 
Avon place was taken up by assignment. 

Samuel E. Sewall appeared on behalf of Hon. 
Eichard Fletcher, who, he said, had always op- 
posed the opening of the street on account of dis- 
turbing the quiet of his residence there. A deed 
■was presented of the premises dated 1826, on which 
Mr. Sewall argued that the place was laid out for 
the sole use of the owners ot property therein, 
who also had the use of an open lot at the foot ot 
the place. 

Judge Fletcher hoped to have spent the remain- 
der of his days there, an^ had been much annoyed 
by the noise m the opening of the place, greatly 
to the injury of his health. Bather than to be as- 
sessed lor betterments, he contended that Judge 
Fletcher should be entitled to damages. 

A. S. Wheeler said he appeared with F. W. Lin- 
coln, Jr., for the Second Church, but as the matter 
"would probably be recommitted, they would ap- 
pear before the committee. 
The report was recommitted. 
The older of notice on the proposed widening of 
West Cedar street by taking land on the easterly 
side, between Uevere and Phillips streets, was 
taken up. No person appearing in relation there- 
to, the report was recommitted. 

The order of notice on the proposed widening of 
liennet avenue was taken up. 

A remonstrance against the proposed widening 
was presented from the heirs of Joshua Bennett 
and others, settiner forth that there was no exi- 
gency calling: for the widening of the avenue; that 
there was little travel through it, except by school 
children ; and that it would injure rather than in- 
crease the value of property, except of those indi- 
viduals who were urging the carrying out of the 
project. 

Wm. W. Warren appeared lor the remonstrants. 
He said he had desired to hear an argument in fa- 
vor of the measure before saying anything against 
it. In signing the remonstrance he wished it to 
be understood that he would not oppose any meas- 
ure designed for the public goocf, and when he 
signed this, was told that the proposed widening 
was for a private purpose only. The petition in 
favor of it was signed about a year ago. One of 
the petitioners purchased an estate on the avenue 
some mouths since and had covered it with a 
building, which he did not doubt required more 
air. 

In his view there was a much greater call for 
the widening of other streets at the Worth End 
than there was for this widening. It appeared 
that there were but tour owners of property on 
the avenue who were in favor of it,and he doubted 
whether there was any necessity for the widening. 
Several estates would be ruined by the amount 
of land which would be ^aken, and he doubted 
whether the abuttors would be benefited in the 
slightest degree. One of the original petitioners 
is now represented in the ownership of property by 
one who is a remonstrant. 

John 0. Tucker appeared for petitioners, and on 
reading the petition stated that it included all of 
the abuttors on one side, and most of those on the 
other side. The petition of the School Committee 
of the district and of teachers in the Hancock 
School was also read. There were only three abut- 
tors who opposed the widening, and there was 
one owner Who was in favor of the measure, but 
who would sign neither the petition nor remon- 
strance. 

The buildings to be cut off are of little value, 
and on account of the narrowness of the avenue — 
but six feet in width— children are inconvenienced 
in going through the place, and the abuttors are 
required to carry the snow to either extremity. 
Teams cannot come in for the removal of the swill 
and ashes, and a communication was read from 
the Health Department, favoring the widening on 
that account. 

James Alden, owner of an estate on the avenue, 
made representations of the inconveniences at- 
tending the narrowness of the place, in getting in 
wood and coal and the removal of snow. At the 
present time, there wa9 an unoccupied space for 
nearly half tbe length of the avenue, and before a 
creat while the inconveniences must be greater 
in occupying this space, much to the obstruction 
of light and air, and to the detriment of the health 
of the people living therein. 
The report and papers were recommitted. 



auditor's monthly exhibit. 
The Monthly Exhibit of the Auditor was pre- 
sented, giving an exhibit of the general and special 
appropriations for the present financial year of 
1868-69, as shown in the books in his office, March 
1, 18U9, including the March draft, being eleven 
months' payment of the financial year, exhibiting 
the original appropriations, the amount expended, 
and tne balances of each unexpended at that date. 
The recapitulation is as lollows: 

Appropriations, Ex- Unex- 

Uevenues, etc. pended. pended. 

General... $7,138,356 73 $5,938,094 49 $1,200,262 24 
Special. . . . 5,683,747 08 2,925,193 74 2,758,553 34 

$12,822,103 81 $8,863,288 23 $3,958,815,58 
COMMUNICATION FROM THE BOARD OF ENGINEERS. 

A communication was received from the Board 
of Engineers of the Fire Department, in reply to 
nn inquiry of the Board of Aldermen, relative to 
the erection of wooden buildings. The Board 
state that the recommendations of the Board of 
Aldermen have been lully complied with by the 
sending of a printed circular to all the builders, 
contractors and architects of the city. They 
further state that they have no reason to believe 
that the requirements of the law have been vio- 
lated since such action was taken. The communi- 
cation was ordered to be printed. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

The following orders were read a second time 
and passed. 

Ordered, That the City Treasurer be and he is 
hereby directed to abate the bill of $36 ajrainst 
Sarah H. Brown for edgestoncs furnished by the 
C'ty in front of ber estate, No. 59 Mount Pleasant 
avenue, she being unable to pay said bill. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of streets be 
directed to construct a sewer in Tremont street, 
from Common to Warrenton streets. 

COMMON COUNCIL PAPERS. 

The several petitions of H. A. Phillips and of 
Calvin F. Ellis, lor compensation for services and 
injuries, were referred in concurrence. 

The notice of appointment of Henry W. Picker- 
ing on the Musical Festival Committee, in place of 
George P. Denny, resigned, was placed on filq. 

The election of one Weigher and Inspector of 
Lighters was taken up, and ballo tings took place 
as follows : 

1st ballot. 2d do.. 

Whole number of votes 12 12 

Necessary to a choice. 7 7 

Abijah K. Tewksbury 4 5 

W.B.Maloney 6 6 

Win, L. Battis.. 2 1 

Alderman Pratt said it was the opinion of per- 
sons competent to judge, that Mr. Maloney was the 
proper person to be elected to the office. 

Alderman Seaver said it should be stated in be- 
half of Mr. Tewksbury that he was tne proper man 
to be elected, an honest and straightforward man 
with nine years' experience in the office. 

The third ballot resulted in a choice as follows: 

Whole number of votes 12 

Necessary lor a choice 7 

Wm. B. Maloney 7 

A. 1{. Tewksbury 5 

Mr. Maloney was chosen in non-concurrence 
with the Common Council, which made choice ot 
Mr, Battis. 

The request of Committee on Fire Alarms for au 
additional appropriation of $1000 was referred to 
the Committee on Finance, in concurrence. 

Aldermen Kichards, Seaver and Hawes, the 
Committee on the Fire Department, were joined 
to the committee to whom was reterred the com- 
munication of officers of insurance offices, com- 
mending the action placing lire extinguishers in 
station houses and other places. 

The report of Committee on Nomination of Over- 
seers of the Poor was accepted in concurrence, and, 
an election resulted as follows: 

Whole number of votes 12 

Necessary for a choice 7 

James L. Little ., 12 

Francis E. Parker 12 

Thos. Blasland 12 

George Fabyan 12 

The. report inexpedient to renew lease of Samuel 
D. Bates in the Bridge estate ; also report inexpe- 
dient to introduce gas into certain rooms in the 



MARCH 8, 1869. 



58 



Brimmer and Mayhew Schoolhouses were accept- 
ed in concurrence. 

TUe order requesting the Mayor to petition the 
Legislature respecting the erection of wooden 
buildings in the Highlands was adopted, in con- 
currence. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES; 

Alderman Richards, from the Committee on the 
Fire Department, reported a license for the sale of 
petroleum, to Smith & Merrill, Liberty square. 
AcceuteL 

Alderman James, from the Committee on Pav- 
ing, on the petition of Wm. McGuire for leave to 
box around his estate at the corner of Harrison 
avenue and Rochester street, reported that leave 
be granted. Accepted-. 

Alderman White, from the Committee on Li- 
censes, reported in favor of the application of Co. 
D, llrst regiment, M. V. M., to give an entertain- 
ment at Institute Hall, March 9th. Accepted. 

Alderman White also reported in tavor of licens- 
ing lour newsboys and one boy as a bootblack; 
also in favor ol sundry persons as innholders, 
victuallers, wagon licenses, billiard saloons, and for 
sale of second-liand articles. Severally accepted. 

Also leave to withdraw, which was accepted, on 
petition of Emanuel Axon, tor a fruit stand at No. 
59 Court street. 

"Velocipede rink licenses were granted, as fol- 
lows : 

X. Q. Loud, 84 Springfield street; D. F. Comee, 
761 Washington street; W. T. Find all, 121 Haver- 
hill street; Flack & Delano, 1557 Washington 
street; Jonn H. Whicher, 3 Bowdoin square; J. H. 
Grant 9 Harrison avenue; B. S. Wright, 83 Court 
street; W. P. Sargent & Co., 47 Hanover street; E, 
L. Eastman, 65 Hanover street; Geo. P. Cole, cor- 
ner of Broadway and B streets. 

Alderman Hawes, from the Committee on Steam. 
Engines, on the petition of Samuel West, for leave 
to erect and use a steam engine at No. 7 Avon 
place, reported that leave be granted. Accepted. 

AlrJerman Talbot, from Committee on Streets, 
reported no action necessary on sundry notices of 
intentions to build. Accepted. 

Alderman James, from the Committee on Pub- 
lic Lands, to whom was recommitted the petition 
of Jarvis Williams, for extension of time for 
building upon a lot ot land on Harrison avenue, 
recommended the passage of the accompanying 
order : 

Ordered, That the time for erecting and com- 
pleting a build'iig upon a lot of land on Harrison 
avenue, sold by the City of Boston to Edward 
Gallagher, August 30, 1867, and which was to be 
improved with buildings erected thereon within 
two years from said date, be extended to August 
30, 1871, upon condition that the present owner 
thereof pays to the Superintendent of Public 
Lands the sum of $300 within ten days ironi the 
passage of this order. 

Read twice and passed, and sent down for con- 
currence. 

Alderman James, from the same Committee, 
made a report as follows: 

The Committee respectfully represent that ap- 
plications have been made for the purchase of the 
land on Brookline and Pembroke streets known as 
a reserved lot, the same having been set apart by 
the city in 1819 lor school purposes. Since then 
other lots have been taken for the erec- 
tion of schoolhouses on Waltham, Spring- 
field and Northampton streets, and last year a lot 
was purchased on Newton and Pembroke streets 
for the Normal Scnool, being nearly opposite to 
the above lot. Believing that the city does not re- 
quire said land, the Committee recommend the 
passage of the following order. 

Ordered, That the land on Brookline and Pem- 
broke streets, known as a reserved lot, he and the 
same is hereby placed in charge of the Committee 
on Public Lands. 

Read twice and passed and sent down lor con- 
currence. 

Alderman Hawes, from the Joint Standing Com- 
mittee on Water, who were directed to consider 
tue expediency ot placing the Lowry hydrants in 
the Church street district, reported that after a 
careful examination of the whole subject, they are 
of the opinion that the efficiency of the Fire De- 
partment would be greatly promoted by the intro- 
duction of the Lowry hydrant, and they therefore 
recommend the passage of the accompanying or- 
dei : 



Ordered, That the Cochituate Water Board be 
requested to introduce the Lowry hydrants where 
the water pipes are laid on the Church street dis- 
trict. 

Read twice and passed, and sent down. 

Alderman Richards, from the Joint Committee 
on Public Buildings, to whom was referred the or- 
der assigning for the use of the Cochituate Water 
Board so much of the land purchased for the po- 
lice station in Ward Fifteen as is not required for 
the use of the same, made a report, in which they 
state that the lot contains 3421 square feet of land. 
As this land is to be used entirely for the Water 
Department, it is proper that the amount paid for 
it should be included in the expenses for furnish- 
ing water.and should be paid lor as apart of the cost 
of the Water Works. They therefore report the 
order in a new draft as follows : 

Ordered, That so much of the land belonging to 
the city as was purchased for the use of ths Police 
Station now being erected in Washington street, 
in Ward Fifteen, as is not required for the use of 
the same, be and the same is hereby assigned for 
the use oi the Cochituate Water Board, said Board 
to pay the cost of said land, and the amount re- 
ceived therefor to be credited to the appropriation 
for Police Station, Ward Fifteen. 

Read twice and passed. 

EXTENSION OF BROADWAY. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Ccmmittee on Streets, 
reported a resolve and orders for the extension of 
Broadway from Federal street to Albany street, in 
accordance with plans heretofore proposed, speci- 
fying the land to be taken, and concluding as fol- 
lows: 

And whereas, due notice has been given of the 
intention of this Board to take the said parcels ot 
land for the purpose aforesaid, as appears by the 
return hereunto annexed, it is therefore 

Ordered, That the parcels of land before de- 
scribed be, and the same hereby are, taken and 
laid out as a public street or way of the said city, 
according to plans of the said street made by 
Thomas W. Davis, City Surveyor, numbered re- 
spectively 1 and 2, each bearing date May 1, 1867, 
and deposited in the office of the said City Sur- 
veyor. And this Board doth adjudge, that the ex- 
pense of extending the said Broadway as afore- 
said, will amount to the sum of two hundred and 
twenty-six thousand five hundred eighty-six and 
seventeen one-hundredths dollars; and that the 
damages to the estates, parts of which are taken 
as aforesaid, are the sums set against them re- 
spectively on the schedule hereto annexed. 

Ordered, That the Treasurer be, and he hereby 
is, authorized to borrow, under the direction of 
the Committee on Finance, the sum of five hun- 
dred and filty thousand dollars, the same to be ap- 
propriated lor the extension of Broadway, from 
Federal street to Albany street, including all nec- 
essary bridges and structures. 

The orders were read once. 

ORDERS ADOPTED. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of the Market 
be authorized to employ, subject to the approval 
of the Mayor, one deputy to assist him in the dis- 
charge of the duties of his office. 

Ordered, That there be paid to John Colligan 
the sum of $450, in full compensation for all dam- 
ages done to his estate in the rear of 554 Shawmut 
avenue, by the raising of the grade of said ave- 
nue, upon his proving his title to said estate to the 
satisfaction ot the City Solicitor, and upon his 
giving to the city an acquittance and discharge 
for all damage, costs and expenses, on account of 
the raising of said grade ; the same to be charged 
to the appropriation for raising and grading Shaw- 
mut avenue and Ruggles street. 

On motion of Alderman Talbot, an order was 
adopted, for the widening of Devonshire street, 
giving notice to quit to George Howe, Frederick 
O. Prince, Wm. W. Tucker, Seth E. Sprague and 
others, on or before 18th May next. 

Aldermen White, James and Richards, with such 
as the Common Council may join, were appointed 
a committee to nominate candidates for Consult- 
ing Physicians. 

ORDERS OF NOTICE. 

Alderman Hawes, from the Committee on Steam 
Engines, reported an order of notice, which was 
adopted, for a hearing on petition of Badger & 
Batchelder, for leave to use a steam engine in their 
building at the corner of Cambridge and Charles 
streets. Hearing Monday, March 29, 4 P. M. 



59 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



Also a hearing March 29, 4 P. M., on petition of 
the American Steam Guage Company, for leave to 
place an engine in their factory, No. 5 Lmclall 
street. 

On motion of Alderman Talbot, an order of no- 
tice on the proposed widening of High and Sum- 
mer streets, at their junction. Hearing Monday, 
March 22, 4 P. M. 

Also, on the proposed widening ot Congress 
street, at the corner of Milk street. Hearing Mon- 
day, March 22, 4P.M. 

GRADING OF STREETS ON FORT HILL. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on 
Streets, reported an order of notice, which was 
adopted, to all parties interested in the several 
streets on Fort Hill, for a hearing on Monday, 
March 22, at 4 P. M., that the Board proposes ac- 
tion as follows : 

The widening and grading of Hamilton street on 
the westerly side thereof ; that Sturgis street 
should he laid outabout fittyieetin width, between 
Pearl and Broad streets, and graded ; that Hart- 
ford street should be laid out about fifty feet in 
width between Sturgis place and Broad street, and 
graded ; that High street, between Pearl and Oli- 
ver streets, should be widened on the southeast- 
erly side, and graded; that Washington square 
should be graded; that Washington avenue, be- 
tween Washington square and Purchase street 
should be widened and graded; that Purchase 
street, between Pearl and Broad streets, should be 
widened and graded; that Cushing street should 
be laid out about fifty feet in width, between 
Washinzton square and Broad street; that Wen- 
dall street should be graded, all in accordance 
with plans in the office of the City Surveyor. 

ELECTION OF FIRST ASSISTANT ASSESSORS. 

The election of First Assistant Assessors was 
taken up. 

Alderman Van Nostrand stated that the name of 
Charles E. Grant was left off the list because he 
had removed from the city, and he was authorized 



to withdraw the name of Charles A. Davis in favor 
of 'ieorge F. Williams. 
The result of the election was as follows : 

Whole number of votes 12 

Necessary to a choice 7 

Elbridge E. Fletcher 12 

Benjamin F. Palmer 12 

Abel B. Munroe 10 

George H. Kicker 10 

Michael Carney 8 

John Brown 12 

George F. Williams 10 

Christopher A. Connor 12 

Joseph L. Drew 11 

Joseph fc\ Huntress 9 

James Dennie 12 

Edward F. Kobinson 12 

James H. Tallon 11 

Francis James 12 

E. B. Spinney .11 

Otis Rich 12 

Artemas K. Holden 12 

Geo. A. Shaw 9 

L. Foster Morse 10 

Jos. W. Dudley 7 

Chas. E. Grant o 

Clement Willis 4 

Theophilus Burr, Wm. H. Mcintosh, Charles A. 
Davis, and Edward F. Hunting, one each. 

Mr. Dudley , although having votes sufficient for 
a choice, was declared to be not elected, nineteen 
other persons constituting the full number of the 
Board having more votes than Mr. Dudley. 

ANNEXATION OF DORCHESTER. 

On motion of Alderman Van Nostrand the re- 

Sort of the Commissioners on the Annexation of 
lorcbester, City Document No. 28, was taken from 
the table, and referred to a joint special commit- 
tee. 

Aldermen Van Nostrand and Bradlee were ap- 
pointed on the part of the Board of Aldermen. 
Adjourned to Tuesday, iy 2 o'clock P. M. 



COMMON COUNCIL 



60 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 

MARCH 11, 1869. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Common 
Council was ueld this evening at iy 2 o'clock, Wm. 
G. Harris, the President, in the chair. 

a motion was ruaae that the reading of the 
records be dispensed with. 

Mr. Snow of Ward Eleven hoped that this kind 
of larce would not be continued ac every meeting. 
He moved an amenument to the rules to obviate 
the necessity of such a motion every evening. 

Mr. lngalis of Ward Twelve raised a question of 
order, tliat the motion was not germane to the 
question under consideration. 

The Chair ruled that the point of order was well 
taken. 

The leading of the records was dispensed with, 
in accordance with the usual practice. 

PAPERS FROM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

Petitions from the Board of Aldermen were re- 
ferred in concurrence. 

The Auditor's Monthly Exhibit, March 4, City 
Doc. No. 2'J, was ordered to be placed on tile. 

Messrs. luchaids ot Ward Eight, Young of Ward 
One, and Jacobs of Ward Eive, were joined to the 
Committee on the report of Commissioners on the 
annexation of Dorchester. 

The election of an Assistant Weigher and In- 
spector ot lighters and other vessels was taken up, 
and Messrs. Denny of Ward Ten, Snow of Ward 
Eleven, and Hobbs of Ward Fifteen, were op- 
pointed a committee to receive, sore and count the 
votes. The committee reported as follows : 

Whole number of votes 51 

Necessary to achoice 26 

Abijah K. Tewksbury 23 

Wm. B. Maloney 21 

Wm. L. Battis 7 

Mr. Hall of Ward One said he wished to say a 
word in favor of the nominee of the Committee, 
Mr. Tewksbury. That gentleman had several 
years' experience in the uthce, was in tact the pro- 
jector ot it, and was in every way competent to ful- 
fil its duties. 

The second ballot resulted as follows: 

Whole number of votes 55 

Necessary to a choice 28 

Abijah K. Tewksbury 34 

William B. Maloney 21 

Mr. Tewksbury was declared to be elected, in 
non-concurrence. 

Tne following orders were passed in concur- 
rence : 

Order placing a reserved lot on Brookline and 
Pembroke streets in charge of Committee on Pub- 
lic Lands. 

Keport and order extending time to August 30, 
1871, lor Jarvis Williams to build on a lot on Har- 
rison avenue, purchased by him of the city. 

The report and order assigning to Water Board 
so much ot the land in Ward Fifteen, purchased 
for the Police Station now being elected, as is not 
required for said Station, were read once. 

The report and order requesting the Water 
Board to introduce the Lowry hydrants when the 
water pipes are laid in the Church street district 
being under consideration, Mr. Wadsworth of 
Ward Four moved to amend by providing that the 
expense thereof shall be charged to the appropri- 
ation for raising the Church street territory, stat- 
in advocacy ot the motion that he couia see no 
reason w'ly the expense should be charged to the 
water department. The new pipes which were 
to be laid in that district were to be charged to the 
appropriation for the district, and there should be 
ho difference between the two. 

The amendment was adopted, and the order was 
read once. 



ELECTION OF OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

Messrs. Jacobs of Ward Five, Squires of Ward 
Eight and Emerson of Ward Six, were appointed 
a committee to receive, sort and count the votes. 
The committee reported as follows: 

Whole number of votes 54 

Necessary to a choice 28 

James L. Little 53 

Francis E. Parker 53 

Thos. Blasland 54 

George Fabyan 50 

Benjamin Lucas 3, E. W. James, John Dacey and 
Geo. P. Oarrow, one each. 

Messrs. Little, Parker, Blasland and Fabyan 
were declared to be elected in concurrence. 

Messrs. Batchelder of Ward Four, Gray of Ward 
Twelve, Davis of Ward Thirteen, Keany of Ward 
Two and Pote of Ward One were joined to the 
Committee to nominate Consulting Physicians. 

ELECTION OF FIRST ASSISTANT ASSESSORS. 

Mr. Wilkins of Ward Nine moved that the 
Council proceed to the election of First Assistant 
Assessors. 

Mr. Hichards of Ward Eight moved that the cer- 
tificate or election be laid on the table, and that 
the subject be specially assigned to Thursday 
evening next, at eight o'clock. Lost, 26 to 28. 

The vote to proceed to an election was carried, 
by a vote ot 26 to 24. 

Mr. Hopkins ot W ard Ten said he was authorized 
to withdraw the name of E. F. Hunting. 

Mr. Keith ot Ward Fifteen wished to say a word 
on the subject. There were nineteen Assessors to 
be elected, which would give one lor each ward, 
and a surplus to be divided among the larger 
wards. In the election by the Board of Alder- 
men but one had been chosen irom Koxoury, while 
that section was justly entitled to three. 

Mr. Keith stated that Mr. Grant of Ward Four- 
teen was on the Board last year, and discharged 
his duties with mush acceptance. Mr. Dudley of 
Ward Fifteen, who was also a candidate, was 
Treasurer and Collector of Koxbury for many 
years, and was more popular in that section, and 
had a better acquaintance with the property and 
the people than any other person in nomination. 
These persons were eminently lit for the office, 
while no other persons out of that section could 
be as suitable for those wards. He hoped that in 
voting, members would remember these names 
and vote for them. It had been stated that Mr. 
Grant had removed irom that section. This was 
not true, for he was living where he had been for 
several years. 

Messrs. Wilkins of Ward Nine, Braman of Ward 
Six, and Batchelder ot Ward Four were appoiuted 
a committee to receive, sort and count the votes. 

Mr. Judsonof Ward Fourteen said he had no 
objection to Mr. Grant, but he wished to present 
the name of Wm. H. Mcintosh, as an exceedingly 
suitable person tor the office. 

Mr. Batchelder of Ward Four said it had been 
reported that Theophilus Burr had declined to be 
a candidate. This was not so, for Mr. Burr had 
Dever authorized asy one to withdraw his name. 

Mr. Wells of Ward Three said that instead of 
such a story being current it was on the other side, 
in which it had been circulated falsely that Arte- 
mus K. Holden was not a candidate. 

Mr. Batchelder replied that three Aldermen had 
told him that they were assured Mr. Burr was not 
a candidate. 

Mr. Kich of Ward Fourteen did not wish to have 
a candidate for Ward Fourteen named by a gentle- 
man not a resident of the ward. AH persons living 
in the ward were in favor of Mr. Mcintosh, livery 
ward in the city should be represented by one 
First Assistant Assessor; some of the wards havi 
three, elected by the other buatd, while others bad 
none at all. Our duty should be to elect one man 
for each ward, and therj would be letc four more 
for the larger wards. He had nothing to say 
against Mr. Grant, but Mr. Mcintosh had seen 
several years' service as an Assessor in Koxbury, 
and was a preferable candidate. 

Mr. Wadsworth of Ward Four said there were 
ten tickets before him, containing nineteen names 
on each, 190 in all, and be had had no time to look 
over them and pick out such as were the most 
suitable. He was in hopes that the election woulu 
be postponed, and if so, arrangements could be 
maue wnich would secure a much more satisfac- 
tory selection of candidates and more equally dis- 
tributed in the several wards. 



61 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



Mr. Flyrm of Ward Seven raised the question 
that the gentleman was out of order. 

The Chair ruled that the question of the candi- 
daces, but not of postponement, might be dis- 
cussed. 

Mr. lngalls of Wrrd Twelve stated that the 
Council liad ordered the election. 

Mr. Wilkins of Ward Nine moved a reconsidera- 
tion of the vote ordering an election. Carried, 27 
to 26. 

Mr. Wadsvvorth moved to postpone and assign 
the election to Thursday eveiug next, at 8J< o'clock. 
Mr. Crowley of Ward Seven moved to lay the 
motion on the table, and subsequently withdrew 
it, when the question recurred on tl.e motion to 
proceed to an election. 

Mr. Denny of Ward Ten spoke of the impor- 
tance ol the election, and of the necessity of ob- 
taining the best man lor the ottice. He knew hut 
few oi the candidates, and believed it would he bet- 
ter to postpone, when the mem Deis could inform 
themselves ana come prepared at the next meeting 
to make the best choice, ihe Southern District 
had out one Assessor elected !"y the other branch, 
and if he was a resident there he should not be sat- 
isiiedwith such a lesuk. 

Mr. Jenks ol Ward Three wished to inquire it 
the design was to call a caucus and settle the ques- 
tion of nominations as it had been in other cases. 
II so he would preier to go into an election at this 
time. 

Mr. Denny said he did not know anything about 
a caucus, aud, if there was, should not attend it, 
for he should be a thousand miles or more away at 
the next meeting of the Council. 

Mr. Jenks wished to know if caucuses had not 
been called in other cases? 

Mr. lngalls of Ward Twelve hoped the vote 
would be taken tonight, to get rid cl being pulled 
aDout here and there. Everybody has ha.i an op- 
portunity t"> ascertain who tne candidates are, and 
can vote as intelligently now as a week hence. 

The yeas and nays were ordered, and the motion 
to proceed to an election was carried by a vote 
of 30 to 25 as follows: 

Yeas— Bond, A. F. Cole, M. J. Cole, Conant. 
Crowley, Davis. Dinsmore, Doherty, Flanders, 
Flynn, Gray, Hall, lngalls, Jacobs, Jenks, Judson, 
Kenny, Keith, Kingsbury, Lucas, Malone, Mul- 
lone, Noyes, Pearson, Rogers, Ryan, Wells, Wil- 
kins, Woolley, Young. 

Nays — Batchelder, Belknap. Braman, Butler, 
Denny, Emersou, Frost, Gay, Goirg, Ilobbs, Hop- 
kins, Johnston, Leonard, .Nelson, Osborn, Picker- 
ing, Poor, Rich, Richards, Snow, Squires, Talbot, 
Tucker, Vannevar, Wadsworth. 

The committee to count the votes reported the 
result as follows : 

Whole number ot votes, 5G; Necessary to a 
choice, 29; Elbrid^e E. Fletcher, 49; Benjamin F. 
Palmer, 12 ; Abel B. Munroe, 42 ; George D. Ricker. 
44; Michael Carney, 35; John Brown, 42; Cris- 
topher A. Connor, 49; Joseph L. Drew, 40; 
Joseph F. Huntress, 43; James Dennie, 38; 
Edward F. Robinson, 43; James H. Tallou, 
27; Francis James, 50; E. B. Spinney, 41); 
L. Foster Morse, 36; George F. Williams, 46; Otis 
Rich, 37; Arteaias R. Holden,31; George A. Shaw, 
13; Clement Willis, 18, Joseph W. Dudley, 51; 
Theophilus Burr, 33; William H. Mcintosh, 20; 
Charles A. Davis, 9; Charles E. Grant. 23. 

George W. Bail, E. F. Hunting, Asa Messer, 
three each ; F. S. Carruth, Jerry Brigham, Col- 
man Cook, E. W. James, John Dacey ana N. H. 
Tucker, one each. 

All of the above who received the required vote, 
except Messrs. Dud.ey and Burr, were declared to 
be elected in concurrence, and these two in non- 
concurrence, Mr. J. H Fallon and Geo. A. Shaw, 
elected by the Board of Aldermen, failing to se- 
cure an election in the Council. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

The order authorizing the purchase of "Cush- 
ing's Law and Practice of Legislative Assemblies" 
was passed in concurrence. 

The Committee on Streets on the part of the 
Common Council was joined to the Committee of 
the Board of Aldermen on the petition of the Man- 
ufacturers' Exchange, in relation to the terms and 
conditions of their franchise. 

The order authorizing the Treasurer to borrow 
$72,000, to be added to the appropriation called 
the Oliver Street Temporary Loan, printed City 
Document No. 23, 18G9, was taken from the table, 
read a' second time, and passed, in concurrence. 



SALARY BILL. 

The Salary bill was taken up, the question being 
for action on the fifth and sixth orders. 

Mr. Tucker of Ward Six moved to make the sal- 
ary of the Chief Engineer of the Fire Department 
S3000. Carried. 

Section four beine: reached, 

Mr. Jenks of Ward Three presented petitions 
from J. C. Traver and others, members of the 
Fire Department, asking tor an increase of salary. 
Read once an! sent up. 

On motion of Mr. Jenks, sectioa four was 
amended by a vote ot 20 to 15, making the salaiy 
ot the foremen of the respective Hook and Lad- 
der companies and the foremen (of the hose) or 
Engine and Hose companies $325 per annum. 

Mr. Jenks moved also to amend section five, to 
provide that the salary ot the Assistant Foremen, 
Clerk, Rakemen and Axemen Stewards of Hook 
and Dadder companies numbered 1 and 4, hose- 
men of Engine and Hose companies, and members 
of the Hook and Ladder companies, shall be at the 
rate ot three hundred dollars each per annum. 

Carried by a vote of 23 to 18. 

Mr. Kingsbury of Ward Fitteen moved to amend 
section six, to mane tne salaries ot drivers of En- 
gine, Hose and Hook and Ladder companies $3 25 
per day. 

Mr. VV^ells of Ward Three moved to amend by 
providing in the same section that the salaries of 
enginemen shall be $3 75 per day, and of fire- 
men $3 50 per day. 

Mr. Denny of Ward Ten opposed the amend- 
ments as he did all of these amendments to the 
Salary bill, believing that the city paid to its em- 
ploye's a tair compensation, as much as was paid 
elsewhere, while there were many standing ready 
to take the places of these men at their present 
rate of compensation. The amendments of Mr. 
Wells were lost, and the yeas ar.d nays were or- 
dered on Mr. Kingsbury's amendment, which was 
rejected by a vote ot 20 to 26, as follows: 

Yeas— Bond, A. F. Cole, M. J. Cote, Conant, 
Crowley, Davis, Dinsmore, Doherty, Emerson, 
Flynn, Going, Jenks, Keany, Kingsbury, Lucas, 
Malone, Mullane, Nelson, Noyes, Pearson, Ryan, 
Squires, Talbot, Wells, YVoolley, Young. 

Nays— Batchelder, Braman, Denny, Frost, Gay, 
Gray, Hall, Hobbs, Hopkins, ingalls, Jacobs. 
Johnston, Judson, Keith, Learnard, Osbom, Pick- 
ering, Poor, Rich, Richards, Rogers, Snow, Tuck- 
er, vannevar, Wadsworth, Wilkins. 

Mr. Hopkins ol Ward Ten moved to amend sec- 
tion two ot the last order, relating to the salaries 
of the Assistant Assessors, by providing that the 
amount of serviceofthe Assistant Assessors shall 
be rendered in such manner as the Joint Commit- 
tee on the Assessors Department shall order. Al- 
so, by adding after "Board," in Section Three, the 
words "of Assessors and Assistant Assessors." 
Carried. 

The Salary bill, as amended, was passed, in con- 
currence. 

Mr. Jacobs of Ward Five moved to reconsider 
the vote on section six of the fifth order relating 
to salaries of enginemen and firemen. 

The Chair ruled that the adoption of the order 
must first be reconsidered. 

A motion to reconsider the order was lost. 

Mr. Noyes of Ward Five moved to amend section 
nine, page twelve, to increase the salary of the Su- 
perintendent of Hacks to $3 75 per day. 

The Chair ruled a? before that the adoption of 
the order must first bereconsidered. 

A question of order .was raised whether the mov- 
er had voted with the majority. 

Mr. Noyes said he had no recollection of having 
voted on the order. 

The question of reconsideration was not 
pressed. 

PAPERS FROM THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

A request of the School Committee for the res- 
ervation ot a lot of land on Berkeley street for 
school purposes, and for a provision in the appro- 
priation bills for the purchase of school books tor 
all the public schools, was referred to the Com- 
mittee on Public Instruction. 

PETITIONS. 

N. F. Bryant and others, Charles E. Wicgin and 
others, and A N. Libhey and others, that the city 
would purchase the property of tne East Boston 
Ferry Co. Referred to the Committee on Ferries. 



MARCH 11, 1869. 



6£ 



REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Mr. Wadsworth, from the Joint Special Com- 
mittee on the Church Street District, made a re- 
port, in which they state that the second section 
ot the act authorizing; the city of Boston to take 
the property included in the Church street district, 
provides that any person entitled to any estate in 
any part of the land so taken may, at any time 
within one year Irom the time when toe same shall 
be taken, lile a bill in equity in the Supreme Judi- 
cial Court, setting forth the taking ol the com- 
plainant's land, and the condition of the same 
in respect to its capacity for drainage, and wheth- 
er the complainant claims any and what damages 
against the city of Boston, or the Boston Water 
Power Company, or any other corporation or per- 
son, by reason of any and what wrongful act or 
omission, by their causinsr a diminution in the val 
ue oi his land at the time of said taking, and play- 
ing an assessment of damages against sujh par- 
ties. 

This taking was consummated on the 9th of 
May, 1808, and the Committee and the Commis- 
sioners chosen by the City Council bave oeen 
authorized to settle with tne former owners by 
paying lor the property taken, or reconveyingit to 
them. 

So far as the work ot raising the territoiyhas 
proceeded, the Committee have succeeded in mak- 
ing satistactory settlements with the former 
owners ; but on certain sections the work is not 
sufficiently advanced to afford any proper basis 
for an adjustment before the expiration of the 
time named in the act, and the former owners will 
consider it necessary, in order to protect their iu- 
teiests, to tile a bill in equity unless the time is 
extended. 

In order to remove any proper cause for litiga- 
tion on tne part of the former owners, the Com- 
mittee would respectfully recommend that the 
Mayor be authoiized to petition the Legislature 
lor an extension of the time to November 9tu — six 
months. They accordingly submit the following 
order: 

Ordered, Tbat His Honor the Mayor be re- 
quested to petition ihe General Court now in ses- 
sion for an extension ol the time to November 9, 
1869, within whicn any person entitled to any es- 
tate on the Church Street District, so called, may 
file a bill in equity, as described in tLe second 
section of chapter 308 of acts ot the year 1867. 

A motion to lay on the table and print was 
lost, when the order was read a second time and 
passed. 

Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteen, from the joint stand- 
ing committee on Public Buildings, who were di- 
rected to procure plans and estimates tor the 
erection oia building lor the Girls' High and Nor- 
mal School, submitted the following report: 

Plans and specifications lor a three-story build- 
ing, containing all the modern improvements, 
were submitted by Mr. George Bopes Jr., architect, 
and approved by the Committee on Public In- 
struction, January 21st, 18G9. 

From the estimates which they have received, 
your committee lind that it will cost $170,000 to 
erect the building in accordance with these plans, 
and they estimate that the furniture and heating 
apparatus will cost $20,000. As the latter will not 
be required for a year or more, they would rec- 
ommend that an appropriation of $170,000 be made 
for the erection of the building, and that the 
amount necessary to provide furniture and heat- 
iug apparatus be estimated in the appropriation 
for the next financial year. They therefore recom- 
mend the passage of the following orders: 

Ordered, That the Committee on Public Build- 
ings be authorized to erect a building on Newton 
street for a Girl's High and Normal Schoo;house, 
in accordance with the plans approved by the 
Committae on Public Instruction, the expense 
thereof not to exceed $170,000. 

Ordered, That the Treasurer, under the direc- 
tion of the Committee on Finance, be authorized 
to borrow the sum of $170,000, to be appropriated 
to the erection of a Girls' High and INoiinal 
Schoolhouse. 

The orders were read once. 

Mr. Osborn of Ward Six, from the Committee on 
Finance, to whom was reterred the petition of the 
National Webster Bank to be paid the amount of 
a lost coupon of city stock, recommended the pas- 
sage of the accompanying order: 

Ordered, That the City Treasuier be authorized 
to pay the National Webster Bant the amount of 



coupon No. 2814, of Boston Water Loan, lor $25> 
due October 1, 1868, payable in gold, which has 
been lost and not uaid, provided said bank give a 
bond satisfactory to the City Solicitor to save 
harmless and indemnity the city of Boston for 
making said payment. 

Bead once. 

The same Committee, to whom was referred the 
reports of the Committees on Health, City Hos- 
pital, Cemeteries, and Fire Alarms, severally ask- 
ing tor additional appropriations, reported the 
accompanying order, granting the appropriations 
asked tor; also giving authority to the Auditor of 
Accounts for making necessary transfers lor clos- 
ing the financial year: 

ordered, That the Auditor of Accounts be au- 
thorized to transfer from the reserved fund to 
the appropriation for Health Department $14,000; 
to that for City Hospital $5000 ; to that for Ceme- 
teries $1000; to that for Fire Alarms $1000; also to 
make such transfers ot appropriations as may be 
necessary in closing the business oi this financial 
year, which terminates April 30, 1869. 

Bead once. 

Mr. Lucas of Ward Seven, from the Committee 
on Fire Alarms, to whom was referred the petition 
ol C. K. Classen and others that an alarm bell be 
placed on the grain elevator recently erected on 
Chandler street, made a report that it appears 
from the statement ot the Superintendent 
that this district is covered by alarms from 
the church on Church street, which is 
only one thousand feet distant from the elevator, 
the church on Hollis street, eighteen hundred feet 
distant, the church on Castle street, fifteen hun- 
dred feet distant, and the Bice Schoolhouse, six- 
teen hundred feet distant. The Committee there- 
fore recommend that the petitioners have leave to 
withdraw. 

The report was accepted. 

Mr. Bichards ot Ward Eight, from the Committee 
on Streets, otthe Common Council, to whom were 
referred the resolve and order to lay out a new 
street forty feet in width between Harrison 
avenue and Albany street, two hundred feet 
irom, and parallel to East Dover street, submitted 
a report as follows : 

In 1867 this city purchased about 117,000 square 
feet of flats on East Dover street, between Harri- 
son avenue and Albany street, mainly for the pur- 
pose of affording a convenient place for the deposit 
of ashes and other refuse material collected by the 
Health Department. The flats are now mostly 
tilled to the grade of twelve feet above mean low 
water; and the proposed new street is the 
result of an agreement between the Committee 
on Public Lands, representing the city, and the 
owners of land adjoining the southerly side. The 
city is not called upon for any expenditure of 
money; and is required to furnish only half the 
land included in the street. The arrangement 
made by the Committee on Public Lands appears 
to be a judicious one, as the city's land can be sold 
for a handsome profit after the street is laid out. 

The resolve and order for the taking and laying 
out are a mere matter of form, to comply with the 
statutes in relation to laying out highwnys. The 
Committee therefore recommend their passage. 

The resolve and order were read a second time 
and passed. 

auditor's estimates. 

Mr. Osborn of Ward Six presented a report, as 
lollows: 

The Joint Special Committee of the City Coun- 
cil, to whom was referred the Auditorof Accounts' 
estimates for the financial year, commencing May 
1, 1869, and terminating April 30, 1870, having given 
the same a thorough examination and considera- 
tion, are unanimous in their opinion that the esti- 
mates of the Auditor ot Accounts should be adopt- 
ed to meet the wants of the city for the coming 
financial year, amounting in the total to $8,551,754. 

The amount required for carrying on the gov- 
ernment, as per estimates, less the income, is 
$7,067,304, to meet which the Auditor of Accounts 
is of the opinion that a gross tax of $7,279,324 will 
be required, as $212,020, the difference between the 
amount requisite for the appropriations, less the 
income, and that of the tax, is to meet the defi- 
ciencies in the payments into the Treasury within 
the financial year. 

Your Committee, concurring in the above opin- 
ion, would, therefore, recommend to the City 
Council the passage of the two orders annexed 



63 



COMMON COUNCIL. 



one making the appropriations and the other lay- 
ing a tax to meet the same. The orders are as fol- 
lows : 

It is hereby ordered by the City Council, That to 
defray the expenditures of the city of Boston and 
the county of Suffolk for the financial year which 
will commence with the first day of May, 1869, and 
end with the last day of April, 1870, the following 
sums of money he and the same are herehy re • 
spectively appropriated tor the objects and pur- 
poses as explained intheAuditor of Accounts' Esti- 
mates, and in the application of the various Com- 
mittees and Boards contained and printed in this 
document. 

And it is further ordered, That no money shall be 
expended, and no debts oe incurrPd for any object 
or purpose for which a specific appropriation is 
herein made, beyond the amount which is so spe- 
cifically appropriated; provided, however, that any 
sums of money which may be subscribed or con- 
tributed by individuals to promote the objects of 
any of the foregoing appropriations, and waich 
form no part or the estimated income of the city, 
shall be strictly applied, according to the inten- 
tion of the contributors, and shall be credited to 
such appropriations accordingly ; that is to say: 

For 

Advertisintr, $6000 ; Annuities, $1200 ; Armories, 

$18,000; Bells and Clocks, $2225; Boston Harbor, 
$9500; Biidge&,$ 18,000; Cemeteries, $14,010; Chest- 
nut Hill Driveway, $5000; City Debt, $577,000; City 
Hospital, $90,000; Comins Grammar Schoolhouse, 
$30,000; Common, $59,800; County ot Suffolk ,$200,- 
000; Engineer's Department, $12,000; Fire Alarm 
Department, $25,00f: Eire Department, $260,000; 
Grammar Schoolhouse, Ward Nine, $18,000; Gram- 
mar Schoolhouse, Ward Twelve, $20,000; Harbor 
Dredging, $3000; Health Department, $315,600; 
Interest and Premium, $986,000 ; Incidental Ex- 
penses, $100,000; Lamps, $303,600; Markets, $5000; 
Militia Bounty, $45,000 ; Mount Hope Cemetery, 
$15,000; Old Claims, $1500; Overseers of the Poor, 
$68,000; Paving, $000,000; Police, $575,000; Pub- 
lic Baths, $26,500; Public Buildings, $95,- 
000; Public Institutions — House ot Indus- 



try, $143,500; House of Correction, $90,000 
Lunatic Hospital, $76,000 ; Quarantine Department, 
$9000; Steamboat H. Morriso", $15,000; Pauper 
Expenses, $20,000 ; General Expenses at City Ol- 
fice, $7000 ; New Building for Pauper Girls, $lO,0C0 ; 
New Almshouse at Deer Island, $1000; New Farm 
House, $7500— $379,000; Public Lands, $12,000 
Public Library, $55,000 ; Printing and Stationery, 
$30,000: Keserved Fund, $300,0u0; Salaries, $222,- 
000; Schools and Schoolhouses, viz.: Higli and 
Grammar School Instructors, $515,600; Giammar 
Schools, Public Buildings, $100,000; Grammar 
Schools, School Committee, $44,000; Salaries Offi- 
cers School Committee, $18,700; Primary School 
Instructors, $223,500; Primary Schools, Public 
Buildings, $100,000; Primary Scliools, School Com- 
mittee, $9000. Salaries, Weights and Measures, 
$5915 ; Sewers and Drains, $75,000 ; State Tax, $904,- 
000 ; Surveyor's Department, $25,000; War Ex- 
penses, $5000; Water Works, $190,100; Water 
Works, Interest and Premium, $691,000; Widening 
Streets, $175,000. Total, $8,554,751. 

Ordered, That the sum ot seven millions two 
h"ndred and seventy-nine thousand three hun- 
dred and twenty-lour dollars be raised on the polls 
and estates taxable in this city, according to law, 
to pay the current expenses of the City ot Boston 
and the County of Suffolk, during the financial 
year whicli will commence with the first day of 
May, 1869, and end with the last day of April, 1870. 

Ihe orders relerred to were read once. 

OKDERS PASSED. 

On motion of Mr. Ingalls of Ward Twelve, that 
the Committee on Public Buildings be requested 
to consider and report on the subject ot ventilat- 
ing the chamber ot the Common Council, now the 
same can be done, and the probable cost of tr.e 
same. 

On motion of Mr. Snow ot Ward Eleven, that 
the Committee on Kules and Orders be directed to 
consider whether any changes are needed in re- 
gard to the reading of minutes of preceding meet- 
ings. 

Adjourned. 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



64 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 
MARCH 15, 1869. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Board of Al- 
dermen was held this afternoon at lour o'clock, 
Mayor Shurtleff presiding. 

APPOINTMENTS MADE AND REFERRED. 

James F. Goodwin as Constable. 

Byron M. Dulling and James Gilfether, special 
police officers, without pay, for duty at the Old 
Colony & Newport Railroad oepot. 

John 1*. Fisher, special police officer, without 
pay, tor duty at St. Stephen's church. 

JBenjrmir. Mapoon, G. W. Chase, Edwin Cass, N. 
B. Whitman, Squire Booth, Robert Bell, Charles 
H. Kendall, John Kenison and Benjamin F. Keed, 
reappointments, ior duty in the paving depart- 
ment. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

Thayer & Bates, for abatement of assessments 
for removal of nuisance on Dunlow street. 

John Kelley, tor leave to sprinkle certain streets 
in this city. 

Severally referred to Committee on Health. 

George H. Davis and others, for release of con- 
ditions in deed iiom the city, on land in rear of 
Newton street. Referred to Committee on Public 
Lands. 

TheopLilus Burr and others, that the Blossom 
street sewer be rebuilt lroin Fruit to Cambridge 
street. 

Heirs of Peter Renton and others, for abate- 
ment for sewer in Broadway. 

House of Angel Guardian, for abatement of as- 
sessment for a "sewer on "Vernon street. 

"Luther Farwell and others, for extension of the 
Sbawmut avenue sewer to Sterling street. 

Stephen Dow and others, for a sewer in High 
street, from Federal street to Summer street. 

Severally referred to Committee on Sewers. 

F. A. Blanc and others, that a lamp be placed in 
tre passageway leading from Temple place to 
Winter street. Referred to the Committee on 
Lamps. 

Hay ward P. Cushing and others, in aid of the 
petition of M. D. Rc5S and others, for a change in 
the direction of Atlantic avenue. 

W. A. Hej er and others, that Dartmouth street 
from Beaeoii street to Columbus avenue be accep- 
ted. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Streets. 

NOTICES OF INTENTION TO BUILD. 

John Cassens, Brooks street, between Chelsea 
and Bans streets ; Wm. L. Burt, Devonshire, Milk 
and Water streets; John Shaughnessey, Third, 
between C and D streets ; Mark Dowlinir, Third, 
between P and Q streets; Charles A. Fox, 3G 
Montgomery street; David H. Jacobs, 264 ana 266 
Washington street; C. & G. Barker, 110 and 112 
Hanover street; Hugh Flood, South Margin, 
near Gouch street; Benjamin Bobbins, 76 Lev- 
erett street; C. Tilden, Jr., Perrin, opposite 
Alaska street; Michael Keenan, 26 South 
Margin street; Richards & Bates, 156 Charles 
street; B. H. Flanders, 81 Friend street; S. A. 
Field, Tudor, between B and C streets ; Burrill & 
Whitney, Second, between E and F streets ; also 
on uove, between E and F streets ; A.L. Bailey, 
K, near Ninth street; W. A. Prescott, Battery 
street; James Sisson, corner ot Ninth and New 
Lark streets; Barnes & Barker, 93 Union street; 
Angus McQuarry, Trenton street, between Brooks 
and Reservoir streets; Christopher Lea, 16 Colony 
street; Morton & Chesley, Brookline street, be- 
tween Warren avenue and Tremont street; 
John M. Doane, Meridian street, between De- 



catur and Maverick streets; D. A. Perry, 
corner of National and Dorchester streets; 
Dexter Jack, Eutaw, between Marion and Brooks 
streets; R. Bishop, Swan street, between Dor- 
chester avenue and Foundry street; N. J. Brad- 
lee, corner Court square and Court avenue; John 
Gilbert, Warren street, corner of Moreland street; 
B. E. Hastings, 165 Tremont street; A. J. Hatha- 
way, Ruggles street, opposite Mechanics street. 
Severally referred to the Committee on Streets. 

HEARINGS ON ORDERS OF NOTICE. 

The hearing on order of notice on the proposed 
widening of West street, on its northeasterly side, 
was taken up. 

Remonstrances were presented from Patrick 
Grant and others, and F. Skinner & Co. and others, 
objecting to the widening for various reasons; that 
the subject of widening had lately been considered 
and settled ; one of the abuttors, under such an im- 
pression of its settlement had undertaken expen- 
sive improvements; that the public good does not 
require the proposed widening; and that large 
sums of money will be required for such widening 
without a corresponding benefit. 

Mr. J. B. Parker stated that the remonstrances 
set fortn the. reasons for objection to the further 
widening of the street. 

S. W. Bates, in behalf of remonstrants, said the 
tearing down of a part ot the wall of the Club 
House' would necessitate the tearing down of the 
whole of it. As a thoroughfare, the street was 
not so mucli travelled as to require lurther widen- 
ing, and it was not asked for by any numoer of 
persons. He had not come to say much on the 
subject} but first to learn the reasons why the 
widening was asked for. 

H. A.Turner, the petitioner, stated that when he 
first leased the building occupied by him, he un- 
derstood that the city would cut off the Club 
Hou u e building; it was objected to doing it at that 
time on account of the expense ; and in the course 
of a year cr two it was proposed to carry out the 
improvement. A portion of the improvements had 
recently been made, and there was now only the 
Club House building to be cut off— and of this it 
was only needed to remove the lower part of the 
wall which projected beyond the upper portion. 
Tne store occupied by him was injured by the pro- 
jection, and his customers frequently passed it 
without noticing where it was. 

Mr. ParKer said if the lower portion of the wall 
should be taken away it would require the removal 
ot the whole fiont, at great expense. Before many 
years the place would undoubtedly be wanted for 
a store, when the cutting oil, if necessary, could be 
done. 

Charles H. Parker, tor the estate of Mrs. Park- 
man, made objections to the widening, as affect- 
ing that estate- 
Alderman Talbot stated that the gentleman la- 
bored under a false impression in regard to the 
widening. The line of widening extended to that 
estate, but did not touch it. 

The report was recommitted. 

The orders of notice on the proposed widening of 
Boylston street, and the widening ot High street, 
were each taken up for consideration. No person 
appearing in opposition, they were severally re- 
committed. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

The following orders were read a second time 
and passed: 

Order to pay to the heirs of Thos. B. Wales $20,- 
000 for land taken and damages occasioned by the 
widening of Federal street. 

Order for the widening of West Cedar street, on 
its easterly side, between Revere and Phillips 
streets, by taking land of John L. Roberts, con- 
taining 3G)< square feet, at an expense of $800. 

Ordered,~That the Committee on Laying Out and 
Widening Streets be and they hereby are author- 
ized to contract for the removal of Hotel Pelham 
back to the line of widening of Tremont street, 
and to employ such persons to superintend the 
removal ot the same as they shall deem expedient ; 
the expense thereof to be charged to the Tremont 
street loan. 

EXTENSION OF BROADWAY. 

The resolve and order to extend Broadway to 
Albany street, at a cost of $226,500 ; also for a loan 
of $550,000 for that purpose and for construction 
ot bridges, being on their passage, • 



65 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



Alderman Bradlee said that with a sincere de- 
sire to favor such measures of public improve- 
ment as are for the general good, he bad examined 
this project with as much care as he had had time 
to spare for the purpose, but could uot be con- 
vinced of its usefulness. It was objectionable as 
contemplating a long bridge in the air, an') it 
would be little hetter than a nuisance to the ter- 
ritory over which it passes. Not much could be 
gained in disiance if the project ends as this re- 
solve proposes ; and if continued, as it is sup- 
posed it will be, to the vicinity of tbe Common, 
it wili involve a great expense, reacLiog to millions 
of dollars. 

Mr. Bradlee was in favor of widening Dover 
Street bridge, and in connection witb Berkeley 
street, the Milldam can easily be reached. He did 
not believe that the light travel from South Boston 
would be as gi eat as many peisonshave assumed. 
Soutn Boston will become a great manufacturing 
point, andwith the annexation of Dorchester as a 
place of residences, and the proposed avenue across 
the South Bay, in addition to the various other 
avenues, he could not see i.he necessity of the con- 
struction of this avenue, at a great expense. Mr. 
Bradlee said that with every respect for the esti- 
mate of the committee, he did uot believe it was 
possible to accurately state the cost beforehand 01 
such an enterprise. 

Alderman Ha wes was sorry that the gentleman 
did not better know the wants of the people of 
South Boston. Let him come over there and see 
how much the people are. inconvenienced at the 
several bridges, frequently greatly delayed by the 
opening of the draws, and lie would think differ- 
ently of the matter. The widening of the bridges 
would necessitate the widening of the draws, 
which would be a nuisance, for they are already as 
wide as can conveniently be managed. It could 
not be supposed that the construction of a new 
avenue across the South Bav would be any relief 
to the people ol South Boston in getting to this 
part ol the city. 

Aicierraan Talbot, in behalf of the Committee, 
said they had carelully made the estimates and 
believed them to be as correct as it appeared pos- 
sible to make them before actual settlements were 
made with the parties in interest. In regard to 
this avenue, it was well known that he had been 
in favor ol its extension to Washington street, and 
hoped it would be so extended. Hebelieved the 
people of South Boston were entitled to this new 
avenue, and should cheerfully vote for it. 

The vote was taken on the passage of the order, 
and it was carried— yeas 11, nays 1 (Alderman 
Bradlee.) 

BUILDING FOE A NATIONAL PEACE FESTIVAL. 

A petition was presented from George H. Davis 
and others for a change ol location or the struc- 
ture designed lor the celebration ol the Grand Na- 
tional Peace Festival. 

On motion ot Alderman Rice it was voted that 
the petitioners be heard on the subject at the 
present time. 

George H. Davis, one of the petitioners, said he 
did not appear before the Board to advocate the 
measure of Mr. Gilmore; that had already been set 
forth to the public and met with general approval. 
The commiDtee appointed on Saturday had no 
ends to serve, no profit to make, and no pecuniary 
interest at all in the matter. On visiting the pro- 
posed locality at the foot of Boylston street, they 
were convinced that it was not the proper place, 
on account of the inconvenience of access and 
want of drainage. 

It was thought that no objection could be made 
to placing the building on the Common, and tue 
opinion of the City Solicitor had been given favor- 
able to it. The location on the Common would 
also save a great expense on acount of pile driv- 
ing lor a foundation. 'J he only object which the 
Committee had in view was that the project 
should be carried out in a manner which should 
be a credit to the city, State, and everybody inter- 
ested in it. 

M. M. Ballon, also of the committee and peti- 
tioners, sain, be had little to add to what Mr. Davis 
had said. He coincided fully in his views in rela- 
tion to the location ot the building. There was no 
longer a doubt of the success of the project. That 
had become a fixed Tact, and the only question 
was as to putting up of the buildings in a ciedifca- 
ble and sale manner, alter tbe.proper location, was 
decided upon. 



Alderman James inquired ot Mr. Davis if he was 
not awaie tnat the parade ground was uneven. 

Mr. Davis replied that he was ' aware that there 
was an unevenness, and that the ground selected 
on the Back Bay was also uneven'and would re- 
quire the driving of piles for the foundation ot the 
building. 

Alderman James was ot oDinion that the foun- 
dation in the place proposed was equally as good 
as that of the Common. 

Mr. Davis thought it would not be necessary to 
drive piles for a foundation on the Common, and 
as a further argument urged that the structure 
would Ve but, temporary, yet might be used to ad- 
vantage perhaps on the "Fourth ot Julv. It was 
also found that in the pr posed locality it would 
be necessary to procure additional land belonging 
to individuals. 

In answer to Alderman Itichards, Mr. Davis fur- 
ther said that Mr. Matthews, President ot the 
Water Power Company, was willing to aid them, 
but some of the land adjoining had been sold, 
lhe place was also objectionable from being sandy 
and bleak, and he did not doibt that it submitted 
to the people to allow the building to be located 
on the Common 999 out of 1000 would be in favor 
of it. 

In answer to Alderman Bradlee, he said also that 
the Common might be needed three months. It was 
desirable rbat the contracts should be made im- 
mediately, and any delay would be much of a hind- 
rance. The building should be ready for use from 
the 5tb to the 15th of June, and the ground should 
be broken as soon as the host is out ol it. 

To Alderman Talbot he replied that a delay of a 
week would make a difference in the estimates. 
If there were no serious objections, they would 
like to have the matter settled now. 

Mr. P. S. Gilmore said he was sorry that there 
should be any objection to having the proposed 
building on the Common. It would make a great 
difference in the matter of convenience to musi- 
cians and to tbose who might attend upon the 
concerts. There cculd be no doubt that the pro- 
ject would now be a success, for a class of men 
had taken hold ot it who made that certain. 

Another objection which was important, was, 
that the location on Boylston street was so near 
the railroads that the constant noise of the trains 
and tbe whistle of the locomotives would destroy 
the effect of the music. To give tbe proper eclat 
to the project, it should be on Boston Common, so 
w- 1 known everywhere. 

A motion being made to refer the subject to the 
Committee on the Common, 

Alderman Bichards did not believe that it would 
be worth while to reler tbe matter to the Commit- 
tee on the Common, wbo had considered it fully; 
and lie hoped a vote would be taken in the Board, 
today. His objection had been to the disfiguring 
of the Common, and as a matter of principle. 
Granting tbe Common in the present case would 
be claimed as a precedent hereafter. 

To the public, generally, the Common is their 
only chance of getting the benefits derived from 
going into the country ; and it could readily be 
presumed that for the greater part of the summer 
this ground would be occupied in prepara- 
tion *br the building, its occupation by it, and the 
removal of tbe material. 

Alderman Baldwin said he should readily vote 
in favor of location of tbe building on the Com- 
mon, and trusted it would be earned out on the 
magnificent scale which its character warrants. 
He did not fear any precedent of this noble char 
acter, and the nature of this enterprise would pre- 
vent it from becoming a precedent tor most under- 
takings hereafter. 

Alderman Pratt said he had, not given much 
consideration to this subject. As a matter of pre- 
cedent, precedents had already been established, 
ana this was one of those which rarely occur, 
of a cosmopolitan character, in which there 
was not a man, woman cr child in the commu- 
nity who would not be benefited. He din not 
doubt that wherever the building might 
be located, arrangements would be made by horse 
railroads for the convenieuce of the people, yet to 
place it on the Common would greatly accommo- 
date, every one who might attend the Festival. 
Doubtless the Common would be trampled upon 
greatly and be much cut up, by locating such a 
building on it, yet as this was the only mode by 
which the City Government could contribute to 
the enterprise, the expense' of, repanvcojild.be 



MARCH 



5 



18 9. 



66 



easily borne, when so much would result to the 
benefit oi the city. 

Alderman Talbot saia he did not wish to vote on 
tbe subject, without some consultation, so that an 
order uil^Ut be drawn tor the protection of the in- 
terests oi tlie city. 

On his motion, the subject was laid on the table. 

At a subsequent stage of the proceedings oi the 
Board, the following order was offered and passed, 
on motion of Alderman White, the last clause 
being added on motion of Alderman Talbot. 

Ordered, That the Parade Ground on Boston 
Common be granted to Lewis Uice, George B. 
Davis and M.M. Ballou, Buildinff Committee of 
Subscribers to the Musical 1'eace Festival, for the 
purpose of erecting a temporary structure, in ac- 
cordance wiili plans and specifications designed 
lor that purpose ; the said building to be erected 
under the cooperative superintendence of the City 
Lngivieer, Superintendent of Public Building's 
and the Committee on Common and Squares ; said 
grantees to give a satisfactory obligation to the 
city authorities to remove said building from Bo.-- 
ton Common whenever ordered so to do by this 
Board. 

COMMON COUNCIL PAPERS. 

Petitions from the Common Council in relation 
to the East Boston Feriy property, and from 
members of the Fire Department for increase of 
pay, were referred, in concurrence. 

Ihe election of one Weigber and Inspector ot 
Lighters was taken up, and a ballet resulted as 
follows : 

Whole number of votes 12 

Necessary to a choice 7 

Abijah R. Tewksbury 9 

Wm. B. Malonpy 3 

Mr. Tewksbury was declared to be elected in 
concurrence. 

The election of two First Assistant Assessors 
was taken up, when Alderman Baldwin withdrew 
the name of George A. Shaw, at his request. The 
vote was as follows : 

Whole number of votes 12 

Joseph W. Dudley 11 

James H.Tallon 11 

Theophilus Burr 2 

Mr. Dudley was declared to be elected in concur- 
rence, and Mr. Tallon in non-concurrence, in place 
of Mr. Burr. 

The following orders were adopted in concur- 
rence : 

Order for Mayor to petition the Legislature for 
an extension of time in which Church street proo- 
erty-holders may file bills in Equity. 

Order tor Committee on Public Buildings to re- 
port a plan for ventilating the Common Council 
Chamber. 

The report "leave to withdraw" on petition of C. 
R. Classen and others tor an Alarm Bell on the 
Albany Grain Elevator was accepted, in concur- 
rence. 

The request of School Committee that the lot of 
land on the corner oi Berkeley and Newbury 
streets be reserved for school purposes, and 

Request of School Committee that books be fur- 
nished by the city to all pupils in the public 
schools, were severally referred, in concurrence. 

SALARY BILL. 

The salary bill was taken up for action on 
amendments made by the Common Council. 

The several amendments, to increase the salary 
of the City Physician, to decrease the salary of the 
Superintendent of Faneuil Hall Market, to in- 
crease the salary of the Deputy Superintendent of 
Faneuil Hall Market, to increase the pay of the 
various officers ot the Police Department, and the 
diet Engineer and other officers ot the Fire De- 
partment, were all rejected without a count, and 
in most cases unanimously. 

The amendment to decrease the pay of the Su- 
perintendent of Sewers from $3000 to $2500 was 
carried, and the following amendments were 
passed in concurrence : 

Assessors — First Assistants, Ifc. Amend last 
clause so that it shall read as follows: The amount 
of service rendered by the several Assistant As- 
sessors shall be certified by the secretary ot the 
board, in such manner as the Joint Committee on 
the Assessors' Department shall order. 



Amend the next section so as to read as follows: 
Sec. 8. Sessions of the Board of Assessors and 
Assistant Assessors shall be held dailv, beginning 
on the sixteenth day of June, and shall not termi- 
nate sooner than the seventh day of August, un- 
less dissolved by the Board of Assessors. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Alderman Whit's, from the Committee on Li- 
censes, reported in favor of granting various li- 
censes to innholders, for intelligence offices, &c, 
and tor transfer of wagon licenses. Severally ac- 
cepted. 

Also licenses to boys— two newsboys, one as a 
bootblack, one to sell shoe-lacings, and one to sell 
confectionery. Acoepted. 

Also licenses to Alonzo Bond, C. C. Patten and 
to Henry D. Noyes to give concerts, and to John 
Shea to give a sparring exhibition. Accepted. 

Also to persons to keep velocipede rinks, as fol- 
lows: B. W. Carney, 672^ Washington street; 
West & Jordan, 1932 Washington street ; George 
W. Jameson, Lewis street; Wm. C. Lord, 81 Milk 
street; Chamberlain & McNeil, corner of Kneeland 
and Washington streets; Geo. C.Noble, 19 and 20 
Lewis street. Severally accepted. 

Aldeiman Talbot, from the Committee on Streets 
reported no action necessary on sundry notices of 
intention to build. Accepted. 

Alderman White, from the Committee on Health, 
reported in favor of licenses to J. A. & A. Smith, 
Malachi Clark, Benjamin Jones, Michael Gormley 
and G. H.Moseley, for leave to sprinkle certain 
streets in the city. Accepted. 

Alderman White, from the Committee on 
Health, reported leave to withdraw on petition of 
John Nevan and others for abatement of assess- 
ment for a drain. Accepted. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on 
Streets, reported inexpedient on the petition for 
the acceptance ol'Paris street, between Porter and 
Marion streets, and Paris street, northeast ot Por- 
ter street, said street not being up to grade ; also, 
inexpedient on petition for laying out and accept- 
ing a poition of Putnam street, and no action 
necessary on the petition of Thomas Richardson 
to be heard on the subject of damages on Federal 
street, as he has already beeu heard on the sub- 
ject. Severally accepted. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Joint Standing Com- 
mittee on Claims, to whom was referred the peti- 
tion of Jeremiah H. Pote and Oliver Frost, to be 
reimbursed for the expense of building a wall to 
protect their land from excavations made by the 
city, made a report recommending that the peti- 
tioners have leave to withdraw. Accepted. 

Alderman James, from the Committee on Water, 
on te subject of water rates for model lodging 
houses, reported an ordinance regulating such 
rates. Referred to Committee on Ordinances. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on 
Streets, reported a new order to quit on the line of 
Atlantic avenue. The order was adopted, and the 
former one was rescinded. 

Alderman Talbot also made a report on the sub- 
ject of damages from the opening of Avon place. 
The amount given was in the aggregate $77,215, 
for which settlements had all been made. Ac- 
cepted. 

ORDER OF NOTICE. 

The same Alderman reported an order of notice 
on petition of Wm J. Irving ot notice of intention 
to build, No. 8 Cambridge street, that the city pro- 
posed to widen said street. Hearing Monday, 
March 29, 4 P. M. 

Alderman James, from the Committee on Pav- 
ing, reported an order, as follows: 

Ord3red, That the street extending from Wash- 
ington street to Chauncy street, a part of which 
has heretofore been called Avon place, be hereaf- 
ter called and known as Avon street. 

Alderman Talbot suggested that Temple place 
be added to the street to be called Avon street, 
and for a further consideration of the subject, on 
his motion, the matter was laid on the table. 

Alderman James, from the same Committee, of- 
fered the foltowing, which was passed: 

Ordered, That the City Treasurer be and is here- 
by directed to abate the bill of $42 82 against Mary 
Harrigan, for edgestones furnished and sidewalk 
laid by the city in front of" her estate No. 44 Cot- 
tage street, East Boston, she being unable to pay 
said bill. 



67 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



ANNEXATION OF DORCHESTER. 

Alderman VanNostrand, from the Joint Special 
Committee to whom was referred the report of 
the Commissioners on the annexation of Dorches- 
ter to Boston, made a report, in which tney rec- 
ommended the passage ot the following order: 

Ordered, That his Honor, the Mayor, be re- 
quested to petition the General Court, now in ses- 
sion, for the passage of an act to unite the town 
of Dorchester to the City ot Boston, subiect to the 
approval of a majority of the legal voters of both 
corporations, ana that the Committee on the An- 
nexation of Dorchester be authorized, in consul- 
tation with his Honor the Mayor, to represent the 
city before the Committee of the Legislature, to 
whom the petitions may be referred, and take such 
action as they may aeern expedient to secure the 
passage of such an act. 

Passed, and sent down for concurrence. 

ORDERS PASSED. 

On motion of Alderman White, 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Health be 
instructed to lurnish one thousand loads ot ashes 
(more or less) on territory situated on Harris.m 
avcDue, near Dover street, belonging to JohnS. 
Blair, and that said Blair be charged at the rate of 
fifty cents for each load so delivered. 

On motion of Alderman White, 

Ordered, That the Chief of Police be and he is 
hereby directed to clear the sidewalk in Court 
square whenever it is obstructed so as to prevent 
a free passage of persons upon said sidewalk, 
more particularly whentheprison carriage is load- 
ing or unloading there. 



On motion of Alderman White, 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be 
directed to grade Bristol street from Harrison 
avenue to Albany street, with ashes, and that 
the Superintendent of Health be directed to fur- 
nish ashes lor that purpose. 

On motion oi Alderman Kicnards, 

Ordered, That the Chief Engineer be and be is 
hereby authorized to purchase, under the direction 
of the Committee on Fire Department, one pair of 
horses, for Engine Company No. 10, at an expense 
of $850, the same to be charged to the appropria- 
tion for the Fire Department. 

On motion oi Alderman Rice, 

Ordered, That His Honor the Mayor be reques- 
ted to petition the General Court now in session 
for autbority to lay a water pipe through the toivn 
of Winthrop and across Shirley Gut to Deer Isl- 
and, for die puroose of supplying the citj institu- 
tions at Deer Island with pure water. 

Ordered, That the Chief of Police be ana he is 
hereby directed to notify tt-e owner of the estate 
numl eredGl Devonshire street, forthwith to close 
up the cellar-way recently opened in the sidewalk 
iu from. "1 said estate on the corner ot Devonshire 
street and Spring lane, and in default thereof the 
Superintendent ot Streets is hereby directed to 
close up and make solid said opening, at the ex- 
pense ol the owner thereof. 

Ordered, That t:ie Chief Engineer be and he is 
hereby authorized to submit the annual report of 
the Fire Department in print. 

Adjourned. 



68 



COMMON COUNCIL. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 

MARCH 18, 1869. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Common 
Council was held this evening, at 7J£ o'clock, Wm. 
G . Harris, the President, in the chair. 

PAPERS FROM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

The petition of George H. Davis and others, for 
release of conditions in deed from this city on land 
in rear of Newton street, was referred to the Com- 
mittee on Public Lands, in concurrence. 

The report leave to withdraw on petition of J. H. 
Pote et at. to be reimbursed the expense of build- 
ing a wall to protect their land from excavations 
made by the city was accepted, in concurrence. 

The following matters were acted upon in con- 
currence : 

Keference to Committee on Ordinances of Re- 
port and Ordinances concerning Water-rates for 
Model Houses. 

Order tor the Chief-Engineer of the Fire Depart- 
ment to report in print. 

The order requesting the Mayor to petition the 
General Court for authority to lay water-pipes 
through Winthrop across Shirley Gut to Deer Is- 
land was read once. 

The order requesting the Mayor to petition the 
General Court for a law to authorize the annexa- 
tion of Dorchester and Boston, subject to the ap- 
proval of a majority ot the voters, being under 
consideration on its passage, 

Mr. Osborn of W ard Six asked for information 
on the subject. 

No response being made, Mr. Osborn moved that 
it be laid on the table. Carried. 

The resolve and orders for extension of Broad- 
way from Federal street to Albany street, to take 
the parcels of land necessary therefor, and for a 
loan of $550,000, to be appropriated for said exten- 
sion — 

On motion of Mr. Gray of Ward Twelve was 
read by its title, and referred to the Committee on 
Streets of the Common Council, with authority to 
report in point. 

The election of one First Assistant Assessor was 
taken up, when Messrs. Pickering of Ward Four- 
teen, Wadsworth of Ward Four, and Osborn of 
Ward Six, were appointed a committee to receive, 
sort and count the votes. 

Mr. Talbot of Ward Four presented a communi- 
cation from Theophilus Burr, which was read, in 
which he stated that he had been informed of his 
nomination as a candidate for Second Assistant 
Assessor. That nomination he declined, with the 
statement that he had not declined the nomination 
as a candidate for First Assistant Assessor, made 
by the committee. 

Mr. Gray of Ward Twelve inquired if it was un- 
derstood that Mr. Burr was a candidate for First 
Assistant Assessor, and declines the nomination 
as a Second Assistant Assessor. 

The chair stated that such was the fact. 

The ballot had partially been taken when Mr. 
Jenks of Ward Three stated that he had voted for 
two candidates, under a misapprehension. 

Mr. Kich ot Ward Fourteen believed the pres- 
ent balloting to fce informal and moved that it be 
declared null and void. 

After various questions were raised in relation 
thereto, the motion was entertained and carried. 

The Committee reported as follows : 

Whole number of votes 52 

Necessary for a choice 27 

Theophilus Burr 31 

James H. Tallon. 16 

C. E. Grant 4 ; Grant 1 ; Blank 1 6 

Mr. Burr was declared to be elected, in non-con- 
currence. 

The list of jurors, from the Board of Aldermen' 
was accepted. 



SALARY BILL. 

The Salary bill was taken up, the question being 
on receding from the amendments made by the 
Council to the Salary bill, with the exception of 
those for Superintendent of Sewers and Assessors, 
in which the Board of Aldermen concurred. 

Mr. Jenks of Ward Three inquired relative to 
the questions to be acted upon, to which the Chair 
replied that they referred to the whole list. 

Mr. Jenks said he desired to say, as he did a 
week ago, that §1200 a year was as small a salary 
as the police could live upon, and he thought also 
that the pay as provided for the firemen was as 
low as it ought to be. 

The quesiion was taken separately on each 
amendment, the vote being upon receding. 

On the question ot receding from an increase of 
the salary of the City Physician, ihe decrease of 
salary of the Superintendent of Faneuil Hall 
Market and the increase of salary ot the Deputy 
Superintendent of the Market, the votes were in 
the negative, without a count. 

On the question ot receding from an increase of 
pay of lieutenants of police, the vote was 24 to 23. 

On the several other amendments the yeas and 
nays were ordered, and the votes were as follows- ; 

On the increase of pay of sergeants ot police, the 
vote to recede was 26 to 25, as follows : 

Yeas— Batchelder, Belknap, Braman, Butler, 
A. F. Cole, Flanders, Frost, Gay, Going, Gray. 
Hobbs, Hopkins, lngalls, Keith, Learnard, Leigh- 
ton, Osborn, Pickering, Poor, Kich, Richards, 
Snow, Squires, Tucker, Wadsworth, Wilkins. 

Nays — Bond, M. J. Cole, Conant, Crowley, Dins- 
more, Flynn, Hall, Jacobs. Jenks, Johnston, Jud- 
son, Keany, Kingsbury, Malone, Nelson, Noyes, 
Pearson, Pote, Ryan, Talbot, Vannevar, Wells, 
Woods, Woolley, young. 

The vote on receding from increase of pay to 
detectives was 27 to 24, Mr. Vannevar voting yes, 

On the pay of day and night officers, the vote to 
recede was 27 yeas to 23 nays, Mr. Nelson not 
voting. 

The'Council refused to recede on the increase of 
pay to the Cnief Engineer of the Fire Department, 
by a vote of 20 yeas to 29 nays, as follows : 

Yeas— Bond, Braman, A. F. Cole, M. J. Cole, ln- 
galls, Johnston, Keany, Keith, Leighton, Malone, 
Pickering, Poor, Kich, Richards, Snow, Squires, 
Vannever, Wadsworth, Woods, Young. 

Nays— Batcheluer, Belknap, Butler, Conant, 
Crowley, Dinsmore, Flanders, Flynn, Frost, Gay, 
Going, Gray, Hall, Hobbs, Jacobs, Jenks, Judson, 
Kingsbury, Nelson, Noyes, Osborn, Pearson, Pote, 
Ryan, Talbot, Tucker, Wells, Wilkins, Woolley. 

The vote on receding from increase of pay to 
foremen of hook and ladder companies and fore- 
men of hose of engine and hose companies, was 24 
to 23, substantially as above, Messis. Belknap, 
Flanders, Hopkins and Learnard not voting, and 
Messrs. Johnston and Woods voting yea. 

The vote to recede on pay to assistant foreman, 
hosemen and others, was 25 to 23, the additional 
vote in the affirmative being that of Mr. Learnard, 
all others the same. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

The following orders were read a second time 
and passed : 

Order authorizing the Treasurer to pay to the 
National Webster Bank $25, the amount of a lost 
coupon of the Boston Water Loan. 

Order assigning to the Water Board so much of 
the land in WardFifteen, purchased lor the police 
station now being erected, as is not required for 
said station. 

The order requesting Water Board to introduce 
the Lowry hydrants, when the water pipes are 
laid in the Church Street District, being on its 
passage, 

Mr. Wadsworth of Ward Four moved its refer- 
ence to the Water Board, stating in explanation 
that these hydrants were located in the middle of 
the street, and in the winter when there was 
much snow on the ground they could not be got 
open without leaving an unevenness dangerous 
to man and beast. It was true they had been in- 
troduced in the works in Rox bury, but Mr. Ches- 
bro, the engineer at Chicago, had been on here to 
see them, and states that he will not introduce 
them there until they have been sufficiently tried 
here. 

Mr. Kingsbury of Ward Fifteen stated that the 
Lowry hydrants had been introduced into the 



MARCH 18, 186 9 



69 



Highlands, and had been used in Charlestown 
ever since their water works were established, and 
no such inconvenience had been experienced as 
had been raised against them.. He did not think 
it necessary to reier the order to the Water Board. 

Mr. Wadsworth inquired how the difficulty he 
had mentioned could be obviated. 

Mr. Kyan of Ward Thirteen said these hydrants 
were more convenient than the old hydrants. 
Their position in the street was marked on the 
schedule whicn the firemen were furnished with. 
There had been no difficulty about their use in 
narrow streets, lor they had been proved to be 
satisfactory in tiie streets of the Highlands. 

Mr. Wadsworth urged that it would make much 
difference where the streets were not more tnan 
twenty-five feet wide, as in the Church street dis- 
trict. The piling up of the snow in the streets, 
and the digging open the centre of them to get at 
the hydrants, would make very dangerous places. 

Mr. Kyan lurtner spoke upon the point of the fa- 
cility oi finding these hydrants by the firemen, the 
signs indicating the angle and the distance irom 
the buildings or sidewalks, and the firemen being- 
provided with measuring tape to find their loca- 
tion by measurement. 

Mr. Kingsbury said there could be no more diffi- 
culty with these nydrants than there was with the 
old reservoirs, which were got along with very 
well. . 

Mr. Hall of Ward One did not see any necessity 
for the reference to the Water Board at all. It the 
Fire Department were satisfied with these hy- 
drants, that should be enough. 

Mr. Rich of Ward Fourteen moved the reter- 
ence of the order to the Committee on the Fire 
Department of the Common Council. Carried. 

The order authorizing a transfer from the Re- 
served Fund to the appropriation for Health, $14,- 
000; to that for City Hospital. $5000; to that for 
Cemeteries, $1000 ; to that for Fire Alarms, $1000 ; 
and such other transfers as may be necessary in 
closing t*e business of the nuancial year, was 
passeu by a unanimous vote. 

AUDITOR'S ESTIMATES, APPROPRIATIONS AND 
TAX. 

The orders relating to the specific appropriations 
for the financial year 1809-70, and laying a specific 
tax to defray the expenses of the City and County 
of Suffolk lor said year, in printed City Document 
JNo. 33, 1869, were taken up, the question being on 
their final passage. 

Tue several items of appropriation contained in 
the Auditor's estimates, and approved of by the 
Joint Special Committee of the two branches, were 
read over seperately, and no amendments were 
proposed thereto. Toe orders, as already pub- 
lished, relative to the manner ot making expendi- 
tures of mouey, under these appropriations, and 
tDe order for the levy of a tax to meet the v ants of 
the city, were severally passed. The order for 
laying a tax provides for the raising of $7,279,- 

The orders authorizing the erection on Newton 
street ol a Girls' High and Normal Schoolhouse, at 
a cost not exceeding $170,000, and authorizing a 
loan of $170,000, to be appropriated therefor, being 
on their passage, 

Mr. Rich ol' Ward Fourteen said he understood 
that this matter came before the School Commit- 
tee and was not approved of; that it had the 
approbation only of a sub-committee. The 
proposed location was a long distance from 
some portions of the city, and the effect 
of building a schoolhouse there would 
be effectually to prevent the erection of high 
sehoolhouses at the extreme portions of the city, 
and subject those who may attend upon this 
school to travel to it at much inconvenience. That 
the matter may be lurther considered, he moved 
to lay the order on the table. Carried. 

II 



The appointment by the City Messenger of Alvah 
. Peters as Assistant Messenger was approved. 



Messenger was approved. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Mr. Keith ot Ward Fifteen, from the Joint Stand- 
ing Committee on Public Buildings, made a report 
recommending the removal of the staole in the 
AUston Street Schoolhouse yard, the same having 
been complained of as a nuisance by the occupants 
of the adjoining premises. For that purpose they 
recommended the passage of the following order: 



Ordered, That the Superintendent of Public 
Buildings be authorized to remove the s able from 
the yard of the Allston Street Schoolhouse, and to 
fence and pave said yi' rd, the expense thereof to 
be charged to the appropriation for grammar 
schools. Public Buildings. 

Mr. Keith said the stable belonged to the city, 
was of no use where it is, and it had been com- 
plained of by the School Committee and by the 
neighbors as a nuisance. 
The order was read twice and passed. 
Mr. Leighton ol Ward JNine, from the Joint 
Standing Committee on the Assessor*' Department, 
made a report recommending the electioQ of the 
following named persons as Second Assistant- 
Assessors: 

Ward One— Daniel J. Sweeney, John Noble; 
Ward Two— Jaincs Healy, John F. Flynn; Ward 
Three— Theopuilus Burr; Ward Four— F. S. Oar- 
luth, C. W. Forbush; Ward Five— John M. Ma- 
guire, Pierce A. Duherty; Ward Six— Oliver P. 
Bowman; Ward Seven— John A. Johnston; Ward 
Eight— Cadis B. Boyce ; Ward Nine— James Stan- 
dish; Ward Ten— Edward A. Hunting; Ward 
Eleven— Geo. W. Skinner; Ward Twelve— Wm. 
Gallagher; Ward Thirteen— George F. Davis; 
Ward Fourteen— Wm. H. Mcintosh; Ward Fif- 
teen— Samuel P. Blake. 

Mr. .Leighton moved a recommittal of the re- 
port, which was carried. 

Mr. Tucker of Ward Six, from the Joint Special 
Committee to nominate an additional Engineer of 
the Fire Department for East Boston, in accord- 
ance with the ordinance passed February 20, 1809, 
made a report recommending the election ot Jo- 
seph Barnes. 

It was voted to proceed to an election, when 
Messrs. Woolley of Ward One, Kingsbury ot Ward 
Fifteen, and Talbot of Ward Four, were appointed 
a committee to receive, sort and count the votes 
for Assistant Engineer of the Fir j Department. 

The committee reported the whole number ot 
votes to be 47, 41 of which were for Joseph Barnes, 
4 for Charles Simmons and 2 for George P. Dar- 
row. 
Mr. Barnes was declared to be elected. 
Mr. Tucker of Ward Six, from the Committee 
on Rules and Orders of the Common Council, who 
were requested to consider whether any change is 
needed in the rule of the Common Council in re- 
gard to the reading of the minutes of the preced- 
ing meeting, made a report, recommending that 
section 1 ot the rules and orders be amended to 
read as follows: 

"The President shall take the chair precisely at 
the hour to which the Council shall have adjourn- 
ed. He shall call the members to order, and on 
tne appearance of a quorum, shall proceed to bus- 
iness, unless the reading of the minutes ot the 
preceding meeting is called lor by some memoer." 
Tue report was accepted. 

Mr. Nelson of Ward Nine moved to take up the 
order relating to the petition to the Legislature 
on the subject of the annexation of Dorchester, 
assigning as a reason that the Legislature had 
fixed upon a limit tor action on new business. 

Mr. Osborn of Ward Six said he did not wish to 
make any opposition to the measure, but he had 
heard no reason tor annexation given, and be- 
ing absent when the report was made, although he 
understood that it was on our files, had not had an 
opportunity to examine it. 

Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteen said he should be in 
favor of postponement but for the reasons assigned 
by the gentleman from Ward Nine. He thought, 
however, no harm could be done by its passage, 
since the order proviaes that the question of an- 
nexation shall be submitted to the voters of both 
places. 

Mr. Rich of Ward Fourteen stated that theorder 
to fix the limits for the reception of business by 
the Legislature had been rejected. Subsequently 
he stated that such an order was passed, which 
was reconsidered. 

Mr. Jacobs of Ward Five stated that the com- 
mittee desired early action. The whole matter 
relating to annexation and the reason for it are 
contained in the report of the Commissioners, in 
which they are exhaustively set forth. 
The order was read a second time and passed. 
Mr. Osborn of Ward Six offered the following 
order : 

Ordered, That the Committee on Ordinances be di- 
rected so to amend the ordinances as to provide that 
whenever any land shall be purchased for school 



70 



COMMON COUNCIL 



purposes, such purchases shall be made under the 
direction 01 the Committee on Public Instruction. 

Mr. Wells of Ward Three moved that the order 
be laid on the table. Lost. 

Mr. Jenks of Ward Tbree moved an indefinite 
postponement, and that the yeas and nays be 
taken on the motion. 

The question was put on the indefinite postpone- 
ment, and declared to be lost, when the order was 
passeJ. 

Mr. Belknap of Ward Three offered the follow- 
ing order, which was read once : 

Ordered, That the Committee on the Harbor be 
authorized to expend a sum not exceeding five 



hundred dollars, in addition to the amount here- 
tofore appropriated, for repairing the boats and 
scows connected with the steam dredgintr ma- 
chine, said sum to be charged to the appropriation 
lor dredging machine. 

Mr. Jenks of Ward Three inquired it it was not 
in order to call for the yeas and nays on the pas- 
sage of an order, which motion he marie. 

The Chair stated that the motion for the yeas 
and nays should have been made after the motion 
had been stated by the Chair on indefinite post- 
ponement. 

Adjourned. 



71 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 
MARCH 22, 1869. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Board of Al- 
dermen was held tnis afternoon at lour o'clock, 
the Mayor presiding. 

JURORS DRAWN. 

Thirty-eight traverse jurors were drawn for the 
Superior Court, first session, thirty-live for the 
Supreme Judicial Court, and thirty-six for the 
Superior Court, second session. 

APPOINTMENT MADE AND CONFIRMED. 

James K. Crowley, as a Culler of Hoops and 
Staves, in place of Benjamin Abbott, declined. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

John Simmons and others, against the proposed 
change in the name of Sudbury street. 

Mrs. A. B. Niekerson, for abatement of assess- 
ment for sidewalk in Cottage street. 

Joel Merriam and others, order of notice on pe- 
tition to the Legislature tor a railroad from Gard- 
ner to Boston. 

Sweetser & Abbott and others, against the pro- 
posed change of name of Temple place to Avon 
street. 

Jewett & Pitcher, for acceptance of an act au- 
thorizing them to build a railroad track in East 
Boston. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Paving. 

L.B.Harrington, for abatement of an assess- 
ment on estate on Vernon street for a sewer in 
said street. 

Michael Conroy, for abatement of assessment 
for a sewer in Wa'shington street. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Sewers. 

Samuel Little aLd others, that Zeigler street be 
extended to Wa?hington street. 

Mrs. C. A. Gardiner, for change in assessment of 
betterment on High street. 

Leonard "Ware and others, for removal of ob- 
structions projecting over the line of Grove Hall 
avenue. 

Edward Tuckerman, against the extension of 
Washington street through his estate on Cornhill. 

George B. Wilbur and 84 others, for the exten- 
sion of Devonshire and Washington streets to 
Haymarket square. 

C. 1*. Morse and others, for the same object. 

Heirs of William Reynolds, against a change in 
the streets on Fort Hill. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Streets. 

Wm. Pray, for leave to erect a stable for more 
than four horses on Woodward street. 

Andrew Cain, for abatement of assessment for 
removal of a nuisance in Orange court. 

Orsamus Nute, for leave to sprinkle certain 
streets in this city. 

I.eander H.Jones, for leave to sprinkle certain 
streets in this city. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Health. 

George M. Stevens & Co., for leave to project a 
clock into Sudbury street in front of their store. 

Cook & Jordan, for a location of their coal office 
on a portion of Maiden street. 

Severally referred to Committee on Police. 

Solomon S. Gray, to be relieved from certain con- 
ditions of sale in deed of city's land to him on M 
street. Keierred to Committee on Public Lands. 

C. Stratton and others, that the licenses granted 
to George D. Follett and Peter R. Garvey on Elm 
street be revoked. Referred to Committee on 
Licenses. 

Boston Labor Reform Institute, that the eight- 
hour system be adopted in all departments of city 
work. Referred to a Joint Special Committee, 
consisting of Aldermen Hawes and Van Nostrand, 
with such as the Common Council may join. 

Neil Doherty and others, for a lamp in Samoset 
place. Referred to Committee on Lamps. 

Co. A, 1st Cavalry, for better armory accommoda- 
tions. Referred to Committee on Armories. 



New England Female Medical College for leave 
to exchange a lot of land on East IS ewton street 
for another lot. Referred to Committee on Public 
Lands. 

NOTICES OF INTENTIONS TO BUILD. 

H. M. Wilson, 23 Essex street; Miller & Horton 
Gates street ; John Kramer, Chadwick street ; J. E. 
Blakemore, Eighth street, between Kand I streets; 
James Devine, Fourth street, between C and D 
streets ; William Peard, Fourth street, between C 
and D streets; Henry Grimes, Seventh street, 
between D and E streets; Davis Damon, 
Eutaw street, between Marion and Brooks 
streets; E. Pinkham, Princeton street, be- 
1 ween Preseott and Eagle streets; John H. Wig- 
glesworth, corner of E and Third streets ; W. A. & 
S. G. Low, rear 131 Hudson street; A. S. Ripley, 
298 Tremont street ; N. J. Bradlee, corner of Milk 
and Congress streets; Edwin Adams, cor- 
ner Beacon and Dartmouth streets; W. H. Hony- 
will, Cabot street, opposite Warren street; Wil- 
liam M. Rumery, Bath street; Alonzo Warren, 
Federal street, in Washington Village; J. C. 
Crowley, corner of Bedford and Chauncey streets; 
I. & H. M. Harmon, 186 Beacon street; 
John Quinn, Broadway ; Edwin Adams, 
Dennis street, opposite Woodville square ; Nath'l 
Freeman, corner of Philips and Grove streets ; 
Richard Collins, 30 Battery street; Union Penny 
Savings Bank, corner of W ashmgton and Union 
Park streets; I. & H. M. Harmon, Boylston street, 
between Berkeley and Clarendon streets, and on 
the corner of Commonwealth avenue and Claren- 
don street. Severally referred to the Committee 
on Streets. 

HEARINGS ON ORDERS OF NOTICE. 

The hearing on the order of notice on the pro- 
posed widening ot High and Summer streets was 
taken up. No person appearing, the order for wi- 
dening was recommitted. 

The hearing on the proposed widening at the 
corner of Congress and Milk streets was taken up. 
No person appearing, the order was recommitted. 

LAVING OUT AND WIDENING STREETS ON FORT 
HILL. 

The several orders of notice of intention to lay 
out, widen and grade certain streets on Fort Hill 
were taken up. 

The orders in relation to the several streets were 
considered separately, and parties were heard, as 
follows: 

William Doran said he had a little property 
which he had been forty years in acquiring, and 
did not wish to part with it until he knew how 
much he was going to get for it. He was now get- 
ting $2100 a year, with a small outlay, and as he 
was now past labor, and did not wish to go to the 
poor house, he repeated that he wished to know 
what he should get for it. 

Maurice O'Connell said he owned a small estate 
on Sturgis place, which would be affected by the 
order, and ne did not know what the designs of 
the city were. On a consideration of the matter 
by the Board, he believed it would be found to be 
better to widen Pearl place. Four years ago par- 
ties petitioned the Legislature tor the cutting 
down of Oliver street, when it was looked upon as 

mad scheme. There are plans in every 
insurance office in this city, in relation to the va- 
rious schemes in contemplation, and he feared 
there were interested parties who were seeking to 
make their fortunes, while many persons would 
lose much of what they had. Believing that the 
Board bad no interest in the opening of Sturgis 
place, he hoped such a course would be taken as 
would be best for the public good. This would be 
to extend Pearl place to Broad street, which could 
be done at much less expense than the opening ot 
Sturgis place. 

If, however, it was designed to open Sturgis 
place, he hoped the widening would be on tne 
north side rather than on the south side. There 
were at least two hundred persons interested in 
these projects for improvements, and he trusted 
thev would not be carried out to the benefit ot 
speculators, and to the injury ot present owners of 
property. 

George C. Beckwith made some remarks in rela- 
tion to the opening of Hartford place. He said he 
did not object to the widening of Pearl place and 
its extension to Wendell place ; but in behalf of 
several persons he objected to the extension of 
Hartford place. Nobody would be benefited by 
the extension except several stores on Pearl street. 
The benefit to the abutters on Oliver street and 



MAKCH a 3 



18 6 9 



73 



Teai 1 place would be so lit:lo -that the abuttoi-s 
would not be benefited to the extent of one per 
cent., and would be unwilling to pay betterments. 
If such an opening must be made, it would be only 
for the rear entrances on the Pearl street stores, 
aud they shouid'pay the betterments, 

William F.Weld objected to a portion of the 
proposed widening of High street, we thought if 
the widening extended only to the stores at the, 
corner of Pearl street, it would answer very well 
the purpose and save a great expense to the city.. 
As the owner of the store property at the corner 
he diet not wish to have it cut off and lessened in 
value, as it would be, and the cutting off, he sub- 
mitted, would be attended with gveat expense. 
He thought the street was wide enough at tav 
corner to answer every purpose. 

Mr. Johnson appeared in behalf of Wm. G. Cole, 
a poor man, who bad a small piece of property on 
Washington avenue. He wished to know what: 
compensation he was to receive before he was re- 
quired to part with his property, and supposed it 
io be necessary to appear before the Board. 

Alderman Talbot stated that there was no neces- 
sity lor his being heard in the matter, and that the 
taking of ihe property would be a matter of nego- 
tiation between tiie city and the owners of the 
property. 

Joshua B. Fowle appeared in relation to th© .wi- 
dening of Purchase street. He established his 
factoiy there some fifteen years since, and it took 
all that he had to put his business in operation. 
The widening would take fifteen to twenty feet of 
his land, and would ruin it for his business. On 
his own account, and for that of his sons, if he 
was obliged to remove, he wished to have suffi- 
cient notice, so that they could establish their 
business elsewhere without injury to them. 

The several orders were recommitted. ( 

Alderman Talbct, in reply to inquiries of Mr. 
Doran, relative to being turned outoi his property 
without notice or time to remove elsewhere, stated 
that it would take six or eight weeks to get the 
measure passed through the City Government,, 
and that it could not be earlier than the middle of 
June or 1st of July before anything could be done 
in disturbing the owners of the property. 

THE COLISEUM ON THE COMMON. 

Alderman Bradlee read remonstrances from 
"Win. Gray, Gardner Brewer & Co. and 650 others, 
against the erection of any building on Boston 
Common, and moved that the remonstrants be 
heard on the subject. 

It was voted that the remonstrants be heard, 
and following the announcement that any person 
present who desired it had an opportunity to give 
his views in favor of the remonstrance, there was 
a considerable pause. 

George B. Emerson said he had been invited by 
several persons to say something on this subject. 
He was not interested personally in any degree, in 
relation to the occupation of the Common ; but on 
account of his love for beauty, aud the interest 
which a great number of people have in the Com- 
mon, as their only place of enjoyment in the warm 
season of the year, he desired to say something in 
their behalf- He usually spent the summer sea- 
son by the seaside, and consequently Had no per- 
sonal interest. 

As he walked through the northerly part of the 
city, where the people are crowded together, with 
little enjoyment of air, he thanked God that they 
had the Common to which they could resort as 
their breathing place, and as the play-ground of 
the young. The population of the city is becom- 
ing more and more dense every year, and the play- 
ground of the poor more limited, and he depre- 
cated every measure which should lessen their 
means of enjoyment. The budding proposed 
would have that effect, and as a precedent he 
objected to it, as calculated to lead to great evil. 

Kev. Dr. S. K. Lothrop said he had been desired 
by some of his friends to come here and say some- 
thing on the subject. He hardly thought it neces- 
sary to say anything, since the ventilation of the 
matter had been so thorough in the newspapers, 
and the argument had been all on one side, and it 
could hardly be supposed that any other course 
could be taken than that the city fathers would re- 
consider their action ©f last week. 

The question first to be considered was whether 
the Common was necessary for the proposed build- 
ing. He thought it was not the most convenient 



spot lor such a building, and not necessary that it 
shall be placed there, there were other locations 
on the Back Bay much more suitable, and as con- 
venient. That point settled, he did not suppose a 
building could be erected on the Common without 
piles. It was within the memory of many people 
when most of the parade ground was a quagmire. 

It was not necessary that one should be an ar- . 
chitect to decide the question whether or not 
there should be pile driving. As a member of the 
School Committee, he could not consent that the 
children who were to take part in the proposed 
concert should be subjected to any such risk as to 
go into a building which would be unsafe. The 
building once commenced, it would be found nec- 
essary taat piles should be driven, and having au- 
thority to do so, then the question would arise 
whether the building should not be permanent. 

A budding for large concerts and such like uses 
was necessary for great occasions, and he thought 
ii would be better to put up a permanent building 
elsewhere, He did not believe that such a build- 
ing would ever he permitted to remain on the 
Common, for public opinion would not allow of it. 
Taking into view all the important questions in 
relation tv. the matter, although he was in sympa- 
thy with the proposed festival, he did not think 
that the parties had any special claim upon the 
people for the use of the Common. ■■ 

Beyond all these questions the great question 
arose whether the city had a right to allow such a 
building to be put up. 

Alderman James stated that the City Solicitor ■ 
had given his opinion, in writing, that there is no 
legal objection to putting up such a building as. 
was proposed, 

Mr. Lothrop inquired how long the Common 
would be occupied by the building. , 

Alderman James stated thit it might be three 
months, counting the time occupied in putting it ■ 
up and the time of its removal. 

Mr. Lothrop said if it could he so occupied three 
months, why not three years, and parties might , 
claim it on the ground of precedent with equal 
force as to its being for the public good. It was a 
serious question tor this Board to consider, and 
he hoped the action of last week would be re- 
versed. 

Alderman Bradlee offered a remonstrance from 
school boys against the use of the Common by the 
proposed building ; thereby restricting their play, 
ground. 

Dr. Jacob Bigelow said he should not be consid- 
ered as belonging to that class. He was request- 
ed to give a medical opinion as to the effect on the 
general health by the occupation of the Common 
by a building, but he was unwilling to give such 
an opinion on £ short notice, and did not desire to 
weaken the arguments which had been offered on 
the subject with so much force. He would not call 
in question the integrity of the City Government 
in this measure, but would suggest that the City 
Hall and the addition to the State House had cost 
much more than was anticipated; and while he 
would not either question the good intention of 
the men who countenance this matter, he feared 
that the cost would be so much greater than is 
estimated, that when the building is once up and 
it is found that the expenditures much exceed the • 
receipts, the parties will come to the City Govern- 
ment, with a plea for the extension of time in 
which it shall remain, that they may be ieim 7 
butsed. 

In regard to convenience and accessibility, the 
landa on the Back Bay were easily accessible, and 
the plot in the vicinity of the Institute of Tech^ 
nology was reached by the cars which were frer 
quently running. He did not believe this building 
would affect the public health, but he was a be- 
liever in an abundance of air as necessary to the 
public health, and that the city was already too 
much crowded for a free circulation of air. 

Henry B. Rogers said he did not make objection 
on the ground which had been stated, Dufc chiefly 
for the reason that he had always looked upon the 
Common as a sort of sacred place. He had been 
about the world considerable, and had seen larger 
parks, but none more beautiful than Boston Com- 
mon. It was a place of beauty and of enjoyment, 
not for the resident on Beacon street alone, but 
for every man in the city. On Sunday the poor 
man and his children can partake of the enjoy- 
ment of the place, and he would not part with the 
privileges which it afforded to all classes for his* 



73 



BOARD OF A L D E R M E N 



right hand. It was the only breathing place we 
have, and should not be restricted. 

Mr. Rogers further objected on the ground of 
precedent, assuming that if once intruded upon 
parties having other objects in view would urge 
that it had already been granted for the further- 
ance of private interests, and the Common would 
come to be used for anything and everything. 
The Common was not intended for one man, but 
it was for every man's benefit, and no precedent 
should be established granting its use to any one 
man, to the injury of the whole community. 

Mr. J. T. Prince said he coincided with everything 
which had been said, but there was one ground 
which bad not been mentioned. He objected to it 
on the ground ot policy. 

Mr. G. Bradford said his words had been taken 
away by a previous speaker. The Common was 
not lor the special benefit of the people of Beacon 
street, who are away most of the summer, but for 
the poor, and as he sometimes walked there on 
Sunday, among the multitudes, he could not see 
one person whom he knew. 
• This project was one of speculation, to which 
railroad corporations and keepers of hotels bad 
subscribed. It was simply a question of prcfii and 
loss, and if successful, large amounts of money 
will hereafter be paid for the use of- the Common. 
He hoped it would not be for this administration 
of the City Government to establish the bad pre- 
cedent of bartering away the use of the Common. 

C. H. Dalton, a signer of a remonstrance, wished 
to correct ai impression which was prevalent, 
that the signers of the remonstrance were opposed 
to this jubilee. That was not true, for he was cog- 
nizant ot tbe movement of the remonstrants. He 
read a letter from some persons who bad acom- 
munication with Gov. Claflin, relative to a plot of 
land in the vicinity of the Institute of Technology. 
The Governor assented to the proposition while he 
said it might be necessary to procure a resolve 
from tbe Legislature for the occupation of tbe plot 
of ground. 

It was in the memory of many persons that a 
proposition was made a few years since to put up 
barracks on the Common for the reception of vol- 
unteer soldiers, but this was denied for such use, 
and he thought that if it could not be used fOr the 
accommodation and comfort of enlisted soldiers, 
it should not be used to celebrate a peace which 
those same soldiers achieved . , 

Alderman Bradlee said he was heartily in sym- 
pathy With the remonstrants who had been heard, 
and not deeming it necessary to say anything on 
the subject, he would submit the following order, 
which be trusted would be adopted : 

Ordered, That the order granting the use of the 
parade ground on Boston Common to the Building 
Committee of the subscribers to the Musical Peace 
Festival, for the purpose of erecting a temporary 
structure thereon, be and the same hereby is re- 
scinded. 

■ Alderman Baldwin, in opposing tbe adoption of 
the order, said he thought the remonstrants occu- 
pied a singular position. He did not doubt that all 
of them would say that they were in favor of this 
great enterprise. Their position was something 
like that wbich wbuld be exhibited by a person 
who should throw out his invitations ail over the 
State for a grand banquet, and when his- guests 
arrived, they should find the parlors and other 
roomS'dosed to them,andh& should say to these 
guests there is the kitchen, go in and have a good 
time. In his View, the remonstrants were gener- 
ally those wbo were opposed to tbe enterprise and 
had not subscribed anything towards. carrying it 

out. 

The parties who bad petitioned for the wse of 
the Common for i this enterprise had subscribed 
$91,000 to carry it out^aml had exertions been 
made to obtain petitions; they might easily have 
been had at great length. In looking over the 
names of the remonstrants, it Will be found that 
many of them are non-residents. He bad no ob- 
jections to non-residents signing such petitions, 
but the Mayor and Aldermen had a right to know 
where petitioners reside. The parties who had 
subscribed to this enterprise believed no place to 
be so suitable- as the Common^ -and he did not be- 
lieve that the receipts would be more than one- 
third anywhere else. 

Alderman Baldwin read the names of many of 
the subscribers, and remarked that, as a lOofcer- 
on, to his view this was the only place. in tbejeoun- 
try where an indifference existed on this subject. 



All over the country there was a strong feeling in 
the matter. So far a« related to the legal right to 
use the Common for this purpose, he would like to 
know where we have to look for that right if not 
to the opinion of the City Solicitor. Many persons 
look at the matter from a Wrong standpoint. 

This was notlike the exhibition of a menagerie 
or other exhibition for pecuniary gain, and it 
could never be claimed as a precedent for such 
purposes. It was a matter of great interest to the 
city, in its aavantages and prosperity: Men of 
good judgment have estimated that if properly car- 
ried out it would in all probability bring one mil- 
lion of strangers to this city. If it shall So proye, 
each one of these persons will leave or spend here 
$50, making an aggregate of $50,000,000. 

It was obiected that this use of tbe Common 
would deprive the citizens of their rights. The 
Common contains forty-eight acres, and this build- 
ing will occupv one acre. The war which we had 
gone through had alienated the -Southern people 
from us. That is now over, and our interest should 
be to promote fraternal feeling.'. This prbjeict was 
calculated to prumdte sue b a- feeling ; arid there 
could be no better Way than in a grand anthem of 
praise to God for the return of peace. 

Alderman Richards stated that he had already 
given his reasons against the measure, believing 
that the beauty of the Common Would be destroyed 
during the Summer, and that it would be a bad 
precedent. It had been said that 999out of every 
1000 would be in favor of the Common for the pro- 
posed building. Since the last meeting of the 
Board ttiat impressionhad been removed, for he 
had found two out of every three be met opposed 
to the use of tbe Common. 

Another statement was that while piles would 
be needed in St. James park, none would be re- 
quired on the Common. Gentlemen who formerly 
believed the Common firm enough without piling, 
now entertained doubts. He had no doubt that if 
the foundation were made broad enough, the build- 
ing would stand safely. If the location was not 
changed by the board, it was advisable for tbe gen- 
tlemen interested in the erection of the building 
to consider whether the questions as tothe suita- 
bleness of the site, the money considerations in- 
volved, and tbe desirableness of harmony among 
the citizens, did not make it expedient to erect the 
building elsewhere. He did not believe if any 
person had determined to come tO the city on ac- 
count of the festival, that they would be deterred 
on the ground of its locality, -whether on the-Baek 
Bay or at tbe South End. It would not affect it to 
the amount of five-percent. 

Alderman Richards said be had noticed in one 
of the daily papers a remark that-the passing- of 
the order at the-lastmeeting Of the Board -was a 
trap, or trick. That was not true. He was instru- 
mental in bringing on the action,- and did so in the 
belief that, as the matter had once been referred 
tothe Committee on the Common, it was desira- 
ble the question should be taken at once, not 
doubting that it would be rejected .• H ad the order 
laid over, until remonstrances had been received, 
it would probably never have been adopted. 

Alderman Pratt Temarked' that be hadbut little 
to savJ From what had been said it- might be in- 
ferred that the members of the Board ot Alder- 
men were wanting in local, pride regarding -the 
uses of the Common. 

As a> Boston boy be would not yield to any one 
in relation to his regard iot the Boston Common, 
believing in the Hub to the fullest extent, and in 
Boston Common. ! He was glad to see so many 
persons present to take an interest in this matter. 
It was an assurance that when any encroachments 
on the Common shall be attempted which- are not 
for the public benefit the people Will be alive to 
the matter, and will prevent its perversion from 
the uses of the public. He did not believe the use 
of the Common would be granted recklessly or 
thoughtlessly, regardless of the tastes of the peo- 
ple. The Board of Aldermen had to look at the 
subject as it affected trade and enterprise, and in 
its action bad simply regarded the greatest good 
of the greatest number. 

It had been said the boys were opposed to this 
use of the Common. - Be- was in favor of /giving 
the boys a plaee for their enjoyment. Let anyone 
cross the Common in the season of base ball, and 
it is at therisk of his limbs, and he regarded the 
plaving ot baseball on the Common asanuisance. 
He" had been- in favor, and should advocate the 
playing of base ball some whereelse. , He hoped 



M ABC.H , .a 3, 18 6 9 



74 



the Board of Aldermen would adhere to its vote 
on this subject. 

The question was taken on the passage of the 
order of Alderman Bradlee, and it was rejected. 

COMMUNICATION FROM THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

A proposition from the School Committee lor a 
convention April 13th, to fill a vacancy in that 
Board occasioned by the resignation of James E. 
Marsh, a member from Ward Thirteen, was con- 
curred in. 

... -UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

The following orders were read a second time 
ami passed : 

Ordered, That the City Treasurer be directed to 
refund to Isaac Samuels the amounts paid by him 
in 1861 for, tax titles on portions of two houses on 
Springer place and Eighth street, together with 
interest thereon at the rate of six per cent, per an- 
num, amounting in all to $28 84 ; said sum to be 
charged to the receipts for taxes. 

Ordered, That there be paid to John L. Roberts 
the Sum of $800, for land taken and damages occa- 
sioned by the widening of West Cedar street. 

Ordered, That there be paid to the heirs of Eliza- 
beth Kandall the sum of $2008, for land taken and 
damages occasioned by the widening of Tremont 
street, $20i)0 for damages and $8 being the amount 
collected tor the sale of old building material. 

Ordered, That there be paid to Marv V. Kandall 
the sum of $7060, for land taken and damages oc- 
casioned by the widening of Tremont street, $60 
being the amount received for old building mate- 
rial. 

Ordered, That there be.paid to the heirs ot Sarah 
Holmes $1616 28, for land taken and damages occa- 
sioned by the widening and grading of Oliver 
street, $1332 10 awarded lor land, and $284 18 fer 
for interest -thereon at six per cent, from Sept. 6, 
1865. v ' 

COMMON COUNCIL PAPERS. 

Petitions from the Common Council was re- 
ferred, in concurrence. 

The nomination and confirmation of Alvah H. 
Peters, as Assistant Messenger of the City Coun- 
cil, was concurred in. v 

The report, on nomination • of Second Assistant 
Assessors, was recommitted, in concurrence, 
c The . following -orders were passed, in concur- 
rence :■ 

Order to pay National Webster Bank $25, the 
amount of a lost coupon of City Stock. 

Order proposing amendment of Ordinance*- so 
that the Committee on Public Instruction may 
purchase sites for Schoolhouses. 

Order to transfer from Reserved Fund $14,000 to 
Health, $5000 to City Hospital, $1000 to Cemeteries 
and $1000 to Fire Alarms. 

The report and order for removal of- stable from 
Allston Street Schoolhouse yard being under con- 
sideration, 

Alderman Pratt wished to- know i whether the 
land on which the stable stands mightinot be sold 
to advantage, believing that it was not required 
for the schoolhouse yard. 

Alderman Richards stated that the building ad- 
joining the stable was about to be removed, and as 
they were joined in part together, it was thought 
best to remove it ; it had also been complained of, 
and was a detriment to the schoolhouse. 

Alderman Talbot stated that the land upon which 
the stable stands, as back land, would not bring 
much, and it would not be desirable to sell it. 

The order was passed. 

The election or an additional Assistant Engineer 
of the Fire Department for East Boston was taken 
up, when the report of the committee to nominate 
a candidate was accepted, and Joseph Barues was 
elected by a unanimous vote, in concurrence. 

The election of one First Assistant Assessor was 
taken up, resulting as follows: 

Whole number of votes 12 

N ecessarv to a choice 7 

James H. Tallon 8 

Theophilus Burr 3 

Chas. E. Grant 1 

Mr. Tallon was declared to be elected in non-con- 
currence. 

SALARY BILL. 

The amendments made by the Common Council 
to the salary bill were taken up for concurrence. 

The proposition for the increase of the salary of 
the City Physician was first considered. 



Alderman Talbot stated that the matter of . sala- 
ries had been well considered, and he hoped the 
action of the Board would be adhered; to. 

Alderman Pratt ipquired whetfier the salary of 
the City Physician had hot been reduced? 

Alderman Talbot replied that it had. 

Alderman Pratt said it was immaterial, but if, as 
had been asserted the perquisites of the office 
were greater than the salary, he thought the sal- 
ary should be increased to a,sumcient ,sum to se- 
cure the best services, and the perquisites should 
be cut off. ' ' n ' 

After some further debate, on, the subject, the 
amendment of the Council was ndn-confcurredln. 

The several other Amendments iqr decrease Of 
salary of Superintendent of Faneuil Hall Marjtet, 
and increase o salary of the Deputy Superintend- 
ent, were non-c,ohcurred in. 

The amendment to increase the salary of the 
Chief Engineer of tfie Fire Department .was' lost 
by a tie vote, six. to six. 

APPROPRIATION AND. TAX, .BILL. 

The Appropriation bill was taken up, its several 
items considered and, approved, and the orders 
accompanying it, relating to the manner of dis- 
bursing money and laying a tax to meet the ex- 
penditures of the city for the next financial year, 
were severally passed in concurrence.' 

... REPORTS, OF, COMMITTEES. , 

Alderman White,,froni,the Committee on Licen- 
ses, reported in favor of licensing four newsboys , 
and the transfer of several wagon licenses. Sever- 
ally accepted. 

Alderpian White, also reported in favor of a 
lipense to J. E. Davis, to give a concert at 'Me- 
chanics Hall; to James B. Gorman, to give an en- 
tertainment at 119 ^Haverhill street ; to H. B. Good- 
win and others, to give a concert at Institute Hail ; 
to Ro.bjnsop & Co. for i, velocipede rink at 587 
Washington strpet, and G. F. Cobb,vel6cipede rink 
oh. Xremont, street, opposite Phillip street. Sever- 
ally accepted. ' 

Aldermaii Seaver, from the .Committee on' Po- 
lice, q,n the subject of an alleged dangeirou.s' wall at 
23 Rpcfiesterlstreet, reported that the said wall 
was not so dangerous as to require the interference 
of the Board,! and tfiat no fiirther action was neces- 
sary qn the sjibject. Accepted.' 

Alderman 'IJalbot,, from, the Committee on 
Streets, reported no action ' necessary on sundry 
notices Of intention to build'. t Accepted. 

Alderpnan Fairbanks, from! the /Committee, on 
Sewers, reported lp.ave to withdraw 1 on the petition 
of Xuther ,Far>vell 4nd others, for the extension of 
the'Shawmut avenue sewer to Sterling street, and 
on petition ot the House of the Angel Guardian for 
an abatement of assessment for sewers'. Severally 
accepted. 1 

•Alderman White, front the Committee on 
Health, reported in favor of the petitions of Fred- 
erick Sowden ahd' Jplm KJelley , for leave tp sprin- 
kle;streets.,. Accepted. " '" 

Alderman Richards, from the Committee on 
Public Buildings, who were directed to select a 
site in South Boston, and procure plans and esti- 
mates for the erection thereon of a Hook and Lad- 
der House, made a report that after consultation 
with the Committee on the Fire Department, it 
has been decided that the most favorable location 
for the proposed house is on the lot of land 
on Fourth street, owned by the city and partly oc- 
cupied by the ward-room building and engine- 
house No. 1. The Committee have procured plans 
which, with the location, have been approved by 
the Committee on the Fire Department, and from 
estimates which they have received, find that it 
will cost $16,000 to erect the building. They there- 
fore recommend the passage of the following or- 
ders: 

Ordered, That the Committee on Public Build- 
ings be authorized to build a Hook and Ladder 
House on Fourth street, at an expense not exceed- 
ing $16 000. 

Ordered, That the Treasurer be authorized to 
borrow, under the direction of the Committee on 
Finance, the sum of $16,000, to be appropriated for 
the erection of a Hook and Ladder House in 
Fourth street. 

Read twice and passed. 

Alderman White, from the Joint Standing Com- 
mittee on Public Instruction, to whom was re- 
ferred the request of the School Committee that 
the City Council would build a primary school- 



75 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



house within the Brimmer District, in or near the 
Church street district, made a report that they 
had made a careful inspection of the present pri- 
mary school accommodations in this ' district, and 
rind that they are in such a condition as to inter- 
fere seriously with the continued prosperity of 
the school. 

The average number of pupils attending the 
primary schools in the district is 525. The build- 
ing in Newbern place, containing three rooms, is 
very old, having been in use more than thirty 
years, and badly located. The six room building 
on Warrenton street, never properly adapted ior' 
school purposes, has been rendered still more un-, 
suitable by the widening of Tremont street, by 
which the yard has been contracted, and air ex- 
cluded. 

The Committee are of the opinion that two new 
school-buildings should be erected in this dis- 
trict without delay, as thirteen classes are to be 
accommodated, and one building will not be suffi- 
cient. Two Jots have been selected on the Church 
street district ; one on Berlin street, of sufficient 
size for a ten-room schoolhouse, and the other on 
the corner of Fayette and Church streets, for a. 
six-room schoolhouse— which will be ample for 
the present and prospective wants ol the district. 
The Committee recommend the passage of the ac- 
companying orders : 

Ordered, That the lot of land belonging to the 
city of Boston situated between Berlin street and 
Madison place, as shown on a plan of the Church 
street district, drawn by the City Surveyor, con- . 
taining 10,800 square feet, more or less, be set 
apart for the purposes of a Primary School; alto 
that the lot ol land belonging to the city situated 
on Church street, between Fayette and Knox 
streets, containing 5000 square feet, more or less, 
be set apart for the purposes of a Primary School. 

Ordered, that the Committee on Public Build- 
ings be requested to obtain plans and estimates 
for a mimary school building, to contain ten 
rooms and a hall, to be located on the lot of land 
set apart for the purpose on Berlin street : aiso to 
obtain plans and estimates for a primary 
school building, to contain six rooms and 
a hall, to be located on the lot of land set apart for 
the purpose, on the corner of Church and Fay- 
ette streets ; the plans for said buildings to be ap- 
proved by the Committee on Public Instruction, 
and the expense of procuring the same to be 
charged to the appropriation for Primary Schools. 

A motion was made that the orders be read a 
second time and passed. 

Alderman Talbot suggested that the orders be 
divided, in the belief that one only of these school- 
houses was indispensable at the present time. He 
thought that the schoolhouse on Warrenton street 
would answer for the present. 

After remarks by Aldermen Pratt and Eichards 
in iavor of the passage of both ot the orders, they 
were read again and passed. 

Alderman Richards, from the Joint Standing 
Committee on Public Buildings, to whom was re- 
ferred the petition of Engine Company No. 9, for 



the alteration and repair of the house occupied by 
them, made a report that they have carefully ex- 
amined the subject, and in their opinion the re- 
pairs should be made. From estimates which they 
have received, they find that it will cost §9500 to 
make the necessary repairs and alterations, and 
they therefore recommend the passage of the fol- 
lowing order : 

Ordered. That the Committee on Public Build- 
ings be authorized to alter and repair Engine 
House No^ Nine, at an expense not exceeding 
$9500, to ce charged to the appropriation for 
Public Buildings. 
Bead twice and passed. •■' ; 

OKDEKS -PASSED: 

On motion of Aldermarr^eaver, •• 

Ordered, That in addition to the ferry accommo- 
dations heietofore ordered by this Boardito be fur- 
nished by the East Boston Ferry Company, said 
Company shall run another ferry boat between the 
landings formerly occupied by the People's Ferry 
Company from seven o'c ock A. M. to seven 
o'clock P. M. 

On motion of Alderman Bichards, 

Ordered, Tuat the Committee on Public Build- 
ings be allowed tor expenditures on beating ap-' 
paratus and radiators for Lawrence Schoolhouse, 
the sum of $700, in addition to the amount hereto- 
fore allowed, said amount to be charged to the ap- 
propriation for grammar schools. Public Build- 
ings. 

On motion of Alderman Baldwin, 

Ordered, That irom and after the 1st of April, 
1869, until otherwise ordered, there be allowed and 
paid to Co. B, 1st Battalion of Cavalry, M. V. M. . 
$300 per annum for rent of armory, in addition to 
the amount heretofore allowed. 

Ordered, That the rooms now occupied at 
Waitt's Hall by Co. K of the First Infantry be 
approved as suitable for an armory, at a rent of 
$300 per annum, instead of $250, as heretofore or- 
dered, said rent to commence from 1st January, 
1869. 

ORDERS OF Sfe.TICE. 

On the petition ot Hill Brothers for leave to lo- 
cate a steam engine and boiler on F and Third 
streets ; hearing Monday, April 12th, 4 P.M. 

On the proposed construction of a sewer in High 
street, between Federal and Summer streets ; also 
rebuilding of the sewer in Blossom street, between 
Cambridge street and Vine street ; hearing Mon- 
day, March 29, 4 P. M. 

On the proposed extension ot Vernon street to 
Tremont street, to include the street known as 
Factory street, hearing Monday, April 5, 4 P. M. 

On the proposed extension of Concord street 
sewer to South Bay, and of Tremont street sewer 
from Newton to Lenox streets, hearing on Monday, 
March 29,4 P.M. 

On the proposed construction of a sewer through 
Dale, Hawthorne and other streets, hearing Mon- 
day, March 29, 4 P. M. 

Adjourned. 



76 



COMMON COUNCIL 



CITY OF BOSTON. 

Proceedings of the Common Council, 

MARCH 25, 1869. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Common 
Council was held this evening at 73£ o'clock, Wil- 
liam G. Harris, the President, in the chair. 

PAPERS FROM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

The petitions ot Solomon S. Cray and of the New 
England Female Medical College, were severally 
referred in concurrence. 

The order for the appointment of James K. 
Crowley as a culler ot hoops and staves, in place of 
Benjamin Ahbott, declined, was concurred in. 

The order authorizing the additional sum of 
$700 to be expended for heating apparatus lor the 
Lawrence School House, was referred to the Com- 
mittee on Public Instruction. 

The orders to set apart two lots of land, one be- 
tween JBerlin street and Madison place, and the 
other on Church street, between Fayette and 
Knox streets, tor primary school purposes; and to 
procure plans and estimates for primary school 
buildings to be erected on said lots, were read 
once. 

The order to refund to Tsaac Samuels the amount 
(with interest thereon) paid by him in 1861 for de- 
fective tax-titles on estates in Springer place and 
Eighth street, was read once. 

The following orders were each read twice and 
passed in concurrence: 

Order authorizing repairs on Engine House No. 
9, at an expense not exceeding $9500. 

Orders authorizing a hook and ladder house to 
be erected on Fourth street, at an expense not ex- 
ceeding $16,000, and for a loan of $10,000 to be ap- 
propriated therefor. 

The election of one First Assistant Assessor was 
taken up. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward Seven said it had been cir- 
culated here this evening that Mr. Tallonhad with- 
drawn his name as a candidate. That statement 
was not true, and Mr. Tallon is still a candidate. 

Mr. Judson of Waid Fourteen said it had also 
been circulated that Mr. Mcintosh had withdrawn 
his name as a candidate. That was a mistake ; tor 
he had not only not withdrawn his name, but had 
no thought ot such a thing. He hoped, therefore, 
that members of the Council would vote for his 
election. 

Messrs. Hobbs of Ward Fourteen, Lucas of Ward 
Seven, and Judson of Ward Fourteen, were ap- 
pointed a committee to receive, sort and count tho 
votes. Tbe committee reported as tollows : 

Whole number of votes 52 

Neceseary to a choice 27 

James H. Tallon 23 

Theophilus Burr 27 

Wm. H. Mcintosh 2 

Mr. Burr was declared to be elected, in non-con- 
currence. 

SALARY BILL. 

The Sa lary Bill was taken up, the question be- 
ing on adhering to certain amendments made by 
the Council, in which the Board ol Aldermen had 
non-concurred. 

Mr. Gray of Ward Twelve moved that the Coun- 
cil adhere to its former vote on all ot the amend- 
ments. 

Mr. Bich of Ward Fourteen called for a division 
of the question. 

Mr. Ingalls of Ward Twelve wished the motion 
for a division had not been made. The Council 
had voted twice for the amendments, and it would 
be undignified to continue to vote upon them. The 
proper course to pursue was to adhere and ap- 
point a Committee of Conference, which would 
save further trouble. 

The question was taken upon each of the 
amendments, relating to the salaries of the City 
Physician, the Superintendent of Faneuil Hall Mar- 
ket, the Deputy Superintendent of the Market, and 
the Chief Engineer of the Fire - Department. On 
each of them the Council voted to adhere. 



On the motion to appoint a Committee of Con- 
ference, the vote was 30 to 12. 

Messrs. Gray of Ward Twelve, Wells ot Ward 
Three, and Hall of Ward One, were appointed tne 
Committee of Conference on the part of the Coun- 
cil. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteen moved that an ordi- 
nance to amend an ordinance in relation to streets, 
printed City Document No. 24, 1869, be passed 
over to the next meeting, there being no im- 
mediate action required in regard to snow and 
ice. 

Mr. Ingalls of Ward Twelve moved that it be re - 
committed to the Committee on Ordinances, who 
would have a plenty of time for looking after the 
various provisions. That would be the fairest way 
to dispose of it. 

Mr. Keith accepted the motion as an amend- 
ment to his motion, and the ordinance was recom- 
mitted. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED. 

J.A.Tucker and others, that Chadwick street 
may be extended; L. F. Whiting and others, that 
Orchard park maybe graded and put in order; 
Boston Lead Company and others, that Albany 
street may be widened and extended. Severally 
sent up. 

Smith, Jacobs & Co. and others, that an alarm 
bell may be placed on the Novelty Works. Re- 
ferred to the Committee on Fire Alarms. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteen, from the Joint 
Standing Committee on Public Buildings, who 
were directed to consider the subject of ventilating 
the Council Chamber, having considered the sub- 
ject, submitted the following report : 

After examining the various systems of ventila- 
tion submitted to them, they are of the opinion 
that the one most likely to give satisfaction is that 
described in City Document Number 86 of 1868. 
Your committee have received a communica- 
tion from Mr. Luther Robinson, the agent 
of the United States Ventilation Company, 
in which he proposes to ventilate the Council 
Chamber in the manner described in the above 
mentioned document, for the sum of $1600, guaran- 
teeing a satisfactory result, and in case of failure, 
that no charge will be made, and they would 
recommend that they be authorized to contract 
with him on these terins. 

They would also ask to be authorized to ventilate 
the staircase hall and the corridors of the City Hall, 
by raising the skylights in the roof, and are of the 
opinion that should this be done, the ventilation 
of the entire building will be much improved. 
They therefore recommend the passage of the fol- 
lowing order: 

Ordered, That the Committee on Public Build- 
ings be authorized to contract with the United 
States Ventilation Company for the application of 
their system of ventilation to the Council Cham- 
ber ; and that they also be authorized to raise the 
skylights in the roof of City Hall, at an estimated 
cost of $2000, to be charged to the appropriation 
for public buildings. 

The order was read once. 

A suspension of the rules was moved, that the 
order may take its second reading at once, and be 
passed. 

Mr. Keith in explanation made some statements 
relative to the various measures taken last year in 
relation to the ventilation of the City Hall. The 
propositions from various parties varied in 
amount from $4900 to $30,000. Mr. Robinson's was 
the only one based on the proposition to do the 
work at his own risk, and not to claim any pay 
unless the ventilation should prove satisfactory. 

The proposition is renewed by Mr. Robinson, to 
ventilate the Council Chamber for $1600, on the 
same conditions, and if that shall prove satisfac- 
tory, he is willing to renew his entire offer of last 
year for the ventilation of the City Hall. 

The order was read again and passed. 

The following orders were also read a second 
time and passed : 

Order requesting the Mayor to petition the Gen- 
eral Court for authority to lay water pipes through 
Winthrop, across Shirley Gut, to Deer Island. 

Order authorizing an additional expenditure of 
five hundred dollars for repairing the boats and 
scows connected, with the,. steam dredging ma- 
chine. 



MARCH 



& 5 



18 6 9 



77 



NORMAL S0HO0LHOUSE. 

On motion of Mr. Keith the order authorizing 
the erection on Newton street of a Girls' High 
and Normal Schoolbouse, at a cost not exceeding 
$170,000, and authorizing a loan of $170,000 to be 
appropriated therefor, was taken from the table for 
consideration: 

Mr. Keith gave some information relative to the 
previous action of the Common Council on this 
subject. The subject had been under considera- 
tion for three years, and last year special attention 
was called to the matter. After long ana careful 
examination by the Committee on Public Instruc- 
tion and the Committee on Public Buildings, they 
were both unanimously of the opinion that the 
place selected was the most 'advantageous in ev- 
ery respect ior the purpose. The land is Arm, of a 
; good bottom, not requiring pile driving, the situ- 
ation is between two streets, with a church on one 
side, giving light on the four sides, and the means 
of access are of themost favorable character be- 
tween Tremontand Washington streets. 

In its location, it is about 18,000 feet from the 
centre of East Boston, 12,000 from Grove Hall, 
and about 8000 from the centre of South 
Boston, and is much more accessible than any 
point on the Back Bay lands. It has the unani- 
mous approval of both the Committee on Public 
Instruction and the Committee on Public Build- 
ings. Plans and estimates have been obtained, 
varying considerable in amount, the "difference 
in favor of the plan accepted on mason 
work being $35,000, It is believed these 
estimates are much more favorable than can be 
had two weeks hence. With the approbation of 
every committee, and the approval of the School 
Board, the order, should be passed at once. 
. Mr. Rich of Ward Fourteen said he wished to 
modify a statement made by him at the last meet- 
ing. The matter was not acted upon in the gen- 
eral committee, but it was referred to a sub-com- 
mittee with full powers, and it now comes on their 
action and recommendation. 

The order waspassed, yeas 43, nays 1— Frost. 

Mr. Emerson of Ward Six offered the following 
order-: 

Ordered, That $1500 be added to the appropria- 
tion heretofore authorized to be expended by the 
Committee on Printing, ior reporting and publish- 
ing in a daily paper the proceedings of the City 
Council during, the year ending July 1, 1869, 
said sum to be charged to the appropriation for 
printing. 

Mr. Flynn of "Ward Seven inquired it the order 
came from the Committee on Printing. 

The Chair replied that it did. 

Mr. Wadsworth of Ward Four asked for the rea- 
sons for voting for more money for this object. 

Mr. Nelson of Ward Nine stated that the eon- 
tract for the reporting and publication of the pro- 
ceedings of the City Council, was made by a com- 
mittee of the last Council, and the appropriation 
was based on the estimate that one column would 
he enough for the proceedings of each branch 
weekly. It had been found necessary by the great 
amount ot business of the City Council to make 
the reports very much longer, and this amount 
would be required to cover the expense. The 
Committee on Printing had so husbanded their re- 
sources that the amount of $30,000 appropriated 
for last year had not been all expended, and this 
sum would come out of that amount. 

Mr. Rich of Ward Fourteen was willing to allow 
this to go on until the appropriation was exhaust- 
ed, so long as it was nearly exhausted. All of 
the daily papers published the proceedings of the 
City Government to a sufficient extent, as much 
as their importance required, and there was not 
anything of so much interest as to warrant ex- 
tended reports. He hoped the order would not 
pass. 

A synopsis of the proceedings was as much as 
was generally read, and no one would care about 
reading long reports unless they have axes to 
grind. He would not have one paper paid for 
making reports so long that they will not be read. 
Let them all publish what they wish, and what 
they believe the public require. Beyond that it 
was not necessary to go. 

Mr. Nelson of Ward Nine said that so far as the 
publication was concerned, it met with much 
favor. The public could not know too much of 
what was done and said in the City Council. If 
such publications had been continued since the 



adoption of the cify charter, it would have been 
worth thousands of dollars. The publication met 
with universal expressions in its favor. It was 
now simply the carrying out of what the last City 
Council had contracted for. When the time comes 
lor a renewal of the contract, then the question 
may be considered whether it is expedient to con- 
tinue it. 

Mr. Rich inquired whether these full proceed- 
ings were published in a paper having the largest 
circulation. 

Mr. Nelson replied that these proceedings were 
published in a paper which reached as many resi- 
dents of Boston as any other paper. 

Mr. Pickering of Ward Fourteen •- said he hoped 
the publication of these proceedings will be con- 
tinued. He considered them to be valuatle to 
the public and interesting to the members them- 
selves. They went into the hands of the members 
of the City Council, and by readingthem over they 
come here with minds refreshed as to their pro- 
ceedings, and obtained a better knowledge of 
what was going on in each branch than they could 
have otherwise. 

Mr. Gray inquired if the printed sheets, con- 
taining the reports of the proceedings and debates, 
now furnished to members, would not stop, if the 
appropriation ceased. This question was an- 
swered by the member from Ward Nine in the 
affirmative. 

Mr. Rich made an inquiry relative to the reports 
which the members received, which appeared to 
him to be almost verbatim of those in the Tran- 
script. 

Mr. Nelson replied that they were the same. 

Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteen said the expediency 
of the matter was- not under consideration now. 
The City Government was bound by a contract 
made last year, which must be carried out. Be- 
yond that time the Council may determine its fu- 
ture action. 

W hen the matter first came up last year he was 
in serious doubt about the policy, but now he had 
no doubt about its wisdom and expediency. From 
these reports he derived great assistance, while 
from the old reports in the papers he received but 
little light. These reports were . literally a tran- 
script of the doings of the two branches, and 
showed the exact state of the business before 

• them. It was a small sum to pay, in consideration 
of the benefits to be derived. 

Many persons read the reports with great inter-, 
est and great care, and he believed that if submit- 
ted to the public the decision would be in their 
favor to a large extent. When petitions are pfe- 

• sented to the City Council,- the people can- learn 
what has become of them, to what committees 
they are referred, and when they can be heard on 
the subject. 

Mr. Wadsworth said that when he made his in^ 
quiry, it was ior information. He was satisfied on 
that point. A contract had been made for a speci- 
fic amount of space, and as reports had been much 
extended, the city woula be bound t vpay under 
the contract. 

Mr. Kich said if a contract was made for a year, 
it was not necessary that this order should be 
passed. The publishers of the paper had their le^ 
gal remedy and could secure their rights. He 
questioned the propriety of publishing these pro- 
ceedings iu a single paper. No paper should be 
preferred beyond another. If one was to be paid 
for the publication, so all of them should be. 

This order did not even specify that the pay 
should be continued in the same paper in which 
the proceedings had been published. If the com- 
mittee had made a contract, the city would be 
bound to pay it, but there was no evidence that 
there was a contract. Until it was shown that 
there was such a contract, he should not vote for 
the order. 

Mr. Jenks of Ward Three said he voted for the 
original appropriation, and if he had known that 
it would be larger he would have voted for an ad- 
ditional amount. He did not believe the commit- 
tee had made a contract which the city was 
not liable lor. If there had not been money 
enough appropriated.it should be given to them. 

The order was read again and passed. 

Mr. Nelson of Ward Nine, from the Committee 
on Printing, submitted the following order: 

Ordered. That the Joint Standing Committee on 
Printing be authorized to contract with the pro- 
prietors of the same daily and weekly papers now 
under contract to do the city advertising, for in- 



78 



COMMON COUNCIL. 



serting all tbe usual official advertisements of the 
City Government for one year lrom the 1st day of 
May, 1869, for a sum not exceeding $500 for each 
daily paper and $187 for each weekly paper, said 
sums to be charged to the appropriation for print- 
ing. 

uaily Papers— Advertiser, $500; Journal, $500: 
Post, $500; Transcript, $500; Traveller, $500— 
$2500. 

Weekly Papers— Gazette, $187; Express, $187; 
Courier, $187; Commonwealth, $187; Suffolk Coun- 
ty Journal, $187; Koxbury Gazette, $187; Pilot, 
$187 ; Times, $187— $1490. Making a total of daily 
and weekly papers of $3996. 

Mr. Nelson moved a suspension of the rules, for 
the passage of the order, for the reason that tbe 
existing contracts would soon expire. 

The rules were suspended and the order was 
read a second time and passed. 

CELEBRATION OF FOURTH OF JULY. 

On motion of Mr. Gray of "Ward Twelve, the or- 
der authorizing suitable arrangements to be made 
for the celebration of tbe ninety-third Anniver- 
sary of American Independence was taken from 
tbe table. 

Mr. Jenks of Ward Three moved the postpone- 
ment of the consideration of the order for four 
weeks. 

Mr. Judson of Ward Fourteen moved its post- 
ponement eight weeks. 

Mr. Gray said he had been assured by Mr. Bug- 
bee, Clerk of Committees, that the order should 
be passed at once, in order to give time for the 
orator of the day to prepare himself, and to make 
contracts for fireworks, &c. 

The amendment was lost. 

Mr. Jenks urged in support of his motion that be 
wished to secure as large a portion of the funds 
for the celebration out of the amount appropriated 
as possible, which could be done only by shorten- 
ing the time. If the committee should be as large 
as last year, the appropriation would be expended 
and a meaner entertainment afforded than a year 
ago, if that were possible. As to the necessity of 
time for preparation by the orator of the day, the 
subject had become so threadbare that the idea 
was preposterous. 

Mr. Hall cf Ward One, did not believe there 
would be too much time in which to make the nee-, 
essary arrangements. The expenditure would de- 
pend upon the character of the Committee, and 
not upon the length of time for the expenditures. 

The motion for postponement was lost, when the 
order was read a second time and passed. 

Mr. Rich moved that the Committee on the cele- 



bration of the 4th of July consist of one from each 
Ward, on the part of the Council. 

Mr. Jacobs of Ward Five stated that the Com- 
mittee would have a great deal to do, and that one 
from each ward would be too small. He moved 
that the number be two from each ward. 

Mr. Batchelder of Ward Four said that two from 
each ward would make nearly as many as last year, 
when the Committee was too large to work to ad- 
vantage. 

Mr. Wells of Ward Three said he was on the 
Coiiimittee last year, and did not find it too large. 

Tne motion to amend was lost— 15 to 23. 

Mr. Jenks moved to amend by making the num- 
ber eight, instead of fifteen. 

Mr. Osbornof Ward Six inquired how many were 
on the Committee from the other Board. 

The Chair stated that there were five. 

Mr. Wadsworth of Ward Four said that twenty 
in all would be large enough. 

Mr. Osborn said he would go still farther in the 
reduction of the committee, as a large one would 
be too cumbersome, and he hoped the amendment 
ot tbe gentleman from Ward Three would be 
adopted. 

Mr. Nelson of Ward Nine inquired why the com- 
mittee should be three times as numerous from 
this branch as from the other. 

Mr. Rich said he had no particular object in fix- 
ing the number, except that the Board of Alder- 
men had more than one-third of their number, 
and one from each Ward ot the Council would 
only give one-fourth. There was no reason why 
there should be an exact proportion. 

The Chair remarked that he should take the 
vote on the largest number first, and tbe motion 
to make the number one from each Ward was 
carried. 

Mr. Jenks inquired why a motion to amend by 
making the number smaller was not in order? 

The Chair stated that by the rules the question 
should be first taken on the larger number. 

The Committee was announced by the Chair, as 
follows : 

Ward One— Young; Two— Keany; Three — Bel- 
knap; Four— Talbot; Five— Flanders ; Six— Emer- 
son; Seven— Flynn; Eight— Bond; Nine— Leigh- 
ton; Ten— Butler; Eleven— Learnard; Twelve- 
Gray; Thirteen— Ryan; Fourteen — Hobbs; Fif- 
teen— Kingsbury. 

On motion, the President was added to the Com- 
mittee. 

An order was passed to pay bills for services 
rendered or materials furnished by persons con- 
nected directly or indirectly with the City Gov- 
ernment. 

Adjourned. 



79 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 
MARCH 29, 1869. 



The regular weekly meeting- of the Board of Al- 
dermen was held this afternoon at lour o'clock, 
Mayor ShurtlefT presiding. 

JURORS DRAWN. 

Thirty-six traverse jurors were drawn for the 
Superior Court for criminal business. 

APPOINTMENTS MADE AND CONFIRMED. 

Sergeant Edward Y. Graves, to he lieutenant of 
police. George F. Gould, to be sergeant of police. 

P. P. Pettis, special police officer, witnout pay, 
for duty at the moulding mill, corner of Merri- 
mac and Causeway streets. 

The nomination of Edmund H. Stevens, by the 
Port Physician, as his assistant, was also con- 
firmed. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

A.. D. Hodges and others, that Cliff street may 
be laid out as a public highway. 

George W. Fowle and others, for the extension 
of Lamartine street to Centre street. 

G. W. Blake and others, that Albany street may 
be extended to Warren street. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Streets. 

Charles F. A. Fey hi, for compensation for change 
of grade in liuggles street. 

Philip N. Colby and otheis, that the name of 
Taylor street be changed to Tiwight place. 

James H. Wilder and others, that Court street 
be changed to Cambridge street, from Sudbury 
street to Bowdoin square. 

Eucius B. Marsh and others, that the portion of 
Warren avenue between Pembroke and Newton 
streets be called Columbus avenue. 

Jewett & Pitcher, for a location under the act 
authorizing them to construct a railroad track at 
East Boston. 

E. S, Johnson, for the grading of Lenox street, 
east of Washington street. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Paving. 

Augustus Bacon, for leave to cut down a tree in 
front of No. 13 Auburn street. Referred to Com- 
mittee on Paving, with full powers. 

East Boston Ferry Co., for increase of tolls. 
Referred to Committe on Ferries. 

G. W. Tuckerman and others, for a sewer in F 
street, from Seventh to Eighth street. Referred 
to Committee on Sewers. 

Wm. H. Mill and others, against a wooden 
building No. 5 North Russell street, and request- 
ing its removal, as a nuisance. Referred to Com- 
mittee on the Fire Department. 

B.W.Carney, for license lor a bowling saloon 
at No. 672% Washington street. Referred" to Com- 
mittee on Licenses. 

Thomas C. Porter and others, for the use of 
Faneuil Hall, April 26. Keferred to the Committee 
on Faneuil Hal). 

John H. Bellamy & Co., that the city would 
adopt their apparatus for protection of hose across 
horse railroad tracks. Referred to Committee on 
Fire Department. 

George F. Kendall, for lease of Madison square 
tor ball-players, &c. Referred to Committee on 
Common and Public Squares. 

R. Anderson and others, for the grading of Ce- 
dar square. Referred to Committee on Common. 

C. F. Karcher, tor lenve to erect a stable on 
Eighth street. Referred to Committee on Health. 

Geo. W. Carnes & Co., Wm. G. Harris and 975 
others, mercantile houses, and of J. K. South- 
mayd & Co. and Geo. P. Davis and 53 others, mer- 
cantile houses, for a change in the ordinance re- 
specting projecting signs. Referred to Committee 
on Ordinances. 

J. J. Walworth & Co., Barnes, Merriam & Co., 
and 51 others, Hill & Wright, Brown & Lovell, and 
45 others, for the purchase by the city of the East 
Boston ferry property. Severally referred to the 
Joint Committee on Ferries. • 



NOTICES OF INTENTION TO BUILD. 

M. F. Wells, 37 North Margin street; Ignatius 
Enis, Chad wick street; E. Downing, south side of 
Shawmut place; N. D. Conant, east side of King 
street; Wm. Peard, No. 282 Fourth street; G. W. 
Holmes, Trenton street, between Brooks and Put- 
nam street s ; Faulkner & Clarke, Chauncy street, 
opposite Avon place; G. M. Gibson, Beacon street, 
between Fairfield and Gloucester streets ; Patrick 
J. Clark, 72 Meriimac street ; William C. 
Huntley, Liberty street, (Washington Village); 
Safford & Norton, 14 Myrtle street; W. F. 
Savaet , 71 Cambridge street; Daly Brothers, 
corner of Fourth and C streets; N. J. Brad- 
lee, coiner of Summer and Washington streets; 
Towne, Son & Co., Eaton and North Uussell 
streets; B. IT. ^landers, Federal street; 
Andrew Spence, corner of Dorchester and 
Eighth streets; Wrn. Smith, corner of Salem 
street and Bartlett place; W. B. Pickett, Maverick 
street, between Orleans and Bremen streets ; Chas. 
F. Karcher, Eiahth street, between Old Harbor 
and G streets ; Lawrence Leonard, 20 Charter 
street; Alden Frink, 144 Summer street; Mil- 
ler & Horfcon, Dorchester street, between Broad- 
way and Fourth streets. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Streets. 

HEARINGS ON ORDERS OF NOTICE. 

The several hearings on orciers of notice, on the 
petitions of William J. Irving and of N. J. Brad- 
lee, that the Board intenos to widen Cambridge 
street; on the proposed construction of a sewer 
in High street, between Federal and Summer 
streets ; for the construction ol a sewer through 
Dale, Hawthorne and other streets; for there- 
building of a sewer in Blossom street ; and of the 
extension ot the Concord street and Tremont 
street sewers, were caned up. No person xppear- 
ing in either case, the several report.-, were recom- 
mitted. 

The hearing on order of notice on petition of 
Badger & Batchelder, for leave to erect a steam 
engine in the building corner ol Cambridge and 
Charles streets, was taken up. 

Remonstrances were presented from E. H. 
Derby and others , and of surgeons of the Massa- 
chusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, against the erec- 
tion of such an engine, on the ground of being an 
annoyance to the residents on Charles street, and 
particularly so to the patients of the Infirmary, 
from the dangers of fire. 

Mr. Badger, one of the petitioners, stated the ob- 
ject of his petition, as that of simply replacing an 
engine which had been in operation in the build- 
ing for many years. The building in itself was 
sale, and was to be heated by steam. In the pro- 
posed manufacture of furniture, it was believed 
that the building would be much safer than it had 
bten. At present there were a large number of 
tenants, small manufacturers, and a planing mill, 
which made the building much more unsafe. 

The building had recently been purchased, and 
it was proposed to put the boiler in a fire-proof 
building, where there would be no risks from fire 
or other danger. In answer to Mr. Derby, Mr. 
Badger stated that the proposed engine was of 50 
horse power, while that of the former one was 35. 

Augustus Lowell objected in behalf of the Eye 
aud Ear Infirmary, where some four thousand pa- 
rents are treated annually, and to whom alarms 
of fire would often prove disastrous. Ir, was three 
years since the former engine was removed, and it 
was hoped for the safety of that institution that 
another would not be allowed to take its place. 

Mr. Brown, a resident in the vicinity, stated that 
the cinders, smoke and dust from that establish- 
ment had proved to be very annoying. The build- 
ing had been burned down once, and had been ou 
fire three or four times. In answer to Mr. B; dger, 
he said the burning was previous to the erection of 
the present buildings, and that the annoyance 
from Mason & Hamlin's establishment was net so 
great from being farther off. 

E. H. Derby, in behalf the residents and of the 
Eye and Ear Infirmary, objected on account of the 
danger and annoyance, and as there had been no 
engine in the building for three years, it was prop- 
er that the subject should be considered anew. 

Mr. Badger replied to some remarks about the 
annoyance of a saw mill, stating that there would 
be no sa.wing out of lumber, and no more sawing 
than in the general manufacture of furniture. 
The lumber used was already prepared for manu- 
facturing. The building was put up (or the purpose 



MARCH 9 9s 1869 



80 



of a manufactory, which was opposed as such at the 
time, had been used for that purpose, and would 
he valueless unless such use for it was continued. 
He could not see why objection should be made 
to an engine in this building while that in the Ma- 
son & Hamlin manufactory was continued. 

Mr. Lowell further objected, remarking that it 
was of ro consequence whether an engine former- 
ly was there or not. The public good required that 
no further use of such an engine should be per- 
mitted in the building. In regard to the danger 
to the Infirmary, the buildirg joined 't closely, 
and endangered it and its inmates in case of fire. 

The report was recommitted with the remon- 
strances. 

The order of notice on petition of the American 
Steam Gauge Co., lor leave to erect a steam en- 
gine at No. 5 Lindall street, was taken up. No 
person objecting, the report was recommitted. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

The following orders were read a second time 
and passed. 

Order authorizing the Committee on the Jail to 
make a new ceilhig in the rotunda of that building, 
ana to make such additional repairs as may be re- 
quired, at an estimated expeuse of $4900, to be 
charged to the appropriation for the county of 
Suffolk. 

Order authorizing the Committee on. Bells and 
Clocks to place a new clock in the tower of Phil- 
lips Church, South Uoston, at an expense not ex- 
ceeding $625, to be charged to appropriation for 
bells and clocks. 

Order for the widening of Bennett avenue, by 
taking 1390 square feet of land of persons un- 
known, on Bennet avenue, Prince street, and 
Nortn Bennet street; 818 square feet of land be- 
longing to'the heirs of Joshua Bennet ; 322 square 
feet of land belonging to the heirs of Mary Thayer; 
315 square feet of land belonging to Moses P. Bick- 
ford ; 1542 square feel of land belonging 10 David 
Flynn, making a total of 11,051^ square feet, at an 
expense ot $11,051 50. 

Order authorizing the Committee on the Jail to 
put up a telegraph wire between the Court House 
in Court square and the County Jail in North 
Charles street, and connect therewith the neces- 
sary apparatus for transmitting messages between 
the two buildings, the expense thereof not ex- 
ceeding $600, to be charged to the appropriation 
for the county of Suffolk. 

COMMON COUNCIL PAPERS. 

The several petitions. from the Common Council, 
of J. A. Tucker and others, and of th° Boston 
Lead Company, were referred to the Committee 
on Streets j that of L. P. Whiting and others, to 
the Committee on Paving. 

Aldermen Kichards, Jam^s and Talbot were, 
joined to the Committee of Conference on the dif- 
ferences relative to the salaries of City Physician, 
Superintendent and Deputy-Superintendent of 
Faneuil Hall Market, and Chief Engineer of Fire 
Department. 

The election of one First Assistant Assessor was 
taken up, the result ot the balloting being as fol- 
lows: 

Whole number of votes 12 

Necessarvto a choice 7 

James H. Tallon 8 

Theophilus Burr 3 

Chas. F. Grant 1 

Mr. Tallon was again declared to be elected, in 
non-concurrence. 

The reference to Committee on Public Instruc- 
tion of order to provide $700 for heating apparatus 
in Lawrence School, being on concurrence, 

Alderman Kichards said the Council evidently 
acted from a misapprehension of the facts of the 
case. If there had iieen any doubts in the matter, 
the reference should have been to the Committee 
on Public Buildings. Last summer, on a rep- 
resentation that new apparatus was needed in the 
Lawrence School building, an appropriation was 
passed of $2000, which was believed to be all that 
was required. It was found subsequently that the 
old pipes had given out and new pipes were ac- 
cordingly put in. 

The money was spent judiciously and for neces- 
sary purposes, and it was found that $700 more 
would be required to meet the expense. If there 
had been any doubts in the minds of the members 
of the Council, the information might have been 
obtained from the Committee on Public Buildings, 
whom he supposed were sufficiently posted in the 



matter. He hoped the Board would non-concur 
in the reference, and on its return to the Common 
Council statements would be made which would 
prove to be satisfactory. 

A motion to non-concur was carried. 

The ordinance relating to ice and snow in streets 
of this city was recommitted to Committee on 
Ordinances in concurrence. 

The following orders were passed in concur- 
rence: 

Order to expend $500 on boats and scows belong- 
ing to the dredging machine. 

Order to erect a schoolhouse for normal school 
on Newton ■street, at a cost of $170,000, and author- 
izing a loan therefor. 

Order to appropriate an additional amount of 
$1500 lor reporting proceedings of City Council. 

Order for selection ot certain papers for city 
advertising. 

Order to pay bills of certain members of the 
City Government. 

The order tor ventilation of the Common Coun- 
cil room, was considered. 

Alderman Pratt said he had no objection to the 
ventilation of the Common Council room, but 
would have liked the order better had it included 
the loom of the Board of Aldermen. 

Alderman Talbot inquired if the report tame 
from the Joint Committee on Public Buildings? 

Alderman Richards replied that it was consid- 
ered in joint committee. It was believed to be 
best to try the experiment in tne Council chamber 
and of ventilating the staircase hall and corridors 
by raising the skylight. If successful, the experi- 
ment would be tried in the room of the Board of Al- 
dermen, which would be benefited simply by the 
ventilation above it. 

The order was passed in concurrence. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Alderman Van Nostrand, from the Committee to 
Nominate candidates for Second Assistant Asses- 
sors, made a report, which was accepted and sent 
down, and Monday next was assigned for an elec- 
tion. 

The nominations were as follows : 

*Ward 1— Daniel J. Sweeny, John Noble. *Waid 
2— James Healy, John F. Flynn. Ward 3 — Briggs 
Mann. *Ward 4 — F. S. Carrutu, C. W. Foibusn. 
*Ward 5— lohn M. Maguire, John A. Daly. Ward 
6— Oliver P. Bowman. Ward 7— Charles S. Blood. 
Ward 8— B. T. Remick. Ward 9— Horace Jenkins. 
Ward 10— Frederick G. Pope. Ward 11— Geo. W. 
Skinner, Ward 12— Thomas Hill. Ward 13— Geo. 
F.Davis. Ward 11— Wm. II. Mcintosh. Warll5 
— S. Parkman Blake. [Wards marked thus * are 
entitled to two Second Assistants,] 

Alderman White, from the Committee on Li- 
censes, reported a large number of licenses to inn- 
holders and victuallers; also licenses to three 
newsboy&, several wagon licenses, the transfer of 
a wagon license, and the transfer of stalls 65 and 
67 Faneuil Hall Market and ol cellar .No. 11. Sev- 
erally accepted. 

Alderman White also reported leave to with- 
draw on petition of James Benson, Jr., No. 112 
Cambridge street, John Murphy, Nos. 70 and 72 
Dedhain street, and A. W. Worcester, No. 5 Green 
street. Severally accepted. 

Alderman Talbot, lrom the Committee on Street, 
reported no action necessary on sundry notices of 
intention to build. Accepted. 

Also leave to withdraw on petition of M. D. 
Ross and others, for a change in the direction ot 
Atlantic avenue, and of Hay ward P. Cushing and 
others, in aid of the same. Severally accepted. 

AldermanWhite, from the Committee on Health, 
reported favorably on petitions of Leander H. 
Jones and of Orsamus Nute, for leave to sprinkle 
streets. Accepted. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on Claims, 
to whom was referred the petition ot Mary Strat- 
ton, to be compensated for personal injuries re- 
ceived by falling on the sidewalk in Tremont street ; 
also, on petition of Maria O'Malley, to be compen- 
sated for personal injuries by a fall on Harrison 
avenue ; of Jeremiah McCarthy, to be compensa- 
ted for injuries received by his son, on account of 
an alleged dpfect in Thacher street, reported that 
they severally have leave to withdraw. Accepted. 

Alderman Uichards, from the Committee on 
Public Buildings, reported in favor of the elec- 
tion of a stabie' for hook and Ladder House, and 
from a special committee, for the purchase of fire 
annihilators, to be placed in engine, hose and sta- 
ion houses. The orders were read once 



81 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



TRUSTEE OF CITY HOSPITAL. 

Alderman Bradlee submitted a communication 
from the Trustees of the City Hospital, informing 
the Board of a vacancy in the Board of Trustees, 
occasioned by the death of Jonas Ball, elected for 
three years. 

The Board proceeded to an election, when David 
H . Coolidge was unanimously chosen to fill the 
vacancy. 

BRANCH RAILROAD. 

Alderman James submitted thefollowmg orders, 
which were passed : 

Ordered, That the act passed by the General 
Court of Massachusetts of 1869, entitled an act to 
authorize Nathaniel M. Jewett and others to build 
a branch railroad track in East Boston, be and the 
same is hereby accepted. 

Ordered, That the following rules be prescribed 
for the construction of the said railroad track in 
East Boston. 

1. The rail to be used in the construction of the 
tracks shall be made of rolled iron, and shall weigh 
not less than ninety pounds to the lineal yard, and 
be similar to the pattern deposited in the office of 
the Superintendent of Streets for the construction 
of the tracks of the Marginal Freight .Railway 
Company. 

2. The space between the rails and three feet on 
each side thereof shall be paved witn granite or 
trap-rock blocks, of such size and quality as the 
Superintendent of Streets shall direct. 

3. The whole work of constructing said tracks 
shall be done to the satisfaction ot the Committee 
on Paving and the Superintendent of Streets, and 
shall be approved by them. 

ORDERS OF NOTICE. 

Orders ot notice were adopted as follows : 

On the petition of Win. Pray, for a stable for 
more than four horses in Woodward street, bear- 
ing Monday, April 5, 4 P. M. 

On the proposed laying out of Knox street, be- 
tween Eagle and Condor streets, hearing Monday, 
Apiill2, 4 P. M. 

On the notice of John C. Crowley of intention to 
build on Bedford street, that the Board intends to 
widen said street, hearing Monday, April 12, 4 
P.M. 

On the extension of Kevere street, west of 
Charles street, hearing Monday, April 12, 4 P. M. 

On tne proposed widening of Broad street, at the 
beginning of Atlantic avenue, hearing Monday, 
April 12, 4 P. M. 

ORDERS PASSED. 

On motion of Alderman Fairbanks : 

Ordered, That the sum of $18 34 be and the same 



as hereby abated from the assessment levied upon 
Levi Wilkins for a sewer in Kendall street. 

On motion of Alderman Richards: 

Ordered, That tne Chief Engineer of the Fire 
Department be and he is hereby authorized to have 
Engine No. 12 repaired at an expense not exceed- 
ing $1000, the same to be charged to the appropria 
tion for the Fire Department. 

Ordered, That the Committee on Ordinances be 
requested to prepare and report for the considera- 
tion of the City Council an ordinance to establish 
the office of Assistant City Clerk, under the 
authority of chapter 72 of the acts of 1869. 

On motion ot Alderman James : 

Ordered, That the use of the lot of land belong- 
ing to the city, on Dartmouth street and St. James 
avenue, be granted to the Directors of the pro- 
posed Musical Festival, lor the purpose ^f erecting 
a suitable building thereon in which to hold said 
festival. 

On motion of Alderman Talbot, the order to 
change name of Avon place to Avon street, with 
an amendment to extend the name ot Avon street 
through Temple place to Tremont street; also, 
remonstrance of Sweetser & Abbott and others 
against the same, were taken from the table. 

Alderman Talbot moved that the amendment be 
adopted. 

Alderman Richards inquired if it would not be 
proper first to read the remonstrance? 

The Mayor stated that it had once been read. 

Alderman Talbot, in support of the amendment, 
said it would not be desirable to have two names 
for the continuous street; that it could not be 
called Temple street, a street which already exist- 
ed; that the name Avon street would be a pretty 
name ; and that, although there might be some in- 
conveniences for a time, the occupants of Temple 
place would soon become accustomed to the new 
name. He was willing, however, to have the mat • 
ter recommitted and hear the parties. 

Alderman Richards said he did not require that 
the parties should have a hearing. The matter 
was considered in the committee, who thought 
that the occupants of Temple place would soon 
wish to have the name changed to Avon street, 
when people became familiar with the new streetl 
It would be superfluous to take any action to re- 
commit, when the matter was virtually settled. 
There would be inconveniences of new numbers 
for awhile, but that would soon be got over. 

The amendment was adopted and the order, as 
amended, was passed. 

On motion of Alderman Hawes, the election of 
City Engineer was taken up. 

N. Henry Crafts was unanimously reelected. 

Adjourned. 



82 



COMMON COUNCIL 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 

APRIL 1, 1869. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Common 
Council was held this evening at 7 y z o'cIock, Wil- 
iam G. Harris, the President, in the chair. 

PAPERS FKOM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

The several petitions relating to the purchase of 
the East Boston Ferry property, and those asking 
lor a change in the ordinance respecting oroject- 
ing signs, were referred in concurrence. 

Messrs. Wadsworth of Ward Four, Noves of 
Ward Five, and Woods of Ward Twelve", were 
joined to the Committee on the petition of the 
Boston Labor Ketorm Institute, that the eight- 
hour system be adopted in all departments of city 
work. 

The following reports were severally accepted, 
in concurrence : 

Report leave to withdraw on the petition of Ma- 
ria O Malley, to be compensated for injuries from 
a fall in Harrison avenue. 

Keport leave to withdraw on the petition of 
Mary Stratton, to be compensated for injuries re- 
ceived by falling on Tremont street. 

Report leave to withdraw on petition ot Jere- 
miah McCarthy, to be compensated for injuries 
received by bis son from a fall on Thacher street. 

The following orders were passed in concur- 
rence: 

Order granting to the Directors of the proposed 
Musical Festival the city lot on Dartmouth street 
and St. James Avenue, tor the purpose of erect- 
ing thereon a suitable building m which to hold 
said Festival . 

Order for Committee on Ordinances to report 
an ordinance for appointment of Assistant City 
Clerk. 

The resolve and order to lay out and widen Ben- 
net avenue, at a cost of §11,051 50, was taken up. 

A motion was made by Mr. '^ray of Ward Twelve 
to refer the order to the Committee on Streets. 

Mr. Wadsworth of Ward Four moved to amend 
by instructing the Committee to give the remon- 
strants a hearing. 

Mr. Hall of Ward One wished to know if the mo- 
tion included the parties on both sides. 

Mr. Wadsworth replied that it was designed to 
include any one who wished to be heard. 

Mr. Keith of Ward fifteen suggested that it 
should apply to all parties in interest. 

The suggestion was accepted as an amendment, 
and as amended the reference was made, and the 
Committee were so instructed. 

ELECTION OF AN ASSISTANT ASSESSOR. 

The election of one First Assistant Assessor was 
taken up. 

Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteen said this disagree- 
ment between the two branches bad been going 
on for some time, and it was desirable it should be 
closed. It must be quite apparent that Mr. Burr 
could not be elected by the Board, and that Mr. 
Tallon could not be elected by this branch. He 
hoped, therefore, that both the candidates would 
be dropped, and that Charles E. Grant would be 
taken up, to allow the election of another member 
from the Highlands. Mr. Grant served very ac- 
ceptably as an Assessor last year. 

Mr. Batchelderof Ward Four read a communi- 
cation from Theophilus Burr, requesting that his 
name be withdrawn as a candidate. 

Messrs. Snow of Ward Eleven, .Nelson of Ward 
Nine, and Daniels of Ward Four, were appointed a 
committee to receive, sort and count the votes. 

The Committee reported as follows : 

Whole number of votes 47 

Necessary to a choice 24 

Charles E. Grant 29 

James H. Tallon 16 

Wm. H. Mcintosh 2 

Mr. Grant was declared to be elected in non-con- 
currence. 



ELECTION OF CITY ENGINEER. 

The election of City Engineer was taken up, 
when Messrs. Batchelder of Ward Four, Rogers 
of Ward Filteen, and Tucker of Ward Six, were 
appointed a committee to receive, sort and count 
votes. The committee reported the whole num- 
ber to be 44, of which there were 42 for N. Henry 
Cratts and 2 tor George P. Darrow. 

Mr. Crafts was declared to be elected in concur- 
rence. 

ELECTION OF TRUSTEE OF CITY HOSPITAL. 

A. communication from the President of Trustees 
of the City Hospital, announcing a vacancy in 
their Board, caused by the decease of Jonas Ball, 
Esq., was read, with the action of the Board of 
Aldermen in lilling the vacancy. 

Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteen inquired if the sub- 
ject of filling the vacancy had been referred to a 
Committee of the City Council. 

The Chair stated that it had not. 

Mr. Keith moved its reference to the Committee 
on the Hospital. 

The vote was declared to be in the negative, and 
a doubt was expressed. 

Mr. Keith commenced to speak, when Mr. Os- 
born of Ward Six raised a question of order, that 
debate was out of order, pending the solving of a 
doubt. 

The Chair decided that the point of order was 
well taken. Mr. Keith asked leave to speak. The 
Chair stated that if no objection was made, the 
gentleman could proceed. 

No objection being interposed, Mr. Keith said 
that this was the first instance within his knowl- 
edge in which the practice was departed from in 
referring the question of vacancies in office to a 
committee. The gentleman elected by the other 
branch may be a most fitting candidate. If so, 
the committee would report in his favor, and it 
would be perfectly proper to elect him. The ac- 
tion in pi bceeding to an election without such a 
reference was taking it out of the hands of the 
committee. 

Mr. Richards of Ward Eight stated that Mr. 
Coolidge was a member of the Board of Trustees 
two years ago, his term being for one year. On 
its being proposed a year ago to nominate him for 
reelection, it was suggested that there ought to be 
some one on the Board from the Highlands*. Mr. 
Coolidge waiveei his claims, and having once given 
way, it was highly proper that he should now be 
reelected. The motion to reler was lost by a vote 
of 10 to 20. 

Messrs. Jenks of Ward Three, Conant of Ward 
Fifteen, and Talbot of Ward Four, were appointed 
a committee to receive, sort and count the votes. 
The committee reported as follows : 

Whole number of votes 46 

Necessary to a choice 24 

David H. Coolidge 43 

S. D. Crane 2, D. Eeavitt 1 3 

Mr. Coolidge was declared to be elected in con- 
currence. 

The report nominating Second Assistant Asses- 
sors was accepted, in concurrence. 

Mr. Wells of Ward Three moved that Thursday 
evening, April 15, 8K o'clock, be assigned for the 
election of Second Assistant Assessors. 

Mr. Rich of Ward Fourteen inquired if the stat- 
ute did not require that the election should be 
within sixty days from the first Monday in Feb- 
ruary. 

The Chair stated that the City Council having 
entered upon the election by appointing a commit- 
tee to make nominations, and that committee hav- 
ing made a report, the requirement was met. 

Mr. Rich stated that the language of the statute 
was "shall be elected." 

The motion to assign was carried. 

The question of non-concurrence of the Board 
of Aldermen, in reference to Committee on Pub- 
lic Instruction, of order authorizing the addition- 
al sum of $700 to be expended for heating appara- 
ratus for the Lawrence Sehoolhouse, coming up, 

Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteen explained the request 
for an additional appropriation, and made a'state- 
ment of the facts connected with the subject. 
When the apparatus was put in last year it was 
found necessary to put in new radiating pipes, not 
previously contemplated, and this was done at an 
expense designated in this order. The school had 
to be suspended for the purpose. The money had 
already been expended for the purpose he had de- 



APRIL 1, 186 9. 



83 



scribed. It was unnecessary to refer the matter 
to the Committee on Public Instruction, and he 
hoped the Council would recede from its former 
action, and that the order would be passed. 

A motion to recede was carried, and the order 
was passed. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

The following orders were each read a second 
time and passed : 

Order lo refund to Isaac Samuels the amount 
(with interest thereon) paid by him in 1861 lor ae- 
fcctive tax-titles on estates in Springer place and 
Eighth street. 

Orders to set apart two lots of land, one between 
Berlin street and Madison place, and the other on 
Church street, between Fayette and Knox streets. 
lor primary-school purposes ; and to procure plans 
and estimates for primary-school buildings to be 
erected on said lots. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Mr. Tucker of Ward Six, from the Committee on 
the Fire Department of the Common Council, to 
whom was referred the order requesting the Co- 
chituate W ater Board to introduce the Lowry hy- 
drants in the Church Street District, made a re- 
port that in their opinion the Lowry hydrants 
sbould be connected with the mains at the inter- 
section of streets in the Church Street District, as 
an adequate supply of water cannot be obtained 
in case of lire from tbe hydrants which are set in 
tee sidewalks, and known as the "Boston hy- 
drant." J 

In narrow streets it may be impracticable to use 
the Lowry hydrants during a portion of the year, 
and in order to give the Water Board an opportu- 
nity to exercise their judgment as to the localities 
where they may be properly introduced, the Com- 
mittee would recommend that the accompanying 
order be substituted for the order referred to 
them. 

Ordered, That the Cochituate Water Board be 
requested to attach the Lowry hydrants to the 
pipes which are being laid down in the Church 
street district at such points at the intersection of 
streets as they may deem practicable and expe- 
dient. 

The report was accepted, aad the order was 
passed. 

SALARY BILL. 

Mr. Gray of Ward Twelve from the Committee 
of the Common Council appointed to confer 
with such a committee as the Board of Alder- 
men nrght appoint, on the matters of dif- 
ference between the two branches relative to the 
salary bill, made a report that they have conferred 
with a committee of the Board of Aldermen and 
have agreed to make the following recommenda- 
tions, viz: 

That the salary of the City Physician should he 
fixed at one thousand five hundred dollars per an- 
num. 

That the salary of the Superintendent of Faneuil 
Hall Market should be fixed at two thousand two 
hundred dollars per annum. 

That the salary of the Deputy Superintendent of 
Faneuil Hall Market should be fixed at one thou- 
sand three hundred dollars per annum. 

That the salary of the Chief Engineer of the Fire 
Department should be fixed at three thousand 
dollars per annum. 

The report was accepted. 

The question was taken separately on the prop- 
ositions, which were severally adopted alter voting 
to recede on the amendments to the two first 
named. 

Mr. Snow of Ward Eleven inquired the position 
of the question relative to the salary of the Deputy 
Superintendant of the Market. 

Mr. Gray stated that the original report fixed 
the salary at $1200, which was increased to $1500 
hv the Council, and now the committee agreed 
upon $1300. 



The question on the salary ot the Chief Engi- 
neer of the Fire Department was put, upon adher- 
ing, which was carried. 

In reply to a question of Mr. Snow, the Chair 
reulied that in voting to recede on the two first 
named, the Council concurred with the Board of 
Aldermen. 

Mr. Woolley of Ward One, from the Joint Stand- 
ing Committee on Public Institutions, to wbom 
was referred the petition of the Managers of the 
Discharged Soldiers' Home, for an appropriation 
to repair the almshouse in the Highland District, 
made a report recommending that the petition be 
referred to the Committee on Public Buildings. 

The report was accepted. 

ORDERS PASSED. 

On motion of Mr. Batchelder of Ward Four, it 
was 

Ordered, That the bill of Sidney Squires & 
Co., amounting to $1331, for materials fur- 
nished, having been approved and allowed, be 
paid. 

Mr. Wells of Ward Three presented a request 
signed oy several members of the Common Coun- 
cil, that the City Messenger supply the new mem- 
bers of the Council with badges. 

The request was modified to a motion that the 
City Messenger be directed to procure badees lor 
those members of the Council who have not re- 
ceived them. 

Mr. Rich of Ward Fourteen did not think the 
passage of such an order to be necessary, provision 
having already been made for that purpose. 

Mr. Wadsworth of Ward Four said the City Mes- 
senger bad already been authorized to procure 
badges for new members and moved to lay the 
motion on the table. Lost, 13 to 18. 

The Chair suggested that the motion be made in 
writing, in the form ot an order, but would put the 
question. 

The motion was stated to be, that members not 
supplied with badges, be supplied by the City 
Messenger. 

Mr. Batchelder of Ward Four inquired if new 
members had not been supplied. 

Mr. Wells replied that when the term of office 
expired, they were no longer members, and that 
all members must be new members. 

Mr. Snow of Ward Eleven said he owed an apol- 
ogy to the Council for having once said that all 
members were new members. He hoped this mo- 
tion would be voted down, so that badges shall be 
furnished only to those who were not members 
last year, and have not received them. It was not 
the intention to furnish badges to those who ire 
already supplied. 

Mr. Hopkins moved an indefinite postponement 
of the motion. Carried by a vote of 21 to ti. 

Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteeen offered the follow- 
ing order: 

Ordered, That the Committee on Public Build- 
ings be authorized to contract with Wm. H. Bm- 
erson lor painting the Girls' High and Normal 
Schoolhouse, he being the lowest bidder there- 
for. 

Mr. Wadsworth of Ward Four wished to know if 
the order referred to the present schoolhouse in 
Mason street, or to the new one to be built. 

The order was again read, as an answer to the 
inquiry, and was passed. 

Mr. Batchelder of Ward Four moved that when 
the Council adjourn, it be to Tnursday evening, 
April 15. Carried. 

Mr. Wadsworth asked to be excused from serv- 
ing on the committee relative to eight hours' la- 
bor for city employes. Refused. 

PETITION. 

A petition was presented from Perkins & 
Jacques, to be released from conditions on certain 
lands. Referred to Committee on Public Lands. 



Adjourned to Thursday, April 15. 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



84 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 
APR'i.L 5, 1869. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Board of Al- 
dermen was held this aiternoon, at four o'clock, 
Mayor Shurtleff presiding. 

APPOINTMENTS MADE AND CONFIRMED. 

Coal Weighers and Measurers of Wood and Baric. 
Robert Hale, J. B. Quimby, Charles Darrow, H. F 
Lawrence, Caleb W. Hartshorn, Stanley C. Burn- 
ham, Geo. M. Cook, Win. Jordan, Randall G. 
Morse. 

Weighers of Coal Only. Geo. M. Winsiow, Iff- 
natius A. Kelly, Charles H. Pratt, J. C. Crafts. Geo. 
v. Emery, Samuel dosea, Jr., Algernon A. Curtis 
Wm. B. Tarleton, Edwin Y. Brown. ' 

Special Police Officers With.ul Pay. Channing 
W. Littlefleld,tor duty at Boston Velocipede Kink, 
onTremont street; George Atwood, for duty at 
Parker Buildirg, Washington street; Ethan K. 
Cheney, for duty at South Baptist Church; George 
M.B.Rowe, for duty at Boston Lunatic Hospital. 

Members of the Fire Department. John M. Colby 
as a member of Hose Company, Ko. G; John H 
Weston, Foreman of Hose Company No. 6 ; Xhos 
E. Golding, member of Hose Company No. 1. 

Secretary of Board of Engineers. Henry W 
Longley, nominated by the Board of Engineers of 
the Fire Department, as the*r Secretary, was 
unanimously elected by the Board of Aldermen. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

Peter Wainwright and others, that the name of 
Messinger street be changed to Brimmer street. 

J. E. & N. Brown and others, that the name of 
Highland place be changed to Parker Hill avenue. 

i! . F. Raymond and others, that Cross street be 
repaved from Hanover to North streets. 

Seveially referred to the Committee on Paving. 

Frost & Co., for leave to erect a stable for more 
than four horses on Stanhope street. 

Daniel Hefternin, for leave to build a stable for 
more than tour horses at 153 Albany street. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Health. 

William C. Lord, for leave to exhibit velocipedes 
on the Common. 

Referred to Committee on the Common. 

John Homans, for a sewer in M street, between 
Fifth and Sixth streets. 

Elisha Noyes and others, that a sewer be built 
through Ward street. 

John S. Blair and others, for a sewer in Har- 
rison avenue, south of Dover street. 

Foster & Leighton, for a sewer in Monmouth 
street. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Sewers. 

F. W. Lincoln, Jr., and others, in aid of the peti- 
tion of Co. A, 1st Cavalry, for better armory ac- 
commodations. Reierred to Committee on Armo- 
ries. 

George B. Upton and others, in aid of the peti- 
tion of Charles Burrill, for settlement of claims 
against the city. Laid ou the table. 

Dennis Collins, surrendering his Fort Hill es- 
tates to the city. Referred to the Committee on 
Streets. 

Johanna Donovan, for an apple-stand on Wash- 
ington street, near the Old South Church. Refer- 
red to the Committee on Licenses. 

Metropolitan Railroad Company, for a temporary 
location on Berkeley street. Referred to toe Com- 
mittee on Paving, and an order ot notice issued 
thereon. 

CONSULTING PHYSICIANS. 

A communication was received from Drs. John 
Jeffries, Henry G. Clark, Winsiow Lewis, v. 
Humphrey Storer and Charles E. Buckingham, 
resigning their offices as consulting physicians. 
The resignations were accepted, and the commu- 
nication was referred to the Committee on Nomi- 
nations of Consulting Physicians. 



NOTICES OF INTENTION TO BUILD. 

-i/' S vi?- U,ger ' corner °t' Sullivan and Lark streets • 
Mrs. Witshire, G55 Washington strpet ; Frank 
Jones, Vinton street; T. J. Whidden Bromfied 
street; Wm Goldsmith, 39 Prenfes s?reet? Small 
& Post, Brooklme street between Shawmut ave- 
n t Ue ? n £ i r . emont street; also at 113.5 Washington 
street; SStillings,Appleton street, between Berke- 
ley and Clarendon streets; D. S. Johnson, Warren 
«H e ^ e; p J0 K hn .^ Roberts, 223 and 225 Cambridge 
street Robert Moore, rear 62 Endicott Street; fi. 
S. & G. N. Miller, corner of Chandler and Claren- 
don streets ; Jos. W. Tucker, Lambert street- 
Slade Luther, 10 Poplar street; Thomas Keves B 
street, between Broadway and Atkins street: Wil- 
liam Saundeis, Seventh street, between F and 
Dorchester streets ; Andrew Abbott, 116 Friend 
street: N. J. Bradlee, 61 and 66 State street- 

s F treet ne T r t ^'Z*™^ ,^4? Devoffik 
stieet; J. E. & N. Brown, 41 to 51 High street- 31 
to 36 Purchase street, and 57 Devonshire street'. 

QUARTERLY REPORTS. 

Quarterly reports were made as follows: 
Superintendent of Streets. Expended and charged 
to the appropriation tor paving during the quarter 
for grading and repairs of streets and for remov- 
ing and levelling snow and ice on the streets in 
the city proper, South and East Boston and Rox- 
bury, the sum of $15,691 65. There were bills 
lodged with tbe City Treasurer, during the same 
M™' 4? r e °P stones - * idewalks,&c., amounting 
to $4399 47. The amount paid into the Citv Treas- 
ury during the same period, ana credited to the 
paving department, was $3619 94. 
Superintendent, ■/ Health. There has been ex- 

s^a^aSoTs? for tbe quaner endin S 

_ The removal of snow ana ice, scraping and clean- 
ing the streets, the removal of ashe! and offal 
abating nmsances, &c, $70,025 30. ' 

Dunands against sundry persons, the bills for 
which have been deposited with the City Treasur- 
f, r f « r . + co ".ection, $14,366 94. Amount paid into 

L^^h c e t s a erT2•s %^™* 4«~ 

Number of prisoners conveyed from the several 
station houses to city lock-up under the Court 
tot°al S 22&7! &ll0WS: Males > 1678 5 females, 609; 

Superintendent ot Public Lands. The 'ales of land 
under the direction of the Committee on Public 
Lands for the quarter were as follows • 

One lot on Wareham street, containing 15.580U 
square feet at 87^ cents per 'foot, $13,038 19 one 
lot on Fourth street 6250 feet, at GO cents, $3750; 
SSr?J. r.-? Hampshire street, 4000 feet, 50 cents 

f !nin ; £° e J°L 0n ^ IeS , C0tt ^ aee 'I 3il ,ee * 75 cents 
$4010 32; strip of land on Northfleld street 52 feet 
$300. Total 31,235 61-100 feet, $23,698 5L ' ' 

Of the foregoing amount there has been received 
lncash and paid over to the Treasurer $2647 51, 
and there has been taken in bonds from the nur- 
fntTre^tj2i a 05i e ^ lliDe amiUal instalm ents with 

The Superintendent has also received and paid 
over to the Treasurer for rent of land on South 
Bay, Dover street and Harrison avenue, $267 08. 

ihe expenditures have been as follows- 

Amount paid for filling in land oetween Albany 
street and Harrison avenue, $3233 50; salary of 
?™E^\ n n 1 ? ,1 £ jnt '^ 60; ex P««e for Committee of 
1868 $108; Committee of 1869 $105 25; stationery, 
$16 50; printing, $3 15; total, $3916 40. 

Report of Paymaster for Soldiers' Relief. The 
quarterly report of Reuben Peterson, Jr pay- 
master of Soldiers' Reliei Committee, gave the 
jollowing result: b 

Balance on hand Jan. 1 gjj^ 

Received from City Treasurer at various 

times during three months 25 500 

Disbursed to disabled soldiers and sailo-s * 25 ' 914 
and their families 25 750 

Leaving a balance on hand April l....$io4 oo 

The number of applicants in January was llf.o- 

February, 1278: March. 1385. The disbursements 

W s e ,^' 1 "r, Jan l lal ^'' $88U7; Fcor uary, «HI90; March. 

$8093. The total amount for the several Wards 
was as follows : 

„, Wi \ rd I' '* m4 i War(l '■*< $2588: Ward 3, 81605- 
Ward 4, $1027; Ward 5, $2512; Ward 6, $708; Ward 



85 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN, 



7, $3655; 'Ward 8, $1606; Ward 9, $830; Ward 10, 
$1323; Ward 11, $1158; Ward 12, $1278; Wards 13, 
14 and 15, $3494; out of State regiments, $802; U. 
S. Navy, $1130. Total, $25,750. 

Inspector itf Lighters. For the quarter ending 
March 31, 1869, the fees received amounted to 
$514 75. The expenses of office for rent for the 
same time are $38 18; leaving tLe net income to 
be divided, 8170 57. The net income has been 
divided by the incumbents. 

Sealer of Weights and Measures. Northern Dis- 
trict—Receipts lor the quarter, $305 11. 

Southern District— Receipts for the quarter, 
$358 t2. 

These reports were severally accepted and or- 
dered to be placed on file. 

ANNUAL REPOBT OF THE INSPECTOB OF MILK. 

The tenth annual report of Henry Faxon, In- 
spector of Milk, was presented. The inspector 
states that the milk trade of Boston is divided into 
two branches, for which separate sets of books are 
kept at the office of the Inspector. Wholesale 
dealers, are those who distribute to families, 
stores, &c, from carriages, and those persons who 
keep more than one cow, in the city proper, Bos- 
ton Highlands, South and East Boston. Ketail 
dealers are those who sell in small quantities from 
market places, stores, shops and cellars. The 
dealers in the Highland District have been regis- 
tered and are included in this report. 

The number of cows kept within the limits of 
the city is 713— city proper, 31; Highlands, 435; 
South Boston, 105; Fast Boston, 139. Number who 
keep one cow, 177. Wholesale dealers recorded 
since last report, 123 ; whole number registered, 
981; now in business, 368; numDer selling from 
carriages, 225; small wholesale dealers who keep 
more than one cow and sell to the neighborhood, 
143 ; retailers recorded since last report, 251 ; whole 
number recorded, 2655; samples of milk inspected 
since last report, 1630; number not adulterated ; 
1153; more or less adulterated, 477; cases analyzed 
by chemist, 10; average amount of adulteration, 
40 6-10 ; largest amount of adulteration in lOOparts, 
53.49; least, 15.14; cases pending in the courts, at 
date of last report, 2, one of which was acquitted, 
and the other absconded. 

The number of complaints made to the Grand 
Jury have been 7. on which 4 bills of indictment 
were found ; 2 have been convicted in the Superior 
Court, and 2 are now pending; 1 convicted in the 
Municipal Court. 

The number of gallons of milk for the daily sup- 
ply of this city is 19,686; daily cost to consumers, 
$6299 52; gallons for year's supply, 7,185,390, 
which cost to consumers $2,299,324 80. 

For violations of the law theie have been paid in 
lines and costs $48 15. The expenses of the office, 
for analysis, records, stationery, &c, have been 
$216 53. 

The Inspector states that his whole time and at- 
tention have been given to the duties of his office. 
After quoting: irom his report of last year, he re- 
fers to the supply during the several months last 
season, purchased at about the rates of the pre- 
vious year. In April the supply was abundant; 
assuming the standard of pure extra milk to be 20 
and good milk at 19, the standard ot the latter for 
the Highlands was 18%. In May, the supply was 
more than equal to the demand, and the standard 
about the same. The supply continued to be large 
until towards the close of July, when an inspec- 
tion of a large number of cans showed the milk to 
have been skimmed or largely extended. The 
standard had now fallen in t»e city to 17 and below. 
By the middle of August, the supply was larger, 
and the last of the month more limited, and the 
price advanced. 

The average standard of milk m September was 
17%. In October the winter contracts commenc- 
ed, at 40 to 50 cents a can at the farmer's door : at 
the cars in the city, 50 to 60 cents; delivered to 
stores and shops, 60 to 72 cents ; and retailed at 9 
cents per quart. The average standard of the 
month was 18%, and in November, 18, with an 
abundant supply. The supply was less in Decem- 
ber, much of it greatly injured by frequent freez- 
ing and thawing, and from being several days old. 
The average standard was 17%. In January the 
standard was 18; in February, 18% ; in March, 18%. 

The Inspector refers to the act of the Legisla- 
ture of last year, and its Inefficiency, from the 
'lifficulty of showing that the dealers sold adulter- 
ated milk, knowing the same to be adulterated, 
and Irom artifices resorted to by families and deal- 



ers to screen their milkm-m from punishment. In 
many cases it is proved that milk is adulterated 
alter it leaves the hands of the milkmen, for the 
purpose of making it hold out. 

In reply to the question, what constitutes a good 
milk route in Boston? it is answered, milk from 
the best dairies, the number of cans daily deliv- 
ered, the class of customers, the number of cans 
left at a. i.v one place, and the purity of the milk 
when delivered. 

We have now in this city two hundred and 
twentv-five milk routes, divided into three classes. 
The nrsc are considered by their owners to be 
worth from $6000 to $10,000, with horses, carriages, 
three hundred milk cans, an interest in milk pits, 
ice houses, &c. These routes distribute from sev- 
enty to one hundred cans of milk daily, to our 
first-class public houses, dining saloons, large 
groceries, and some of them to a few private fam- 
ilies. These places seldom require the services of 
the Inspector. They are able and willing to pay 
the highest market price for good milk, which 
they generally receive. Routes of this class do 
not often change hands, and many of them have 
been conducted by the same men for the past ten 
or twelve years. 

The second class are sold at from $3000 to $6000, 
varying in price according to the numnerof cans dis- 
tributed and the class of customers. These extend 
their milk as circumstances may seem to require. 
To this class belong many of the milkmen from 
the neighboring towns, who bring in daily from 
twenty-five to forty-five cans each. Many of them 
brin»' in good milk and supply some of the most 
particular families, while others extend their milk 
from 25 to 33 per cent. Some of these routes olten 
change hands. 

The third class routes are sold irequently at 
from $1000 to $3000, using from twenty-five to forty 
cans of milk daily, which is distributed to small 
shops and poor families, many of whom care but 
little as to the quality of the milk, provided they 
can obtain a low priced article. These dealers 
generally undersell other milkmen and entice 
away their customers, and the standard of their 
milk is found to be a fair index to their general 
character. During this year twelve or more new 
routes have been commenced of this class. 

The Inspector, referring to the milk of cows kept 
in the city and fed on brewers' grains, remarks that 
in all our large cities it is safer and better to feed 
infants on desiccated milk, diluted to its original 
consistency, than to feed them on the impure or 
extended article sold as milk. This milk, like 
sugar, dissolves better in warm than in cold wa- 
ter. One pound will make thiee quarts ol (rood 
milk. For tea, coffee or chocolate it can be put on 
the table and used as sugar, but should be allowed 
to dissolve m the cup a moment before being 
stirred, as the erearn globules will then remain 
unbroken. For young children, a tablespoonful 
dissolved in a teacupful of water is sufficient ; tor 
older children and invalids the proportion must 
he regulated by circumstances and the taste and 
judginent. 

This article, the Inspector says, he recommends 
only as as a sutstitute where pure, fresh milk can- 
not be obtained, and even this may be adulterated. 
In conclusion, the Inspector expresses his ac- 
knowledgments to Dr. James C. White, chemist, 
lor his ready and valuable services ; also to all 
others who have interested themselves in the ob- 
jects of his department. 

The report was laid on the table and ordered to 
be printed. 

HEARINGS ON ORDERS OF NOTICE. 

The hearing on the order of notice on petition of 
William Fray, for leave to erect a stable on Wood- 
ward street ior more than four horses, was taken 
up. No person appearing, the report was recom- 
mitted. 

The hearing on the order of notice on the pro- 
posed extension of Vernon street to Tremont 
street was taken up. No person appearing, the 
report was recommitted. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

The following orders were read a second time 
and passed: 

Ordered, That Congress street be widened at the 
corner of Milk street, by taking a parcel of land 
belonging to Levi L. Tower, containing 320 square 
feet, more or less, at an expense of $7350. 

Ordered, That the Committee on Public Build- 
ings be authorized to build a stable in the rear of 



APRIL 



o 



18 6 9. 



86 



Hook and Ladder House No. 1, and to make such 
alteration and repairs on the present building as 
may be deemed uece-sary, at an estimated cost of 
f 6600, to be charged to the appropriation for Pub- 
lic Buildings. 

Ordered, That the Chief Engineer of the Fire 
Department be authorized to purchase, under the 
direction of the Committee on the Fire Drpart- 
ment, one of tne American Consolidated Compa- 
ny a * ire Annihilators tor e.-,ch of the police sta- 
tions, and the Engine, Hose and Hook and Ladder 
houses in ihe city, the expense, not exceeding 
$2000, to be charged to the Appropriation for the 
Fire Department. 

Ordered, That the Committee on Country Ac- 
counts be and they are hereby authorized to em- 
ploy some suitable person to prepare the classified 
indices to the Suffolk deeds for 1869, the expense 
to be charged to the appropriation for the Country 
of Suffolk. 

COBIMON COT7NCIL PAPERS. 

Petitions from the Common Council were re- 
ferred in concurrence. 

ELECTION OP AN ASSISTANT ASSESSOR. 

The election of one First Assistant Assessor was 
taken up. 

Alderman Baldwin stated that he was au- 
thorized to withdraw the name of James U. Tallon 
in favor ot Chas.E. Grant. 

A ballot was tr.ken, when it appeared that all of 
•he votes were cast lor Chas. E. Grant. 

Mr. Grant was declared to be elected, in c on- 
currence. 

The following orders were passed in concur- 
rence: 

Order for location ot Lowry Hydrants on Church 
Street District— amended by limiting the location 
to the intersections of the streets. 

Order to pay bill of S. Squires, amounting to 
$1334. 

Order aothorizing contract with W. H. Emerson, 
to paint Girls' Normal Schoolhouse. 

The report of Committee on Public Institutions, 
referring subject of using Roxbury Almshouse for 
a Soldiers' Home to Committee on Public Build- 
ings, was concurred in. 

The action of the Common Council in relation to 
the salaries of City Physician, Superintendent of 
Faneuil Hall Market, Deputv Superintendent of 
the Market, and Chief Engineer of the Fire De- 
partment, was taken up. 

Alderman Richards, from the Committee of 
Conference, made a report on the subject of the 
disagreements between the two branches, when 
the report of the Committee of Conference was 
accepted, in concurrence. 

ELECTION OF SECOND ASSISTANT ASSESSORS. 

The special assignment, the Election of Second 
Assistant Assessors, was taken up. The balloting 
resulted as follows : 

Whole number of ballots 12; necessary for a 
choice 7. 

*Ward 1— Daniel J. Sweeney, John Noble, 11 
each. 

*Ward 2 — James Healey, John F. Flynn, 11 each. 

"Ward 3— Briggs Mann, 6; E. C. Donnelly, 4; Jos. 
Allen 2. 

*Ward4-F. S. Carruth, 8, E. Stone Goodwin, 
10; C. W. Forbush, 2; Benjamin T. Gould, 2. 

*Ward 5— Jonn M. Maguire, 9; John A. Daley, 
11; Pierce A. Doherty,4. 

Ward 0— Oliver P. Bowman, 11. 

Ward 7— John A. Johnston, 7 ; Chas. S. Blood, 5. 

Ward 8— Cadis B. Boyce, 7 ; B.J. Kemick, 5. 

Ward 9 — Horace Jenkins, 6; James Standish, 2; 
Henry A. Davis, 3. 

Ward 10— Frederick G. Pope, 11 ; E. A. Hunting, 1. 

Warn 11— George W. Skinner, 11. 

Ward 12— Tuomas Hill, 8; William Gallagher, 3. 

Ward 13— George F.Davis, 5; Alexander Stuart, 
5; J. J. Fox, 2. 

Ward 14— Wm. H. Mcintosh, 11. 

Ward 15— S. Paikman Blake, 11. 

In Wards 3, 9 and 13 there appeared to be no 
choice. 

Ward 3— Second ballot, Briggs Mann elected, by 
a votes of 8 to 3 for E. C. Donnelly, and 1 for Jos. 
Allen. 

Ward 9— Second ballot, Horace Jenkins. 4 ; Jas. 
Standish,6; H. A. Davis, 2. Third ballot, Jenkins, 

* Entitled to two Second Assistants. 



5; Standish, 6; Davis, 1. Fourth ballot— whole 
number, 11; necessary for a choice, 6 ; Jenkins, 6 ; 
Standish, 5. 

Ward 13— Second ballot, Geo. F. Davis, 7; Alex- 
ander Stuart, 4; J. J. Fox, 1. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Alderman White, from the Committee on Li- 
censes, reported ninety-tnree licenses for victual- 
lers, sixteen for innholders, several tor billiards 
and bowling saloons, four for newsboys, three for 
boot blacks and one tor selling lamp mats. Sev- 
erally accepted. 

Alderman White also reported several wagon 
licenses, and tor the transfer of wagon licenses. 
Accepted. 

t The same committee reported in favor cf a. 
license to S. G. Derry, for a velocipede school at 
the Skating Rtnk, and leave to withdraw on the 
petitions of Eliza Freeman, Thos. A. Bannon and 
John P. valley, for licenses as victuallers. 
SeveraMy accepted. 

Alderman James, from the Committee on Pav- 
ing, reported leave to withdraw on the petition of 
E. S. Johnson, for the grading ot Lenox street, 
east of Washington street, that street not being a 
public street; also leave to withdraw on petition 
ot Philip N. Colby and others, for a change of the 
name of Taylor street to Dwight place. Severally- 
accepted. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on Streets, 
reported no action necessary on sundry notices of 
intention to build. Accepted. 

Alderman Fairbanks, from the Committee on 
Sewers, reported leave to withdraw on petition of 
Joel E. Gilman, for abatement of an assessment 
for a sewer in London street. Accepted. 

ORDERS OF NOTICE. 

On petiton of C. F. Karcher for leave to erect a 
stable on Eighth street, near Old Harbor. Hearing 
Monday, April 12th, 4 P. M. 

On propospd construction of a sewer on F street, 
between Seventh and Eighth streets. Hearing 
Monday, April 12th, 4 P. M. 

On the proposed laying out of Rockville place. 
Hearing Monday, April 19th, 4 P. M. 

On the laying out, widening, extending, and 
grading of Mount Warren avenue. Hearing 
Monday, April 19th, 4 P. M. 

On the petition of the Metropolitan Kailroad 
Company for a temporary track on Berkeley street. 
Hearing Monday, April 1,9th, 4 P. M. 

On the petition of Smith & Lovett for leave to 
put a steam engine in No. 127 Albany street. Hear- 
ing Monday, April 26th, 4 P. M. 

AVON STREET BETTERMENTS. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on 
Streets, reported an order which was passed, as- 
sessing betterments upon the estates of heirs of 
Wm. Marshall, Dexter N. Kichards, Edward E. 
Tower, N. J. Bradlee and another, trustees, Char- 
lotte Morgan, Richard Fletcher, Chas. C. Foster, 
heirs of Mary Sigourney, Mortimer C. Ferris, Sec- 
ond Church, Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic 
Association, Elizabeth A. Cushing, George Gard- 
ner, E. W. Gurney, heirs of Joseph H. Thayer, H. 
W. Suter and N. J. Bradlee trustees, heirs of Ben.i'. 
Dearborn, heirs ot Enoch Hale, Wm. T. Andrews, 
Abigail Armstrong and Francis L. Higginson'. 
The whole amount of land upon which better- 
ments were assessed was 35,080 feet, amount of 
betterments adjudged, §122,705 50— one half of 
which $61,382 75 is assessed upon the estates of 
the above named owners. 

ORDERS PASSED. 

Aldeiman James, from the Committee on Paving, 
on the petition of J. J. Munroe and others, and 
James Sturgis and others, that Walnut avenue be 
widened at the Haskins estate, reported the fol- 
lowing order, which was read twice and passed. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be 
directed to remove the rocks. &c. projecting irom 
the Haskins estate into Waluut avenue, and to 
grade said avenue to the established line, at an es- 
timated cost of $1300. 

On motion of Alderman Talbot, 

Ordered, That the order passed December 31, 
1808, apportioning the betterment of $087, assessed 
upon the estate of Jonathan Jones, No. 15 Bowkor 
street, into three equal parts, be and the same 
hereby is rescinded, tlie "aid Jones having since 
elected to pay the said betterment in full. 



87 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



On motion of Alderman James, 

Ordered, Ihat the City Treasurer he and he is 
hereby directed to abate the the sum of .$141 26 
from the bill assessed upon Nathaniel McKay for 
sidewalks laid in front of vacant land on Lexing- 
ton street, corner of Marion street, said McKay 
not being the owner of said land. 

On motion of Alderman James, the following 
orders were passed : 

Ordered, That the Committee on Common and 
Public Squares be authorized to purchase addi- 
tional seats for the Common and Public Garden, 
at an expense not exceeding $2000, to be charged 
to the appropriation for the Common. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Common 
and Squares be authorized, under the direction of 
the Committee on the Common, to make a flower 
border in the Public Garden, along the line of the 
path parallel witn Boylston street, at a cost not 
exceeding $2000, said amount to be charged to the 
appropriation lor Common, &c. 

On motion ot Alderman White, 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Health be 
and he is hereby instrutced to deliver to William 
Seaver ( Boston Highlands), one hundred loads of 
ashes, more or less, and that a charge of fifty eents 
per load therefor be made. 

Ordered, That the Committee on Health be and 
they are bereby authorized to visit New York for 
the purpose of obtaining general information for 
the Health Department, and that the sum of $500 
be appropriated for said use and charged to ap- 
propriation for health. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Health be 
directed to enforce the provision of section 52 of 
the Health Ordinances, and for that purpose that 
he be directed to issue a limited number of li- 
censes to such persons as the Committee on 
Health shall approve, to remove grease, bones, or 
refuse substances (except house offal), from cel- 
lars, stores and houses in this city, upon such 
terms and conditions as the Committee on Health 
shall deem necessary; provided, that the fee to be 
paid for any such license shall not exceed one dol- 
lar. 

On motion of Alderman Seaver, 

Ordered, That the Committee on Bridges be au- 



thorized to represent this Board before the Com- 
missioners appointed under the act passed in 1868, 
entitled "An Act relating to Charles river and 
Warren bridges." 

Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor be and he is 
hereby authorized to quit claim to the heirs of 
Thomas Tileston, all right which the city may pos- 
sess of draining through their land between Pur- 
chase, and Broad streets, in consideration of the 
payment by said heirs ol the cost of diverting said 
dram. 

Oidered, That the Chief of Police be directed to 
notiiy the owners and abutters on Tremont street, 
between Camden and Kuggles streets, to furnish 
edgestones and lay sidewalks with brick, within 
twenty days. 

Ordered, That the Chief of Police he directed to 
notify owners and abutters on Shawmut avenue, 
between Arnold and Washington streets; also 
owners and abutters on Cabot street, between 
Tremont and Kuggles streets; also owners and 
abutters on Seventh street, between Seventh and 
Dorchester streets, to furnish edgestones and lay 
sidewalks with brick; also owners and abutters 
on Harrison avenue, between Northampton and 
Eustis streets ; on Northampton street, between 
Harrison avenue and Hampden stieets, and on 
Hampden street, between Northampton and Dud- 
ley streets, to furnish edgestones and lay side- 
walks. - 

Alderman Hawes offered the following order: 

Ordered, That the Harbor Master be authorized 
to appoint an assistant, subject to the approval of 
the Mayor, to take charge of the channel of the 
Koxbury canal, and to control the anchorage of all 
vessels in said canal; and that the Committee on 
the Harbor be requested to fix the compensation 
of said officer. 

Alderman Talbot inquired if the Superintend- 
ent of Dover street bridge did not act in the capac- 
ity ot Assistant Harbor Master, in keeping the 
cnannel clear, as indicated. 

Alderman Seaver replied that he did so act, but 
that he wanted compensation for su2h services. 

The order was laid over. 

Adjourned. 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



88 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 
APRIL 12, 1869. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Board of Al- 
dermen was held this afternoon, at four o'clock, 
Mayor ShurtlefT presiding. 

APPOINTMENTS MADE AND CONFIRMED. 

Weighers of Coa£— Jasper H. Eaton, <4eorge S. 
J. Crasse ; the last also measurer of wood. 

Special Police Officers without pay — Crawford 
Daggett, Stephen'?, Lynch, W. E. P. Veazie, Ar- 
temas Reed, H. A. Skinner, for duty at the Fitch- 
burg Railroad Station. 

Stephen Coleman and William H. Maloon, for 
duly at the Charity Building, Chardon street. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

Walter S. Robinson and others, that Williams 
street be repaved. 

Hasket Derby, that Pinckney street, west of 
Biiinmer street, begraded, and a fence placed at 
the end of said street. 

Jobn A. Carnes and others against the proposed 
change of grade in Curve street. 

Sewall, Day & Co , and others, that Tremont 
street be paved with granite blocks from Lenox 
street to the railroad crossing. 

Job A. Turner and others, against the change in 
the name of Court street to Cambridge street. 

Jewett & Pitcher and others, for a revised 
grade of Eagle street. 

Andrew Murray and others, ledge cutters, for 
increase of pay. 

S. G. Howe, that Fifth street be graded between 
G and H streets. 

Severallv referred to Committee on Paving. 

WilliamH. Gregerson, for a drain in Mt. Pleas- 
ant avenue. 

Howard A. Doe, for a sewer in D street, near the 
Old Colony Railroad, 

Atherton T. Brown and others, that the Win- 
thfop street sewer be extended to Cleveland 

Robert Wright and others, that, the Shawmut 
avenue sewer be extended to Madison street. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Sewers. 

C. B. Snyder and others, lor lamps on Parker 
street, near the Western avenue. Referred to the 
Comm'ttee on Lamps. 

Owen Sawn, for leave to sprinkle the streets in 
Boston Highlands. 

William Manning, for abatement of assessment 
for a sewer in Orange court, constructed to abate 
a nuisance. 

Severally referred to Committee on Health. 

George M. King, for compensation for injuries 
done to a hack. Referred to tne Committee on 
Claims. r _. , ', '-' ' 

Engineer and firemen of Boston Highlands, for 
a fire alarm bell on the Lewis Schoolhouse. 

George L. Pike and others, that the alarm bell 
on St. Vincent Orphan Asylum be removed to the 
Everett Schoolhouse. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Fire 
Alarms. 

NOTICES OF IKTENTION TO BUILD. 

H. F. Hathaway, corner of Fourth and O streets ; 
R. Bishop, corner oi Federal and Swan streets; 
also, on Broadway, between B and C streets ; Law- 
rence Morant, Longwood avenue, near Parker 
street; P. H. Rogers, Parker street, between 
Smith and Conant streets; N. J. Bradlee, Nos. 59 
to 69 Hanover street, corner of Elm street; C. K. 
Kerby, 3G Hancock street; A. Lent, 235 Third 
street; E. B. Rich, cornerof K and Eighth streers ; 
J. S. Jenks, Eagle street, between Putnam and 
Knox streets; David Scott, Eagle street, between 
Putnam and Knox streets ; Jewett & Pitcher, cor- 
ner ot Eagle and Knox streets ; F. W. Pitcher, 
Eagle street, between Putnam and Knox streets; 
D. W. Titcomb, 95 Pleasant street ; D. Damon, Me- 
ridian street; Daniel Murphy, 19 Rochester street; 
Thos. Bryant, Gold street; John Gallagher, 
Hampshire street; Edwin Hale, Gates street, 



between Telegraph and Dorchester street; T. 
J. Wbidden, 62 Congress street; Baxter & 
Vinal, Shawmut avenue, between Oakland 
and Thornton streets;'!. J. Whidden, corner ot 
Chapman and Emerald streets; H. A. Sharp, Ev- 
erett, between Cottage and Orleans streets; Tol- 
man & Hunting, Columbus avenue; D. H. Jacobs, 
23 Eliot street ; H.M. vVilson, 18 Boylston street; 
W. E. Blanchard, corner of St. James avenue and 
Clarendon street; George E. Clark, Rogers street; 
John L. Noyes, Pitts street; Lewis Williams, coro- 
ner of Phillips and Anderson streets, Samuel A. 
Way, Harrison avenue, front Castle street to Oiv 
ange lane; Wm. Sayward, Newton and Pembroke 
streets, and Fourth between Dorchester and £ 
streets; Wm. Denin, P street, between First and 
Second streets; J. O. Mason, 1 Pembertpn square; 
Ira A. Medbury, Gold street, between F and Dor- 
chester streets; Alden Avery, Sterling street, be- 
tween Shawmut avenue and Westminster street. 
Severally referred to the Committee on Streets, 

QUARTERLY REPORT OF CHIEF OF POLICE. 

The quarterly report of the Chiet of Police for 
the quarter ending March 31, exhibited the follow- 
ing statistics : 

Arrests. 4958; males, 3824; (emales, 1134; Ameri- 
cans, 1240; foreigners, 3718; non-residents, 953; 
minors, 1036; committed, 3436; lodgers, 10,810; 
males, 9514; female's, 96; Americans," 6889; non- 
residents, 8887 ; minors, 1766. The lock-ups show 
commitments, 2800; males, 2101; females, 699; 
foreigners, 1694; Americans, 1106. 

Amount of property taken irom prisoners and 
lodgers, which was restored as per' receipts, $12,- 
959 68; amount of property reported stolen, $G1,- 
223; stolen property recovered, $59,777 80; fines 
imposed, $11,559 01; witness fees earned, $2894 6!; 
days spent in Court, 1954}£ ; aggregate imprison- 
ment imposed, 273 year,? 7 months; number of lar- 
cenies in station, 456; arrests in same, 382. 

The principal causes lor arrests were— assault 
and battery, 319; felonious assaults, 41; breaking 
and entering and larceny, 67 ; common drunkards, 
111; drunkenness, 2125; disturbing the peace, 167; 
disorderly, 642; gaming on the Lords day, 38 ^ 
keeping houses of ill-fame, 30; larceny, 234; felo- 
nious larceny, 100; night-walkers, 84; suspicious 
persons, 310; suspicion ot larceny, 76; truants, 42; 
violation of city ordinances, 67; vagabonds, 80; 
witnesses, 61 ; murder, 2; manslaughter, 2. 

Under the.head "miscellaneous" there were re- 
ported— accidents, 114; arrested on warrants, 145; 
buildings found open and seoired, 523 ; boats chal- 
lenged, 785; cases investigated, 227; defective 
lamps, 4473; disturbances suppressed, 1744; extra 
duty done by officers, 419; lire alarms given, 58; 
fires extinguished without alarm, 33; injured per- 
sons provided lor, 42; intoxicated persons helped 
home, 334; lost children. 109; streets and side- 
walks reported and repaired, 992 ; street obstruc- 
tions removed, 7411; vessels boarded, 187; water 
running to waste, 55. 

Laid on the table and ordered to be printed. 

Other quarterly reports were made, as follows : 

Truant Officers' Report. Number of cases inves- 
tigated during the quarter, 3225; number lound to 
be truants, 140; aggregate absences by truancy, 
617; sentenced to House of Reformation, 20; to, 
State Reform School, 4; to School Ship, 4; to In- 
dustrial School for girls, 5. 

Hay Weigher— North Scales. Receipts for the 
quarter, $706 42, torty per cent, of which, $282 56, 
less expenses, $75 01, making $207 55, has been 
paid to the City Treasurer. 

HEARINGS ON OKDEBS OF NOTICE. 

The hearings on the several orders of notice, on 
the proposed construction of a sewer in F street, 
between Seventh and Eighth streets; on the peti- 
tion ot C. F. Karcher for leave to erect a stable on 
Eighth street, near Old Harbor; on the proposed 
laying out of Knox street, between Eagle and 
Condor streets ; on the proposed widening of Bed- 
ford street, and on the extension of Revere street 
west of Charles street, were taken up. No person 
appearing in either case, the reports were recom- 
mitted. 

The hearing on the order of notice on the pro- 
posed widening of Broad street, at tho beginuiug 
of Atlantic avenue, was taken up. 

A remonstrance was presented against said wi- 
dening from A. C. Wheelwright, President of the 
Board of Proprietors of Rowe's wharf. 

The report was recommitted wtrh the said re- 
monstrance. 



89 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



AUDITOR'S MONTHLY EXHIBIT. 

The Monthly Exhibit of the Auditor was laid be- 
fore the Board, in print, presenting an exhibit of 
the general and special appropriations for the 
present financial year of 1&G8-G9, as shown in the 
hooks in his office, April 1, 1809, including the 
April Draft, being twelve months' payment of the 
financial year, exhibiting the original appropria- 
tions, the amount expended, and the balances of 
each unexpended at that date. 

The balances unexpended will hav? to meet the 
payments of interest and premium oe the city 
and water debt, the requisitions of t i county 
courts, and the sjiecial drafts drawn da.- :_;• the 
month of April. 

The recapitulation showed the following re- 
suits : 

Appropriations, 



Revenues, etc. 



Expended. Unexpended. 



General .. $7,138,652 93 $6,427,801 50 $711,05137 
Special... 5,096,9-1182 S,09G,258 86 2.61)0,682 96 



§12,835,79175 $9,521,060 42 $3,311,734 33 
Kead and accepted, and sent down. 

PEACE FESTIVAL. 

The following communication was presented by 
Alderman White: 

Boston, April in, 1S69. 
To His Honor the Mayor, and the City Council of the 
City of Boston :' 

The undersigned, the executive committee on 
the subject ot the National Peace Juoilee, teg- 
leave to represent that, through the liberality of 
certain citizens of Boston, a sufficient sum of 
inouey has bee J . subscribed to guarantee the pe- 
cuniary success of the Mus : .cal Festival in June 
next ; and the committee are well sal ished that the 
artisiic success of the enterprise is no less well as- 
sured. The interest of all classes in this commu- 
nity in the success of the undertaking is too man- 
ifest to need pointing out. 

On such occasions, heretofore, it has been the 
policy of the City Government of Boston, as rep- 
resenting all the citizens, to tender the hospitali- 
ties of the city to distinguished National and State 
officers and men eminent in literature, art, aud 
science. 

Satisfied that you will take such action in the 
present instance as will be in keeping with the 
ancient fame of the city for hospitality, the under- 
signed simply desire to call your attention thus 
officially to the assured completion of the enter- 
prise, and leave in your bands the whole matter of 
the reception and entertainment of the distin- 
guished personages who may honor us with their 
presence. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Alexander H. Rice, 
E. D. Jordan, 
J. Bardwell, 
Oliver Ditson, 
Geo. H. Davis, 
M. M. Ballou, 
Frank VVrisley, 
H. Harris. 
On motion of Alderman White, the communica- 
tion was referred to the Committee on the Peace 
Jubilee, and the chairman of the Board, Alderman 
.lames, was added to the committee. 

unfinished business. 

The following orders were read a second time 
and passed: 

Order directing the Superintendent of Sewers to 
construct a sewer in Blossom strpet, between Cam- 
bridge and Vine streets, and to report a schedule 
of the expense thereof, pursuant to law. 

Order directing the Superintendent of Sewers to 
construct a sewer in High street, between Federal 
ana bummer streets, and report the expense there- 
of. 

Order directing the Superintendent of sewers to 
construct a sewer in Dale, Hawthorn, Oakland, 
Thornton and Cedar streets, and through land of 
Dabney and others and of Charles Hulbert, and re- 
port the expense thereof. 

Order to pay heirs of Solomon Piper fifty thou- 
sand dollars for land taken and damages occa- 
sioned by the widening of Federal street, under 
resolve of June 6, 18C8, to be charged to Federal 
street loan. 

Ordered, That the Harbor Master be authorized 
to appoint an assistant, subject to the approval of 
the Mayor, to take charge of the channel of the 



Boxbury canal, and to control the anchorage of all 
vessels in said canal; and that the Committee on 
the Harbor be requested to fix the compensation 
of said officer. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Alderman White, from the Committee on Licen- 
ses, reported sundry licenses to innholders, vict- 
uallers, for intelligence offices, the transfer of hack 
licenses, &c. Severally accepted, 

Alderman White also reported in favor of the 
petition of Henry J. Megan, lor have to give a 
concert in Franklin Hall, and of John I. Uidgway 
for a Velocipede Bink atNo. 7 North Bussell street. 
Severally accepted. 

Also leave to withdraw on petition of Joanna 
Donovan for an apple stand on Washington street ; 
and of Alberto Ncerini for a license as victualler, 
116 Cambridge street. Severally accepted. 

Alderman White, from the Committee on 
Health, reported that leave be granted to William 
Pray to erect a stable on Woodward street for more 
than four horses ; also, to Daniel H . Heff'ernin to 
erect a stable lor more than four horses at No. 153 
Albany street. Severally accepted. 

The same Committee reported favorably on the 
bond of Ceo. vV . Forristall, Superintendent of 
Health, which was accepted and the bond was ap- 
proved. 

Alderman Hawes, from the Committee on Steam 
Engines, reported in favor of granting the petition 
ot i he American Steam Gauge Company for leave 
to put up a steam engine at No. 5 Eindall street. 
Accepted. 

Alderman Hawes, from the same Committee, on 
the petition of Badger & flaichelder, for leave to 
erect a steam engine in the building corner of 
Cambridge and Charles streets, reported leave to 
withdraw. Accepted. 

Alderman Bichards, from the Committee on the 
Fire Departn ent, reported in favor of a petroleum 
liceuse to Capen & Pierce. Accepted. 

Alderman Fairbanks, from the Committee on 
Sewers, reported leave to withdraw on petition of 
Michael Conroy, lor abatement of assessment for a 
sewer in Washington street ; also on petition of 
Mary Faxon, for abatement of assessment for a 
sewer on Washington street, and of L. B. Harring- 
ton, for an abatement of assessment for a sewer in 
Vernon street. Severally accepted. 

Alderman White, from the Committee on 
Health, reported an order which was adopted, for 
abatement of nuisances in Sturgis place and Kog- 
ers street. 

Alderman White, from the same Committee, re- 
poited in favor of the transfer of the license of 
Frederick Sowdon to water certain streets, to G. 
H.Moseley. Accepted. 

Alderman James, from the Committee on Lands, 
on the petitition of the New England Female 
Medical College, relative to an exchange of a lot 
of land on East Newton street for a lot on Cen- 
cord and Stoughton streets, made a repoi" that the 
Trustees in 1865 purchased the said lot of the city, 
and paid the full amount of the purchase, receiv- 
ing a bond tor a deed; believing that the interests 
of the city will be promoted by the exchange, the 
Superintendent of Public Lands has heen di- 
rected to make such an exchange, the lots con- 
taining the same number of feet of land. No ac- 
tion of the Board is required on the sul ject. The 
report was accepted. 

ARMORY BUILDING. 

Alderman Baldwin, from the Committee on 
Armories, to whom was referred the petition of 
the officers of Company A, First Battalion of Cav- 
alry (National Lancers), for hetter armory accom- 
modations ; and also the petition of F. W. Lincoln, 
Jr., and others, in aid of the same, submitted the 
following report : 

The rooms in Sudbury street, at present occu- 
pied by the company, have not been sufficient for 
their accommodation during several years past, 
and the subject of furnishing additional accom- 
modations, either by erecting a building specially 
adapted lor the purpose, or hiring a portion of a 
building already erected, has been several times 
urged upon the " attention of this Board by the 
Committee on Armories., 

The annual rental of the armory on Sudbury 
street amounts to $1800; .$600 heing paid by the 
State, $600 by the city, and $600 try the company. 
Undoubtedly it wculd be a measure of economy 



APEIL 12, 1869 



90 



on the part of tlie city to furnish a permanent ar- 
mory (or tlie company in a building owned by the 
city. 

There is a lot of land on Bowker street, forming 
part of the lot purchased for the Central Charily 
Bureau, having a front of over one hundred ieec 
and a depth of about fifty-four feet, which is admi- 
rably adapted for the location ot such a building. 
The third story and Mansard roof story of a build- 
ing e.ected on this lot will contain ample aacom- 
modations for the armory, and the first and second 
stories can be used for city purposes, or leased for 
a sum whict will return a good per centage on 
the money invested in the biiildinv.. 

The services which the Lancers have performed 
for the city on various occasions Hi preserving the 
public peace and as an escort at civic celebrations 
have given ihem a peculiar claim, which the 
municipal authorities have always been prompt to 
recognize. Believing that the request which they 
now make for better accommodations should re- 
ceive the favorable action of the City Council, the 
Committee respectfully recommend the passage of 
the accompany uig order: 

Ordered, That the Committee on Public Build- 
ings be requested to procure plans and estimates 
for a building to De erected on the lot of land be- 
longing to the city on Bowker street; said build- 
ing to contain accommodations in the upper sto- 
ries for Co. A, 1st Battalion of Cavalry, the lower 
stories to remain unfinished, su'oiect to the order 
of the City Council ; the expense of procuring 
said plans to be charged to the appropriation for 
armories. 

The report was accepted, and the order was 
passed. 

ENLARGEMEST OF THE PTJULIC LIBRARY BUILD- 
ING. 

Alderman Baldwin, from the Joint Standing 
Committee on the Public Library, to whom was 
rele~red so much of the Mayor's Address as relates 
to the enlargement of the Public Library build- 
ing, reported that they have made a careful exam- 
ination of tne present condition of the building, 
in company with the trustees, and are of the opin- 
ion that certain changes in the interior arrange- 
ments are required, and should be made without 
mucn delay. The usefulness of this institution 
would be greatly promoted, undoubtedly, by en- 
larging the present structure, as a better classi- 
fication of the books could be made, access to 
them facilitated, and room given for the exhibi- 
tion of such works of art as have been, or may 
hereafter be, contributed. 

Without expressing any opinion at the present 
time in regard to the exfent of the alterations 
which should be made, the committee would re- 
spectfully recommend the passage of an order to 
procure plans and estimates of such changes as 
the Board of Trustees deem expedient, and the 
whole subject can then be presented to the Cify 
Council in'sujh a shape that definite action can be 
taken. . 

Ordered, That the Committee on Public Build- 
ings, in consultation with the Board of Trustees 
of the Public Library, be requested to obtain plans 
and estimates for the enlargement or alteration ot 
the Library building in Boylston street, the ex- 
pense of procuring said plans to be charged to the 
Appropriation for Public Buildings. 

The order was read twice and passed. 

ORDERS PASSED. 

On motion of Alderman White, 

Ordered, Tnat Chapter 132 of the acts of 1869, en- 
titled An Act relating to the Conveying of Chil- 
dren to and from the Public Schools, be relerred 
to the. Committee on Public Instruction, and that 
said committee be requested to ascertain and re- 
port whether any additional appropriation is re- 
quired to provide for the conveyance of pupils 
from certain sections of the city. 

On motion of Alderman Pratt, 

Ordered, That the Committee on County Ac- 
counts be authorized to contract with some suita- 
ble person or persons to make a classified index uo 
grantors in the Kegistry of .Deeds from the com- 
mencement to the year 1800, the expense c f doing 
said work not to exceed five cents for each grant- 
or's name, to be charged to the appropriation tor 
the County of Suffolk. 

Ordered, That the Committee on County Ac- 
counts be authorized to contract with some suita- 
ble person or persons to make a classified index to 
grantees in the Kegistry of Deeds from the com- 



mencement to the year 1S55, the expense of doing- 
said work not to exceed lour cents for each grant- 
ee's name, to be chaiged to the appropriation ror 
the County of Suffolk. 

Ordered, That the Committee on Oounty Ac- 
counts be authorized to contract with some suita- 
ble person or persons to make an index to the sales 
of real estate for non-payment of taxes recorded 
in the Kegistry of Deeds from 1843 to 18G9, at an 
expense not exceeding five hundred dollars, to be 
charged to the appropriation for the County of 
Suffolk. 

Ordered, That the Committee on County Ac- 
counts be authorized to contract with some suita- 
ble person or persons for a continuation of the in- 
dex to plans in the Kegistry of Deeds, and for re- 
copying and repairing old indexes, the whole ex- 
pense of doing said work not to exceed fourteen 
hundred dollars, to be charged to the appropria- 
tion for the County of Suffolk. 

On motion of Alderman Bradles, 

Ordered, That the Committee on Ordinances be 
requested to prepare an ordinance defining the 
limitations and restrictions under which wooden 
buildings miy be erected in the Boston Highlands, 
in accordance with chapter 123 of the acts ot I860. 

On motion of Alderman TV bite, 

Ordered, Tint the Superintendent of Health be 
and he is hereby instructed to deliver to Ignatius 
Knnes forty loads of ashes (more or 'ess), and that 
he be charged therefor at the rate of fifty cents 
per load for each load s.> delivered. 

On motion ot Alderman James, 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Common 
and Public Squares, under the direction of tne 
Committee on Common, &c, be authorized to 
painc the fence around the Public Garden, at an 
expense not exceeding $1000, said amount to be 
charged to the appropriation. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent ot Streets be 
authorized to pave Tremont street, from Boylston 
street to Pleasant street, with small granite 
blocks, at an estimated cost of $21,000. 

Orderel, That the Superintendent of Streets be 
authorized to pave and grade Avon street be- 
tween Washington street and Chauncy street, ac- 
cording to the established grade of said street, at 
an estimated cost of $5000. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be 
authorized to build a plank sidewalk on the east- 
erly side of Federal street, between Dorchester 
street and the Dorchester line, and to put said 
Federal street in a good and safe condition for 
public travel, at an estimated cost cf §1200. 

Ordered, That the superintendent of Streets be 
authorized to renave Federal street, between Sum- 
mer street and' the Federal Street bridge, with 
small granite blocks at an estimated cost of 
§14,000. 

On motion of Alderman Fairbanks, 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Sewers be 
directed to construct a sewer in Concord street, 
and in Tremont street, between Newton and Len- 
ox streets. 

On motion of Alderman White, 

Ordered, That the safety and convenience ot the 
inhabitants of the city requires the widening of 
Boylston street, at the coiner of Lowell place, by 
taking land belonging to Abbott Lawrence, 
amounting to 246 square feet, at a cost of $4750. 

Ordered, That the Committee on Laying Out and 
Widening Streets, be and they hereby are author- 
ized to contract for raising and underpining the 
houses on the easterly side of Tremont street, be- 
tween Pleasant street ana the Boston & Albany 
Railroad bridge, so as to conform to the estab- 
lished grade of said street; and also (or filling up 
the cellars and back yards to a grade not less than 
twelve feec above mean low water: the owners of 
the said houses having given the city an agree- 
ment releasingall damages in consequence of such 
raising of the said houses; and that the expense 
of the same, which is estimated at $40,000, be 
charged to the Tremont street loan. 

Ordered, That there be paid to Abbott Lawrence 
and James W. Hollins, lessee, $4^50 for land taken 
and damages occasioned by the widening ot Boyls- 
ton street. 

Ordered, That there be paid to John Connolly 
$5067 for land taken and damages occasioned by 
the widening of Federal street. 

Ordered, That there be paid to John S. Fallow 
$9965 82 for laud taken and damages occasioned by 
the widening of High street, $5092 of the above 
awarded to the heirs of John Lepean, whose estate 



91 



BOARD O F A L D E R M E N 



was purchased subsequent to the widening, $4768, 
the amount awarded to said Farlow on his estate 
and $105 82 being the proceeds of sales of build- 
ings. 

On motion of Alderman James, 

Ordered, That the Chief of Police De and he is 
hereby directed to notify the owner of the estate 
on the Lortherly corner of Avon street and Cen- 
tral Court to reduce the width of the granite side- 
walk in tront of said estate to the width establisu- 
ed for tbe sidewalk on said Avon street; and in 
default thereof tbe Superintendent of Streets is 
directed to do said work at the expense of the 
owner of said estate. 

Ordered, ihat the Chief of Police be directed to 
notify the owners and abutters on Atlantic street; 
also, the owners and abutters on National street; 
also, on Lambert street, between Lambert avenue 
and Highland street; ; nd on Norfolk street, be- 
tween Lambert avenue ana Highland street, to 
furnish edgestones and lay sidewalks with brick. 

Alderman James offered the following order, 
which was passed : 

. Whereas, in the opinion of this Board, the safe- 
ty and convenience ot the inhabitants require 
that Federal street should be repaved, it is hereby 

Ordered, That due notice be given to the Metro- 
politanand South Boston Bailroad Corporations 
to pave the space between their rails and three feet 
outside tbereof on said Federal stieet, from Sum- 
mer street to the Federal street bridge, with small 
granite blocks; said work to be done at such time 
as the Superintendent of Streets shall designate 
by pavers approved by him, and to his entire sat- 
isfaction. Said Metropolitan and South Boston 
Kailroads are also directed to change the position 
of their tracks on said Federal street, so that the 
centre line of said tracks sh?ll conform as nearly 
as possible to the centreline of said Federal street. 

ADDITIONAL LOAN FOB WIDENING FEDERAL 
STREET. 

The following communication from the Commit- 
tee on Layiue: out and Widening Streets, wa9 pre- 
sented by Alderman White: 

Ihe Committee on Laying out and Widening 
Streets respectfully report that an additional 
loan of seventy-five thousand dollars will be re- 
quired for the payment of unsettled claims for 
damages occasioned by the widening of Federal 
street, between the foot of Summer street and First 
street, in South Boston. 
This street was widened June 6, 1868, and 

a loan was made at that time of $250,000 00 

Additional loan asked for. 75,000 00 

Making a total of. $325,000 00 

The loan of $250,000 was based on estimates made 
by the Committee on Streets of 1866. But since 
the widening of the street, the committee of last 
year made a careful estimate of damages, which 
was adopted by the Board of Aldermen, Dec. 14, 
1868, and which amounted to $306,039 35. 

lii the settlement for damages to the Wright es- 
tate on this street, the whole' estate was purchased 
for $27,000, which amount was paid firm this loan, 
and which was not included in either estimate 
(only the portion damaged being estimated). The 



proceeds from this estate, when sold, will not be 
credited to this loan, but will be paid into the 
Sinking Fund. 

The Committee, therefore, unanimously recom- 
mend the passage of the accompanying order. 
Kespecttully submitted, 
Newton Talbot, j 
Edwakd A. White, J Committee. 
George P.Baldwin, ) 
Ordered, That the Treasurer be, and he hereby 
is, authorized to borrow, under the direction of 
the Committee on Finance, the sum of seventy- 
five thousand dollars, and that said sum be added 
to the appropriation for the widening of Federal 
street, between the foot of Summer street and 
First street, in South Boston, known as the Fed- 
eral Street Loan. 
The order was read twice aud passed. 

ORDEKS OF NOTICE. 

Orders of notice were reported and adopted, as 
iollows: 

On the proposed construction of a sewer in 
Monmouth street, between , Marion and Brooks 
streets. Healing Monday, April 19, 4 P. M. 
l&On the petition of Frost & Co., tot leave to 
erect a stable for more than four noises in Stan- 
hope street. Hearing Monday, April 19, 4 P. M. 

On the proposed extension of the sewer in Mount 
rieasant avenue, above Forest street. Hearing 
Monday, April 19, 4 P. M. 

On the proposed construction of a sewer in 
Harrison avenue, between Dover street and Ash- 
land place. Hearing Monday, April 19, 4 P. M. 

On the notice of H. M. Wilson, that the Board 
proposes to widen Boylston street. Hearing 
Monday, April 26, at 4 P. M. 

On the proposed construction ot a sewer in D 
street, between Baxter street and the Old Colony 
& Newport Railroad. Hearing Monday, A'^rd 19, 
at 4 P.M. 

On the proposed laying out and acceptance of 
Dartmouth street, sixty feet in width, from Co- 
lumbus avenue to St. James avenue, across the 
Boston & Albany Railroad and the Boston & 
Providence Railroad. Hearing Monday, April 26, 
at 4 P. M. 

Order declaring to be dangerous a building now 
erecting, owned by Timothy Connelly, on Village 
street, near Chapman street. Hearing Monday, 
April 19, it 4 P.M. 

Alderman Bichards moved to strike out section 
28 of the rules of the Board, which prohibits Com- 
mittees of the Board from visiting other cities at 
the public expense, without a previous vote of the 
Bjard. 

1 In support of the motion, the mover said it was 
often desirable to make such visits at a small 
public expense, when the public would be much 
benefited tuereby, but rather than ask for a vjte 
of the Board, committees chose to forego the pro- 
posed visits and advantages. He was ot opinion 
that rule 27 was sufficient to guard the public in- 
terests in such matters. 

Alderman Bradlee asked to have the matter laid 
over, believing it would be well to consider the 
subject before any action was taken. 

The proposition was accordingly laid over. 

Adjourned to Tuesday, April 13, at 7% o'clock. 



93 



COMMON COUNCIL 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 
APRIL 13, 1869. 



An adjourned meeting of the Board of Aldermen 
was hel I tbis evening at 7}£ o'clock, Alderman 
James, the chairman, presiding. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

Ryder & Harris, for the grade and line of Sum- 
mer and High streets. Reierred to the Committee 
on Paving. 

ORDERS PASSED. 

On motion of Alderman Richards, 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be 
directed, under the advice of the Joint Special 
Committee on the Cburcb Street Territory, to set 
the edgestones and pave tbe streets and sidewalks 
embraced in said territory; the expense to be 
charged to the Appropriation for tbe Church 
Street District. 

On motion of Alderman Bradlee: 

Ordered, That tbe Mayor be authorized to dis- 
cbarge the mortgage given by James W. Reed to 
Win. Mino t , and assigned by Wm. Minot, to Mary 
P. Townseud, and by ibe executors of said Town- 
send to tbe city, for the use of the Public Library, 
the note for winch said mortgage was given hav- 
ing been fully paid. 

Adjourned. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 

APRIL 15, 1869. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Common 
Council was held this evening at iy z o'clocK, Wil- 
iam G. Harris, the President, in the chair. 

PAPERS PROM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

Quarterly reports from the several departments 
were read and ordered to be placed on file. 

The several petitions of George L. Pike and oth- 
ers and of George M. King, were referred, in con- 
currence. 

The Auditor's Exhibit, City Document No. 36, 
was ordered to be placed on file. 

The reference of the communication from tbe 
Managers ot the proposed Musical .Peace Festival, 
requesting the cooperation of the city in the recep- 
tion and enLertainment of distinguished visitors, 
and the addition of tbe Chairman of tbe Board of 
Aldermen to tbe Committee on said Festival, was 
concurred in, and Mr. Batcbelder oi Ward Four 
was added to the said Committee. 

The report that no further action is necessary on 
the petition of the N. E. Female Medical College 
for an exchange of land, the request of tbe peti- 
tioners having been, in effect, agreed to, was ac- 
cepted in concurrence. 

A letter from the consulting physicians of the 
city, resigning their offices, was accepted, and re- 
ferred in concuirence to the Committee on Nomi- 
nation of those officers. 

The following orders were passed in concur- 
rence : 

Order authorizing the Mayor to quit claim to the 
heirs of Thomas Tileston the riabt which the city 
may possess of draining through then - land be- 
tween Purchase and Broad streets. 

Order that the Committee on Ordinances be re- 
quested to prepare an ordinance defining tbe 
restrictions under which wooden buildings maybe 
erected in the Boston Highlands. 

Order referring the act of the Legislature, re- 
lating to the conveying of children to and from 
the public schools, to the Committee en Public In- 
struction, with directions to ascertain the addi- 
tional appropriation necessary to pay fcr the con- 
veyance of the pupils. 



The order authorizing the erection of a stable in 
the rear of Hook and Ladder House JS'o. 1, and to 
repair the present building, at a cost of $0500, was 
passed under suspension of the mles. 

The order authorizing the Harbor Master to ap- 
point an assistant, to take charge of the chan • 
nelof tbe Koxbury Canal, beinjr under considera- 
tion, 

Mr. Wadsworth of Ward Four wished to know 
whether it was designed to create a new office, as 
a charge upon the Treasury. He would prefer to 
give additional compensation ro the person who 
had diseharged the duties of the office of Harbor 
Master, rather than have a new office created. He 
moved that the order be laid on the table. Carried 
by a vote of 18 to 9. 

'The order lequesting the Committee on Public 
Buildings, in consultation with the Trustees of the 
Public Library, to obtain plans and estimates lor 
the enlargement of the library building, was 
passed in concuirence. 

The order to obtain plans and estimates for a 
building, to be erected on Bowker street, to con- 
tain accommodations in the upper stories for 
Company A, First Battalion of Cavalry, tk<; lower 
stories to remain unfinished until further orders, 
was read, and on motion of Mr. Richards of Ward 
Eight, was referred to the Committee on Over- 
seers of the Poor. 

The resolve and order for widening of Congress 
street, at corner of Milk street, was oh motion of Mr. 
Snow of Ward Eleven referred to the Committee 
on Streets on the part of the Common Council. 

Mr. Richards ot Ward Eight, from the Commit- 
tee on Streets, subsequently reported that the or- I 
der ought to pass, when it was read a second time 
and passed. 

The order authorizing the purchase of one of the 
American Consolidated Company's Anninilators 
inr each of the Station, Engine, Hose and Hook 
and Ladder Houses was considered. 

Mr. Batcbelder of Ward Four moved its refer- I 
ence to the Committee on the Fire Department. 

Mr. Tucker of Ward Six stated that the subject 
had been considered by tbat committee fully. 

Mr. Osborn of Ward Six inquired whether other 
companies than the one named had a hearing on I 
the subject. 

Mr. Tucker replied that the various other com- 
panies bad been consolidated, and the committee 
had no other object than to get the best machine 
which could be had. 

Mr. Osborn said he had understood there was 
another machine, and that there had been cases 
where the Consolidated Company's annibilators 
had proved inefficient on account of leakage. The 
macnine he reierred to he saw in a wagon in Kilby 
street, which would, however, be too large and 
cumbersome, but smaller ones could be applied by 
hand. He wished further investigation before 
taking definite action, and moved that the repoit 
be recommitted to the Committee on Fire Depart- 
ment to investigate the claims of other machines. 

Mr. Jacobs of Ward Five said the machine refer- , 
red to had been examined. The Committee on I 
Public Buildings had a hearing on the subject, ' 
when all narties interested were heard. 

Mr. Jenks of Ward Three inquired if one mem- I 
her ol the Committee on Public Buildings last year 
was not interested in this machine, and whether 
that was not the reason why this report was made. 

Mr. Jacobs stated that if such was the fact the 
Committee did not know it. 

Mr. Osborn said he understood that in the new J 
machine referred to by him, power was applied by 
hand, while in the other ones it was not. 

Mr. Jacobs said it was so. 

Mr. Osboin remarked that as the Chemical Fire 
Annihilator was not tue same as the Consolidated 
one, he wished all doubts as to the best one to be 
cleared up, or that the report be recommitted. 

The motion to recommit was carried. 

The order authorizing a loan of seventy-five 
thousand dollars, to be added to the appropria- 
tion for the widening of Federal street, between 
the foot of Summer street and First street, Soutb 
Boston, was taken up. 

Mr. Snow of Ward Eleven said he had looked in 
vain for the printed order, on the table and in the 
Ale, ann moved that the subject be laid on the ta- 
ble. Carried. 

SECRETARY OF THE BOARD OF ENGINEERS. 

The certificate of the election of Henry W. Long- 
ley as Secretary of the Board of Engineers of the 



APEIL ID, I860 



93 



Fire Department, was read, when the Council pro- 
ceeded to a ballot, and Mr, LongJey was elected, 
in concurrence, receiving 47 votes out of 49 cast, 
Messrs. Flanders cf Ward Kive, "Woods of Ward 
Twelve, and Iiyan of Ward Thirteen, being the 
Committee on receiving and counting the vote. 

ELECTION OF SECOND ASSISTANT ASSESSORS. 

The election of Second Assistant Assessors was 
taken up, when a petition was read from 
Johnson & Thompson and others, shoe and 
leather dealers, stating that conviction that some 
one representing their interest should be placed 
on the board, and recommending C. W. Forbush 
as a competent person, familiar with that branch 
of trade. The communication was ordered to be 
placed on tile. 

Messrs. Braman of Ward Six, Batchekler of 
Ward Four, and lngalls of Ward Twelve, were ap- 
pointed a committee to receive, sort and count the 
votes. The committee reported as follows : 

Whole number of votes 52 

Necessary to a choice 27 

Ward 1— Daniel J. Sweeny, 52; John Noble, 52. 

Ward 2— James Healev, 51; John F. Fiynn, 46; 
J. J. Fox, 5; R. H. Carpenter, R. H. Carlton, John 
K. Fairfield, 1 each. 

Ward 3— Bnggs Mann, 4; E. C. Donnelly, 20; B. 
W. James, 1 ; Joseph Allen, 28. 

Ward 4— F. S. Carruth, 43; E. Stone Goodwin, 
13; Beni. T. Gould, 5: C. W. Forbush, 8; A. W. 
Forbush, 1; Wm. S. Whitney, S2. 

Ward 5— John Magnire, 20; John A. Daley, 
50; Fierce A. Dolierty, 32. 

Ward G— Oliver 1*. Bowman, 45; J. G. Sanderson, 
6. 

Ward 7— John A. Johnston, 34; Charles S. Blood, 
18. 

Ward 8— Cadis B. Boyce, 48 ; B. J. Remick, 4. 

Ward 9— Horace Jenkins, 49; James Standish, 2. 

Ward 10— Edward A. Hunting, 37; Frederick G. 
Pope, 14. 

Ward 11— Geo. W. Skinner, 50. 

Ward 12— William Gallagher, 44; Thomas Hill, 
7. 

Ward 13— Geo. F. Davis, 35; Alexander Stuart, 
14. 

Wardll— Wm.H. Mcintosh, 46; Coleman Cook, 
2. 

Ward 15— S. P. Blake. 51. 

Messers. Allen of Ward 3, Whitney of Ward 4, 
Doherty of Ward 5, Hunting of Ward 10, and Gal- 
lagher of Ward 12, were elected, in non-concur- 
rence, and all others having the requisite number 
of votes were elected in concurrence. 

The order relating to the paving of the streets in 
the Church Street territory, was read once. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

A. P. Hawkins and others, members of the Fire 
Department, that a tire alarm bell on the \vells 
Schoolhouse be put in order. Referred to the 
Committee on Fire Alarms. 

Mr. Jenks ot Ward Three called the attention 
of the Council to the fact that the aggregate 
number of votes for an assessor of Ward Three 
was 53, while 52 was the whole number cast. 

Mr. lngalls of Ward Twelve, ot the Committee, 
stated that the matter was easily explained. Some 
gentleman, out of sport perhaps, had voted for 



two persons in Ward Ihree, although Ward Three; 
was entitled to only one Assessor, while he had ! 
marked off one name from some other Ward. The' 
same was true of Ward Two. 

Mr. Jenks wished to know who the votes were' 
to be counted for. where there were more than 
enough in any one Ward. 

Mr. lngalls said the question was considered by 
the Committee, and there was no doubt that the 
member who voted ior two Assessors in Ward 
Three struck off some name from the list. It was 
thought best to report the votes just as they were 
cast. This vote would not affect the result, be- 
cause it might be thrown out. 

Mr. Jenks said the explanation did not meet his 
question, for in some cases the extra vote might 
defeat or elect a candidate. 

ORDERS PASSED. 

On motion of Mr. Wadsworth of Ward Four, 

Ordered, That the Committee on Public Lands 
be requested to set apart a lot of lanci on Fort 
avenue and Beach Glen avenue, known as the Fort 
lot, in Ward Fifteen, for the use of the Water 
Works, said lot to be placed under the charge of 
the Water Board. 

Mr. Tucker of Ward Six offered the following 
order, which was read: 

Whereas, Levi Gaylord, acting as a member of 
the Fire Department, and attached to Hose Co. 
No. 5, was seriously injured at a fire on the 4th of 
November last, while in the discharge ot his 
duty,— 

Ordered, That there he allowed and paid to Levi 
Gaylord the sum of one hundred and fifty dollars, 
on account of injuries received while in the dis- 
charge of his duty as a member ot the Fire De- 
partment, said sum to be charged to the appro- 
priation ior the Fire Department. 

Mr. Gray of Ward Twelve inquired if the order 
had been considered by any committee. 

Mr. Tucker stated that the matter had been be- 
fore the Engineers of the Fire Department, and 
the order was approved at a meeting of the Joint 
Committee of the Fire Department this forenoon. 
Mr. Gaylord experienced severe injuries in No- 
vember, and cannot now touch his foot to the 
ground. The necessities of his familyrequire that 
this order should be adopted immediately. 

The order was read a second time ar d passed. 

On motion of Mr. Snow of Ward Eleven, the or- 
der authorizing a loan of $75,000 to be added to the 
appropriation for the widening of Federal street, 
was taken from the table and read ouce. 

Mr. Osborn of Ward Six, offered an order that 
100 copies of the journal of the proceedings of the 
Common Council of last year be bound and iur- 
nished to new members of the Common Council, to 
the Board of Aldermen, and the heads of Depart- 
ments. 

Mr. Osborn, in explanation of the order, stated 
that from some reason the Board of Aldermen and 
Heads of Departments were not furnished with 
the printed journal of the Council as prepared by 
the Clerk, and bound in a volume. There were 
enough of them waiting to be bound, and if not so 
used they will be likely to be disposed of as waste 
paper. Courtesy to the other branch would seem 
to require that it should be furnished with the 
journal of the Common Council. 

The order was passed. 

Adjourned. 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



94 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 
APRIL 19, 1869. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Board of Al - 
tiermen was held this afternoon, at four o'clock 
Mayor Shurtleff presiding. 

APPOINTMENTS MADE AKD CONFIRMED. 

Ai Ree, constable to serve warrants for the 
Health Department. 

Daniel B. Curtis, Assistant Superintendent of 
Health. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

Geo. F. Parknian and others, that Fruit street, 
west of Charles street, be opened as a highway, or 
else be discontinued. 

H. W. Suter, trustee, N. J. Bradlee, trustee, and 
D. N. Kichards, that the assessments for better- 
ments on their estates in Avon place be appor- 
tioned into three parts. 

J. a. Chadwick and otbers, that Bainbridge 
street may be extended to Shawmut avenue. 

S. H. L. Pierce and otbers, tbat D street may be 
extended to Federal street. 

James E. Stanley and otbers, that Ward street 
be extended to Preble street. 

Severally referred to tne Committee on Streets. 

B. Sheridan, for a sewer in Ninth street, between 
E and Lark streets. 

Selectmen of West Roxbury, that the city would 
cooperate with them in the improvement of Stony 
Brook. 

Eleazer F. Pratt, for a sewer through Atlantic 
avenue and for suitable boxing along the line 
thereof. 

H. W. Wilson and others, for a sewer in Old 
Harbor street. 

Severallv referred to the Committee on Sewers. 

George S. Hillard and others, that Avon street 
be paved with Nicolson pavement. 

Joanna Donovan, for leave to construct a cellar 
door-way at No. 170 Sixth street. 

Harriet M. Miles, for leave to remove a tree in 
front of 34 Forest street. 

C. A. Richards, that Northampton and Camden 
streets be paved with wood. 

Wm. A. Lane and others, that edgestones be 
raised in Rochester street, and the street he 
graded. 

H. 0. Parker & Co., Paul Adams and others, that 
School street be paved with the Stafford wooden 
pavemeiit. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Paving. 

Joseph Coolidge, lor leave to place a steam en- 
gine and boiler in his building at the corner of 
Charles and Cambridge streets. Order of notice 
issued for May 10th, at 4 P. M. 

Eben Alexander, Andrew Hall and others, for 
the use of Faneuil Hall, May 27, lor a Universalist 
Festival. Referred to Committee on Faneuil 
Hall. 

John 'loland, tbat the city would defend a suit 
brought against him by a night-soil contractor. 
Referred to Committee on Health. 

Jonas Fitch, President of the Massachusetts 
Charitable Mechauic Association, for the use of 
Faneuil Hall in September and Octouer for the 
purpose of holding an exhibition ol American 
manufactures ; also for permission to erect a bridge 
to connect Faneuil and Quincy halls. Keierred to 
the Committee on Faneuil Hall. 

NOTICES OF INTENTION TO BUILD. 

Henry Law, Marginal street, near Cottage street ; 
T. Albert Taylor, Dorr street, between Highland 
street and Lambert avenue; George Sehell, 1108 
Tremont street ; James A.Thomas, Fourth street; 
Joel T. Watson, Nassau avenue ; Emerson & Feh- 
mer. 3 Beacon street; F. F. Wheeloek, 16 Cham- 
bers street; F. Merrill, 56 Chardon street; N.J. 
Bradlee, corner of Chauncy and Avon streets; 
Patrick Fitzpatrick, Marion, between Paris and 



Havre streets ; W. L. & C. J. Prescott, East Castie 
street and Harrison avenue; Slade Luther, 42 
Parkman street; H. A. Doe, D street, opposite 
Eighth street; F. A. Richardson, rear 224 North- 
ampton street; Warren Hayford, Village, corner of 
Dover street; John Kennison, Eutaw, between Ma- 
rion and Brooks streets; Chamberlain & Mars ton, 
72 and 74 Waltham street; Chas. WoodD6rry& Son, 
40 and 42 Congress street ; Robert Bunten, corner 
of Merrimac and Gouch streets ; Timothy Madden, 
corner of Paris and Marion streets ; Richards & 
Park, 258 Tremont street; John McOormick, cor- 
ner of Chelsea and Bennington streets ; Stanislaus 
Weiler, 11 and 13 Smith street; Mark Dowling, 75 
Beach street; Isaac Somes, K street; N.L. Stronsj, 
10 Bond street. Severally referred to the Commit- 
tee on Streets. 

QUARTERLY REPORT OF THE CITY PHYSICIAN. 

The quarterly report of Dr. Wm. Read, City 
Physician, showed the following results of the bus- 
iness of his office for the quarter ending March 31 : 

Persons vaccinated, 107 ; children examined lor 
admission to the public schools, 71 ; physicians 
supplied with vaccine lymph, 51; appointments of 
men on the police, examined and certificates giv- 
en, 29; number of persons visited at the jail and 
prescribed for, 370. 

The following letter was received from the City 
Physician and referred to Committee on Health : 

April 19, 1869. 
To the Honorable the Board of Health of the City of 

Boston. 

Clentlemen, — My attention has been called to a 
case of sickness marked by a painfnl eruption in 
the hands and other parts of the body, in a young 
girl employed in one or our large' box-making 
establishments in this city. Ascertaining that 
other employes had suffered, in a similar way. 
although to a less degree, suspicions arose that 
the disease in question was caused by the paste 
used in the work. On making this representation 
to the proprietors, tney at once gave me a sample 
of the paste, remarking that they had the assur- 
ance of the manufacturers (Hall & Co., Haver- 
hill street,) that no substances deleterious 
to health were used in its composition. 
By direction ot the Assistant Superintend- 
ent of Health, I forwarded the sample 
of paste to Dr. J. C. White, for analysis. I have 
the honor to inclose his reply. I do not know as 
the matter comes within the sphere of action of 
the Board, but the public should have some pro- 
tection against the great harm and danger to 
health which a common use of this secret prepar- 
ation, as I am informed, will surely expose tnem 
to. I am, gentlemen, 

V ery respectfully, 
Wm. Read, 

City Physician. 
Boston, 10 Park square, April 17. 
Dear Sir: 

The specimen of paste contained arseniousacid, 
put in, I presume, to prevent moulding. It would 
produce just such efiects upon the skin as you de- 
scribe. Yours very truly, 

Jamks C. White. 

HEARINGS ON ORDERS OF NOTICE. 

The several orders of notice for hearings, on 
the proposed laying out of Rockville place; on 
the laying out, widening, extending and grading 
of Mount Warren avenue; on the petition ot the 
Metropolitan Railroad Company for a temporary 
track on Berkeley street ; on the proposed con- 
struction of a sewer in Monmouth street, between 
Marion and Brooks streets; on the petition of 
Frost & Co., for leave to erect a stable for more 
than four horses in Stanhope street; on the pro- 
posed extension of the sewer in Mount Pleasant 
avenue, above Forest street ; on the proposed con- 
struction of a sewer in Harrison avenue, between 
Dover street and Ashland place; and on the pro- 
posed construction of a sewer in D street, between 
Baxter street and the Old Colony & Newport 
Railroad, were taken up, and no person appearing 
in either case, the reports were recommitted. 

The order of notice on order declaring to bo 
dangerous a building now erecting, owned by Tim- 
othy Connelly, on village street, near Chapman 
street, was taken up. 

Alderman Seaver stated that the owner was en- 
gaged in altering the construction of the building, 
so that it would soon be safe. On his motion the 
order waB laid on the table. 



95 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN, 



UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

The resolve and order to lay out Glendon street, 
formerly Knox street (East Boston), fifty feet in 
width, at no expense to the city, was read a second 
time and passed. 

The order to rescind the Twenty-eighth Section 
of tue Kules and Orders of the Board of Aldermen, 
which prohibits committees of the Board from 
visiting other cities at the public expense, with- 
out a previous vote of the Board, was considered. 

Alderman Bradlee stated that on his suggestion 
the order was laid over, and he was still of opinion 
that the order should not be passed. The rule re- 
ferred to has been in force many years, and has been 
found to operate beneficially. If it was necessary 
for the interests of the city that any Committee 
should visit other cities, there could be no objec- 
tion to coming to the Board to get an appropria- 
tion for the purpose. The Board had always bewi 
willing to appropriate money to defray such ex- 
penses, where the object of the visit was legitir 
mate, and the expenditure could not be considered 
an extravagance. He did not design to make any 
reflections on any Committees or on this Board, in 
his remarks, and it was not for this Board alone 
that action should be taken, for ihere might be 
Boards hereafter less scrupulous in expending the 
puolic money. It might be said, it is true, that 
each year the Board makes its own rules, but if the 
rule in question is now retained it will be less like- 
ly, to be rescinded hereafter. 

Alderman Richards said that in offering the 
order he did it with due consideration, and from 
motives of economy. It was generally the case 
that when an order was put in to pay the expenses 
of going away, the amount was put larger lor the 
very reason that the Committee had to come to 
the Board to sanction the expenditure. The money 
was generally all spent, lor there was no fund to 
which a balance could be paid, and no committee 
would think of making a return of a balance. 
On the other hand, cases would frequently occur 
in which but a small expense would be incurred, 
and it would be a great saving to have the com- 
mittee expend only what was necessary, and the 
bills to be approved on their return. 

The yeas and nays were ordered on the passage 
of the order, which was lost, by a vote of seven to 
five, as follows, not two-thirds voting therefor: 

Yeas— Baldwin, Hawes, James, Hichards, Ser- 
ver, Van Nostrand. White. 

Nays— Bradlee, Fairbanks, Pratt, Rice, Talbot. 

COMMON COUNCIL PAPERS. 

The petition of A. F. Hawkins and others, for a 
fire alarm bell on the Wells Schoolhouse, was re- 
ferred in concurrence to the Committee on Fire 
Alarms. 

The following orders were passed, in concur- 
rence: 

Order for Committee on Public Lands to set 
apart a lot of land on Fort avenue and Deep Glen 
avenue for use of the Water Works. 

Order to pay Levi Gaylord $150 for injuries re- 
ceived while on duty as a fireman. 

The order to procure plans, &c., for Armory 
Building on Bowker street was referred to Com- 
mittee on Overseers of the Poor. 

The order for purchase if U. S. Fire Annihila- 
tors, recommitted, with instructions to hear par- 
ties owning other patents, coming up for concur- 
rence, 

Alderman Richards opposed the recommitment, 
stating that the subject had been thoroughly con- 
sideied in both the Committees on Public Build- 
ings and on the Fire Department, and all parties 
had been beard. He hoped the recommendation 
of the insurance offices would prevail, and moved 
that the Board non-concur in the recommitment. 
The motion was carried. 

ELECTION OF SECOND ASSISTANT ASSESSORS. 

The election of several Second Assistant Asses- 
sors was taken up, and bailo tings took place as 
follows : 

Alderman Fairbanks withdrew the name of E. 
C. Donnelly in Ward Three. 

Ward 3— Joseph Allen, 9; Briggs Mann, 3. 

Ward 4— E. Stone Goodwin, 5; Alvin P. Rollins, 
5; Wm. Si Whitney, 2; 

Ward5— John M. Maguire, 7; Pierce A. Doher- 



Ward 10— Frederick G. Pope, 9; Edward A. 
Hunting, 3. 

Ward 12— Thomas Hill, 8; Wm. Gallagher, 4. 

There being no choice in Ward Four, subsequent 
ballotmgs took place, as follows: 

Second ballot— E. Stone Goodwin, 4; Wm. S. 
Whitney, 4 ; A. P. Rollins, 4. 

Third ballot— Rollins and Goodwin, 4 each; 
Whitney and Gianvilie Mears, 2 each. 

Fourth Ballot— Rollins, 6; Mears, 4; Goodwin, 2. 

Fifth ballot— Rollins, 7 ; Mears, 5. 

Mr. Alleu was elected in concurrence, the others 
all in non-concurrence. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on 
Streets, reported no action necessary on sundry 
notices of intention to build. Accepted. 

Alderman Whit?, from the Crminittee on Li- 
censes, reported licenses lor five Doot-blacks, two 
newsboys, and cne boy each to sell shoe lacings 
and lamp mats. Accepted. 

Alderman White also reported licenses to tv en- 
ty victuallers, several wagon licenses and for the 
transfer of others, also licenses tor the sale of 
second-hand articles and for a billiard saloon. Sev- 
erally accepted. 

The same committee reported in favor of licen- 
ses to A. P. Ryder to give a concert at Tremont 
Temple; T,. u. Lent, lor a circus 'for two weeks 
from July 5; Warren Street Chapel Festival at 
Music Hall May 1 ; Davenport Brothers, for a Se- 
ance at Music Hall; Thos. J. Denny, for a variety 
perforaiance at the Theatre Comiq'ue ; also for the 
exhibition of Sheep and the Wild Men of Borneo. 
Severally accepted. 

The same committee made a report revoking the 
license of Joseph Sheinieldt as a dealer in second- 
hand articles, lor cause, at No. 122 Essex street. 
Accepted. 

Alderman Seaver, from the Committee on 
Market, reported in favor of a transfer of half a 
lease of Stalls 69 and 71, Faneuil Hall Market, and 
half a lease of Stall 23 new Faneuil Hall Market. 
Accepted. 

Aldeiman Hawes, from the Committee on Steam 
Engines, reported in favor of granting the peti- 
tion of Hill Brothers, to put up a steam engine at 
the corner of F and Third Streets. Accepted. 

Alderman James, from the Committee on Pav- 
ing, reported reference to Committee on Streets, 
on the petition of S. G, Howe that Fifth street be 
graded, and on petition of J. K. & N. Brown, for 
change of name of Highland place to Parker Hill 
avenue, and that it be accepted and extended. 
Severally accepted. 

Alderman James, from the same committee, re- 
ported no action necessary on petition of John A. 
Carnes and others against a change of grade m 
Curve street ; and leave to withdraw severally on 
petitions of Sarah E. and Israel Huckins, for grade 
damages in Shawmut avenue ; of Lucius B. Marsh, 
that the portion of Warren avenue between Pem- 
broke and .Newton streets be called Columbus 
avenue; of Charles F. A. Feyhl. for compensation 
for change of grade of Ruggles street, and of Phe- 
ne Daniels, io v compensation for grade damages 
in Shawmut avenue. Severally accepted. 

Alderman White, from the Committee on 
Health, reported that leave be granted to C. F. 
Karcher to erect a stable for more than four horses 
on Eighth street. Accepted. 

Alderman Fairbanks, from t'ie Committee on 
Sewers, reported leave to withdraw on petition of 
the heirs of Peter Renton, for an abatement of an 
assessment for a sewer in Broadway, and of Rob- 
ert tV right and others, for an extension of the 
Shawmut avenue sewers. 

Alderman James, from the Committee on Pav- 
ing, made a report that changes in the names of 
the following named streets be hereby adopted; 
and the order was passed : 

Asnland street, Ward Fourteen, to be called Sea- 
view street. 

Berlin street, Ward Nine, to be called Tennyson 
street. 

Brewster street, Ward Thirteen, to be called 
Renfrew street. 

foundry street, Ward Thirteen, to be called 
Farnham street. 

Marion street, Ward Nine, to be called aielrose 
street. 

Messinger street, Ward Six, to be called Brim- 
mer street. 



APRIL 19, 186 9 



96 



ORDERS OF NOTICE. 

Orders of notice were reported and adopted as 

On the proposed construction of a sewer in 
Sixth street. Hearing Monday next, April 26, 4 

On the proposed construction of a sewer on 
Winthrop street. Heaiiug on Monday, April 26, 4 

On the proposed extension of Eighth street. 
Hearing Monday, May 3, 4 P.M. 

On the petition of Josenh Coolidge for a steam 
engine and boiler, at the corner of Cambridge 
4 P m stTeets - Hearing on Monday May 10 , 

ORDERS PASSED. 

On motion of Alderman James, 
Ordered, That the Superintendent of Common 
and Squares, under the direction of the Commit- 
tee on Common and Public Squares, be authorized 
to purchase the gravel required for the walks and 
malls on the Common, Public Garden and Public 
Squares; aiso the loam, manure, sods, trees 
plants, vines, seeds and bulbs to be used on the 
same, the expense thereof not to exceed the sev- 
eral sums estimated therefor in the Auditor's pri- 
mates tor 1869-70, amounting to $lo,500, said amount 
to be charged to the appropriation lor Common 
&c. ; also be authorized to pave new gutters and 
repair old ones on the Common and Public 
Squares, at an expense not exceeding $1300, to be 
charged to the appropriation for Common and 
Public Squares. 

Ordered, Tuat the Committee on Common and 
lublic Squares be authorized to contract for do- 
ing all the work and furnishing ail the plants 
shiubs, &c, lequired in Worcester, Franklin 
Blaekstone and Lowell squares, and Union park 
during the season of 1869, for a sum not exceeding 
$1550, to be charged to the appropriation for Com- 
mon and Public Squares. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Common 
and Squares, under the direction and approval of 
the Committee on Common, &c, be authorized to 
contract for the amount of earth and loam re- 
quired to grade the low portion of Boston Com- 
mon lying between the Frog Pond and Beacon 
Street Mall, at an exppnse not exceeding $4000, to 
be charged to the appropriation lor Common and 
Public Squares. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Common 
and Squares be authorized to hire team work for 
the Common, Garden, and Public Squares, and 
purchase tools and tree guards for the same/at a 
cost not exceeding $2000; also to repair drains, 
cesspools, and mison work to fountains located 
on the Common, Public Garden and Public 
Squares, at a cost not exceeding $1500, to be 
charged to the Appropriation for the Common 

Ordered. That the Superintendent of Common 
and Public Squares be authorized, under the direc- 
tion of the Committee on Common and Public 
Squares, to employ such laborers as are required 
for the care and improvement of the Common, 
Public Garden and Public Squares, &c, the pay of 
said laborers to be charged to the appropriation 
for Common, Public Squares, &c. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Health be 
authorized to water that part of the mill dam road 
lying between Dartmouth street and the boundary 
line between the city of Boston and the town of 
Brooklme, said watering to be done as a matter of 
economy, to prevent the gravel from being blown 
ayvay and to preserve the roadway in good condi- 
tion. ° 
On motion of Alderman Van Nostrand, 
Ordered, That the Committee on Bathing be au- 
thorized to repair and maintain the bathing houses 
for men and boys on West Boston bridge, Craigie's 
bridge, Warren bridge, Arch wharf, Mount Wash- 
ington avenue bridge, at the foot of L street, 
South Boston, on Dover street bridge, onein South 
Bay and Cabot street. Boston Highlands; also to 
repair and maintain bathing houses for women 
and girls on Warren bridge, at the Sectional Dock, 
East Boston, at the foot of Broadway, South Bos- 
ton, on Dover street bridge, and on Cabot street, 
Boston Highlands, at an expense not exceeding 
$1200, to be charged to the appropriation for Pub- 
lic Bathing. 

Ordered, That the Committee on Bathing be au- 
thorized to construct a bath-house for men and 
boys at the Sectional Dock, East Boston, and main- 



tain the same, at an expense not exceeding $3000, 
Baths C arged t0 the appropriation for Public 

n„VhnW, e 5,' t That c , he Com mittee on Bathing be 
™!^ e £ to ,f m ^ lo y such assistance as may be 
required for the proper care and management of 
the several bathing establishments under their 
cnaige, the expense thereof to be charged to the 
appropriation tor bathing, and, with expendituies 
heretofore autnonzed, not to exceed tile amount 
of said appropriation. 
On motion of Alberman James, 

Ordered, That in addition to the lights and priv- 
ileges heretofore granted, the Metropolitan Rail- 
tl^i, -°" I s authorized to lay down a temporary 
track in Berkeley street, from Tremont street, to 
Irovidence street, under the direction ol the Com- 
mittee on Paving, and to the satisfaction of the 
Superintendent of Streets, subject to the usual re- 
strictions, and remove the same when ordered so 
to do, and place the streets in the same condition 
as beiore fcne tracks were laid down. 

Ordered, That the plan as drawn by Thomas W 
Davis, City Surveyor, and dated Apii' 19, 1869 
showing the land on Newton and Stoughton 
streets, east of Harrison avenue, as laid out by 
the Joint Standing Committee on Public Lands. 

e ^ an , berebv 1S approved by the Board. 

Ordered, That the Board adopt and establish 
the grades of Federal street, between Dorchester 
street and the Dorchester line, National street 
and Bristol street, as shown on plans made by the 
City Surveyor, dated April 12, 1869, approved by 
the Committee on Paving, and deposited in the 
office of the said City Surveyor. 

On motion of Alderman Talbot, 

*iV r K d nn l r d ', Th ?i * here be P aid to T. Willis Pratt, 
jiu,5U0 lor land taken and damages occasioned bv 
the widening of Federal street, under resolve of 
June 6, 1868, and that the same be charged to the 
Federal street loan. 

Ordered, That there be paid to the heirs of Al- 
mon Piatt, $6000 for land taken and damages occa- 
sioned by the widening of Federal street, to be 
charged to the Federal street loan. 

Ordered, That there be paid to James W. Leath- 
erbee $ 12,627 for land taken and damages occa- 
sioned by the widening of Federal street, under 
resolve of June 6, 1868, and that the same be 
charged to the Federal street loan. 

Ordered, That there be paid to Samuel Rice 
S8000 for land taken and damages occasioned by 
the widening of South Cedar street, by resolve of 
Nov. 6, 1868, (the estate upon which the widening 
was made then belonging to Mary Eliza Bird.) 

Ordered, That there be paid to Levi L. Tower 
$7350 for land taken and damages occasioned by 
the widening of Congress street, under resolve of 
April 16, 18C9. 

Ordered, That there be paid to Wm. Pray $325 
for land taken and damages occasioned oy the 
widening of Dorchester street, under resolve of 
July 15, 1867. 
On motion of Alderman Seaver, 
Ordered, That the Auditor of Accounts be in- 
structed to examine the books, accounts, vouchers 
and records of the East Boston Ferry Company 
and report to this Board as soon as practicable the' 
cost of the property at present owned by said Fer- 
ry Company to the stockholders thereof, or the 
amount at which the same now stands them in, 
wiMi such details thereof, viz.: bonds, stocK, notes 
and otherwise, as he shall judge expedient. 

Ordered, That the Chairman of the Committee 
on Ferries be authorized to appear before any 
commitiee of the Legislature, and take such meas- 
ures as he deems expedient to protect the city's 
interests in the matter of legislation concerning 
the East Boston ferries. 
On motion of Alderman Talbot, 
Ordered, That a notice to quit be served on Mary 
Eliza Bird, Samuel Kice and James Hutchinson on 
the line ot widening of South Cedar street. 

Alderman Talbot offered three orders in relation 
to abandonment of estates to the Committee 
on Streets, with preambles setting forth the facts 
in relation to the same, the orders being in sub- 
stance as follows, which ware adopted : 

Order for taking 1260 feet of land for the widen- 
ing of Matthews street, the estate being aban- 
doned by Hannah Bradford, tor the widening of 
the street, the cost ot said land being estimated at 
$7000. 

Order for taking the land of heirs of Isaac Pack- 
ard, abandoned in the widening ot Matthews 



97 



BOAR DO F ALDERMEN. 



street, the amount of land being 1247 feet and the 
estimated cost $7000. 

Order for taking the land of Joseph G. Russell, 
1225 feet on Matthews street, at a cost ol $7000. 

On motion of Alderman Bradlee, 

Ordered, That the Committee on Cemeteries be 
authorized to contract with some suitable person 
or persons for repairing the tombs on the Common 
Burial Ground at an expense notfexceeding $2000, 
to be charged to the appropriation for cemeteries. 

On motion of Alderman James, That the Super- 
intendent of Streets be authorized to reset the 
edge stones and pave the gutters on Williams 
street, from Washington street to Shawmut ave- 
nue ; also to macadamize the roadway of said street, 
at an estimated cost of $1200. 

Ordered, That the Chiet of Police notify the own- 
ers and abutters on Dartmouth street, at the north- 
west corner of Warren avenue, to lay sidewalks 
with brick. 



Ordered, That that the Chief of Police notify the 
owners and abutters on Pynchon street, from 
Washington to Centre street ; also the owners and 
abutters on Williams street, from Washington 
street to Shawmut avenue; also the owners and 
abutters on Cedar street, between Centre and 
Pynchon streets, to furnish edgestones and lay 
sidewalks. 

On motion of Alderman Fairbanks, 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Sewers be 
directed to construct a sewer in Mount Pleasant 
avenue ; also to extend the F street sewer between 
Seventh and Eighth streets. 

On motion of Alderman Seaver, 

Ordered, That the Committee on the Police be 
authorised to purchase a buggy wagon (or the 
use of the Chief of Police, at an expense not ex- 
ceeding $550, to be charged to the Appropriation 
for Police. 

Adjourned. 



98 



COMMON COUNCIL 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 

APRIL 22, 1869. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Common 
Council was held tbis evening at 7% o'clock, Wm 
G. Harris, the President, in the chair. 

PAPERS FROM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

The quarterly report of the City Physician was 
ordered to be placed on file. 

The order authorizing the Chairman of Commit- 
tee on Ferries to appear before thb Committee of 
the Legislature, to protect the city's interest con- 
cerning the East Boston Ferries, was passed, in 
concurrence. 

The order for payment of five hundred dollars to 
each of the Commissioners, for their services in 
relation to the annexation of Dorchester to this 
city, was referred to the Committee on Claims. 
The following orders were severally read once: 
Order for the repair and maintenance of the Pub- 
lic Bathing Houses, at an expense not exceeding 
$12,000 ; and to construct and maintain a Bathing 
House for men and boys at the Sectional Dock, 
East Boston, at an expense not exceeding $3000 ; 
and to employ assistance for the care and manage- 
ment of the several Bathing Houses. 

Orders to take the estates of Hannah Bradford, 
Isaac Packard and J. G. Kussell, for the purpose 
of widening Matthews street, the same having 
been surrendered to tue city. 

The Council concurred in'rel'erenceto Committee 
on Public Buildings of orders authorizing the pur- 
chase of land on Warren and Dudley streets, for 
the purpose of erecting a building thereon for 
Hook and Ladder Company No. 4 and a ward room 
for Ward Fourteen; said land not to cost more 
than $10,000, and for a loan of said amount to pay 
therefor. 

The non-concurrence in the recommitment by 
this Council of the order for the purchase ot fire 
annihilators for the station, eng ; ne, hose and hook 
and ladder houses, coming up for consideration, 

Mr. Osborn of Ward Six raised a question of or- 
der. If he did not distinctly state his motion to be 
for recommitment to the committee on the part 
of this branch, it was so designed, and he thought 
it was so understood. He did not suppose it was 
otherwise until he saw it stated in the proceedings 
of the other branch that the recommitment was 
non-concurred in. 

The Chair read the indorsement of reference to 
the Joint Special Committee. 

Mr. Osborn said he knew that the matter was 
referred to such a committee, last year, but the 
powers of that committee were exhausted, and it 
was not competent for the Council to refer the 
matter to a committee of the Board of Aldermen. 
If the report came irom a Joint Committee, the 
recommittal would carry it to such a committee, 
but not otherwise. 

The chair further read from the report of the 
Joint Comm ittee of this year, consisting of the 
committees of both branches on the Fire Depart- 
ment, acting together on the subject. 

Mr. Osborn had not so understood the matter. 
In the belief that it came from the Committee of 
the Fire Department of this branch, he last week 
moved a recommitment. 

He therefore moved that the Council recede 
from its reference at the last meeting, which was 
carried. 

On a lurther motion the order was referred to 
the Committee of the Fire Department on the part 
of the Council, with instructions to hear all par- 
ties who may wish to be heard. 

ELECTION OF SECOND ASSISTANT ASSESSORS. 

The election of Second Assistant Assessors was 
taken up. 

Mr. Gray of Ward Twelve withdrew the name of 
William Gallagher, a candidate from "Ward 
Twelve, and stated that he was authorized to sub- 
stitute the name of Tho mas Leavitt. 

Messrs. Nelson of Ward Nine, Poor of Ward 
Eleven and Hopkins of Ward Ten were appointed 
a committee to receive, sort and count the votes. 



The committee reported as follows : 

Whole number of votes 52 

Necessary to a choice 27 

Ward 4— William S. Whitney, 24; Alvin P. Rol- 
lins, 27; B. T. Gould, 1. 

Ward 5— John M. Maguire, 38 ; Pierce A. Doherty, 
14. 

Ward 10— Edward A. Hunting, 35; Frederick 
G. Pope, 16; B. T. Gould, 1. 

Ward 12— Thomas Hill, 4; Thomas Leavitt, 46 ; 
Wm. Gallagher, 1. 

Messrs. liollins and Maguire were declared to be 
elected in concurrence, and Messrs. Hunting and 
Leavitt in non-concurrence. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

The following orders were each read a second 
time and passed, the last-named by a vote of 51 
yeas, no nays: 

Order authorizing edgestones to be set, and the 
streets and sidewalks to be paved in the Church 
Street District, in accordance with the established 
grade. 

Order authorizing a loan of seventy-five thou- 
sand dollars to be added to the appropriation for 
the widening of Federal street, between the foot 
of Summer street and First street, South Boston. 
Printed City Document No. 3a, 1869. 

EXTENSION OF BROADWAY. 

Mr. Richards of Ward Eight, from the Commit- 
tee on Streets on the part of the Common Council, 
to whom were referred the resolve and orders 
from the Board of Aldermen for the extension of 
Broadway sixty feet in width from Federal street 
to Albany street, made a report in which they 
state they have given the subject the considera- 
tion and attention demanded by its importance, 
and regret their inability to reach a unanimous 
conclusion. 

The Committee state that the proposed exten- 
sion of Broadway is one of a series of projects 
more or less local in the benefits to be derived 
from them, which have been presented to this 
Council and its immediate predecessors, involving 
large expenditures of the public money, and there- 
by greatly increasing the public debt of the city; 
and as there are other and quite important and 
costly measures maturing, which must soon be 
submitted for our concurrent action, the Commit- 
tee have given the whole matter consideration as 
to its bearings upon the particular subject refer- 
red to them. 

The expense for land taken and damages occa- 
sioned by the extension on the high grade, is esti- 
mated by the Board of Aldermen at $226,586 17. 

Two estimates have been made by the City En- 
gineer for constructing the bridge over Fort Point 
Channel and the approaches, viz : 

First — The approaches on both sides of the chan- 
nel to he solid filling, with the exception of bridges 
over Foundry street and Lehigh street, $366,711 50. 

Second — lhe approaches on both sides of the 
channel to be partly on iron columns, $296,276. 

The present estimates for the extension are 
based upon th approaches being built on iron 
columns, and the amount of $550,000 named in the 
order to borrow, is made up as follows: 

Land damages $226,586 17 

Bridges and appioaches 296,276 00 

Grade damages 27,137 83 

Total $550,000 00 

The Committee cite in comparison, the report of 
the Committee of the Board of Aldermen of 1867, 
making the latest estimates $808,800, the land dam- 
ages amounting to $421,500. 
"On this it is remarked : 

A comparison of these figures exhibits the sin- 
gular fact that the estimates for this year are 
about $260,000 below those of the year 1867, nearly 
$200,000 being in the item for land damages, when, 
the fact is notorious that the value of real estate 
within the past year has been greatly enhanced. 

The committee say they are unable to furnish 
accurate estimates of their own, being obliged to 
base their calculations almost entirely upon in- 
formation furnished by the Board of Aldeimen. 
They, however, are of opinion, after a careful 
examination of the details, that the estimates are 
far below the actual cost of the extension, and in 
this they are sustained by the committee of this 
branch last year, which reported in favor ot the 
measure. 



APRIL 



2, 18 6 9 



99 



Admitting the correctness of the estimates, the 
question arises, "Will the extension of Broadway 
to Albany street aftcrd that relief or accommoda- 
tion to travel between South Boston and the city 
proper which will be at all commensurate with the 
outlay?" They are of the opinion that it will not. 

The aistance in a straight line from the head of 
State street to Federal street at Summer street is 
2100 feet; lro m the head ot State street to Albany 
street at Way street is 4550 feet ; from the head of 
State street to Dover street at Harrison avenue is 
5G50 feet. 

They think it beyond question that nearly all the 
travel from South Boston will come to the city prop- 
er over any avenue which reaches directly the point 
indicated upon Federal and Summer streets. And 
persons going to the southerly portion ot the city 
cannot be seriously inconvenienced by passing 
over Dover Street Bridge, which crosses Albany 
street at a point only 1100 feet distant from the 
proposed intersection of Broadway with that 
street. 

The streets connecting Albany street with Wash- 
ington street at the point where Broadway would 
intersect, will not remedy the discomfort experi- 
enced in Federal street. To obviate this difficulty 
the projectors of this extension contemplate a 
continuation of Broadway to Washington street; 
the additional cost of the continuation to this 
point was estimated by the Committee of 1867 
(City Document 98) at $684,100, making in the ag- 
gregate the startling sum of $1,402,900. 

The rapid increase in price ot landed property 
in this vicinity, and the erection of buildings up'in 
the line duiing the past year, must materially in- 
crease these figures. 

The committee refer to the large expenditures 
made necessary by the war, and to the necessity 
of the strictest economy consistent with the future 
progress and welfare of our city, and in view of 
the purchasing or taking large amounts of prop- 
erty at this extreme point of inflation and paying 
for it in bonds, which, at maturity, must be paid 
in gold, and for other reasons, a project so partial 
in its bearings upon the welfare of the whole city, 
of such magnitude if carried out as its projectors 
undoubtedly desire and intend, involving an ex- 
penditure of money vastly beyond the estimates 
now presented to us, and which has failed to re- 
ceive the favorable action ot either City Council 
since 1866, although it has annually been pertina- 
ciously pressed upon their consideration, should 
under existing circumstances, be deferred. 

The great increase of the city debt and the ne- 
cessity of completing projects which have been 
commenced, the committee remark upon these 
various projects requning many millions ot dol- 
lars. 

The filling of the flats on the northerly shore of 
South Boston, and the negotiations which are go- 
ing on for the use of these lands by railroad cor- 
porations, the committee believe will involve the 
building of the Northern avenue, to terminate at 
Oliver street, as now extended, and Eastern ave- 
nue, to terminate at the easterly end of Summer 
street, thus connecting the territory with Boston 
proper, at two central points, and with great thor- 
oughfares. When the streets at South Boston 
running at right angles with these avenues are ex- 
tended, new and direct meansof reaching the cen- 
tres of business, both wholesale and retail, will be 
furnished; and experience teaches that heavy or 
business travel, and generally light carriages, will 
follow the shortest and most direct routes. 

The opinion is expressed also that South Boston 
will not continue to be occupied for any considera- 
ble length of time for private residences, on ac- 
count of its favorable location for large manufac- 
turing establishments. 

The occupation ot the flats by the railroads be- 
ing placed beyond doubt, the building of the North- 
ern and Eastern avenues will be a necessity, and 
cannot be avoided or delayed without sacrificing 
the best interests of our citizens by retarding the 
growth and development of the business of the 
city. 

These reasons are believed to be sufficient to 
warrant the Council to delay action in this matter 
until we can have the whole plan for the improve- 
ment and enlargement ot the territory, including 
the proposed new avenues, placed before us. In 
conclusion the Committee say, they believe the 
proposed thoroughfare will not afford that accom- 
modation to the travel which the citizens of South 
Boston anticipate, and that the additional means 



of communication which are sure to be furnished 
in the not distant future in other localities, will 
entirely obviate any necessity for such a thorough- 
fare hereafter. They accordingly report that the 
resolve and orders ought not to pass. 

The report is signed by Joel Richards, J. Austin 
Rogers and Sewall B. Bond. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward Seven presented a minority 
report from the same committee, in which they 
say: 

The estimate for land damages, given in detail 
on page 8 ot City Doc. No. 31, is made by persons 
who have had an experience of many years in ap- 
praising the value of real estate and assessing 
damages caused by widening or extending streets, 
and whose judgment on such matters is not to be 
lightly set aside. After hearing their statements, 
and making a personal examination of the territo- 
ry covered by the extension, the undersigned have 
every reason to believe that their estimates are 
substantially correct. The estimates for building 
the bridges and approaches are made by the City 
Engineer, and have not been called in question by 
anyone. It may safely be presumed that the en- 
tire expense of making the extension from Tre- 
mont street to Albany street, including grade 
damages, building t.ie roadway and paving, will 
not exceed $600,000. 

A hearing was given by the Committee to parties 
interested, and a large number of persons re- 
sponded, presenting in the most convincing man- 
ner, the necessity for this additional thoroughfare 
to the continued prosperity of South Boston. The 
population of South Boston at the present time is 
about 42,000; more than one-sixth ot the entire 
population of the city. Its area, of upland is nine 
hundred acres, exceeding by two hundred and ten 
acres the original area of upland of the city proper. 
With the occupation of the flats on the northerly 
shore, South Boston will represent in area more 
than one-fourth of the whole city, including East 
Boston and the Highlands. 

The travel over the bridges for one day, gave the 
following result: 

Federal Street Bridge— Foot passengers 17,700 

Teams of all kinds 5,018 

Mt. Washington Avenue Bridge— Foot pas- 
sengers... 8,510 

Teams 3,840 

Dover Street Bridge— Foot passengers 11,128 

Teams 2,417 

Remarking upon the fact that 26,210 foot pas- 
sengers and 8858 teams pass over Federal 
street and Mount Washington avenue in a day, it 
is said to be obvious that some speedy relief is 
needed for the public travel. In the opening of 
the draw 7100 times in a year, blocks frequently 
occur to the travel in whifdi teams collect on either 
side for halt a mile. With the annexation of 
Dorchester, and the filling up of the large area in 
that direction, accommodations can be furnished 
only by an additional street located between 
Federal street and Dover street bridge. 

Extracts are given from the report of the Com- 
mittee of last year, on the value of property in 
South Boston, and the statement is made thatthe 
opponents of the measure have, almost without 
exception, admitted that the extension must take 
place sometime. To make such an admission, 
and yet to vote against immediate action, seems, 
in view of the immense expense to which the city 
has been subjected from the delay to widen and 
extend streets until the advance of business has 
rendered it unavoidable, an astonishing want of 
foresight. In the present instance, every year's 
delay must, of course, greatly augment the ex- 
pense. The minority do not think the condi- 
tion of the treasury forbids this measure of im- 
provement, and say it should be remembered that 
a large part of the sum which went to increase the 
debt last year, will be returned to the city treasury 
under the assessments for betterment, and go into 
the sinking tund tor the redemption of the debt. 

They think it cannot be pretended that this meas- 
ure will be less beneficial to the city than the wid- 
ening of Hanover or Federal street, and conclude 
as follows : 

"To us it seems clear that the public safety and 
convenience require that this additional thorough- 
fare t» South Boston should be built; that it can 
be buiit at less expense now than at any future 
time ; and that the plan proposed is the only one 
by which the accommodation required can be ob- 
tained." 



100 



COMMON COUNCIL. 



The passage of the resolve and order is accord- 
ingly recommended, and the report is signed by 
James J. Flynn and George H. Johnston. 

Mr. Ricnards moved that the report of the com- 
mittee he laid on the tahle, and that Thursday 
evening next be assigned for its consideration. 

Mr. IngalJs of Ward Twelve seconded the mo- 
tion, with the statement that no more important 
matter was likely to come before the Council, and 
none so important to the neople of South Boston. 
He did not wish to hurry it, ana asked nothing 
bur, what was right. It was not designed to make 
extended speeches, but the members of the Coun 
eil would be asked to go over the ground, and if 
thev thought the avenue was needed, they 
should vote for it. 

The motion tor assignment was carried. 

The report of the minority of the committee was 
at first ordered to be placed on file, when, on mo- 
tion of Mr. Flyun, a reconsideration was carried, 
and this leportwas also assigned for consideration 
on Thursday evening next. 

Mr. Flynn, from the Committee on Streets of the 
Common Council, to whom was reierred the re- 
solve ami order lor the widening of Bennet aven- 
ue, made a report, as Jollows: 

Bennet avenue runs from .Prince street to North 
Bennet street, a distance ot about 200 feet, and is 
the only opening between Bano". er and Sal m 
streets, which are 530 feet apart. The present 
width of the avenue is about &% feet. The plan of 
the Board of Aldermen contemplates widening to 
twenty feet, by taking 2037 square leet of land from 
estates on the southerly side, at an estimated 
expense of $11,051 50. The present avenue con- 
tains 1390 square feet, but the rights of the abut- 
ters therein will not ; it is understood, give them 
any claim upon the city for damages on account of 
the laving out as a public way. 

In accordance with the instructions of the coun- 
cil the Committee gave a hearing.to all persons 
interested in the proposed widening, and they also 
made a personal inspection of the present condi- 
tion of the avenue. It appeared from the evi- 
dence of the petitioners that all the owners on the 
northerly side were in favor of the widening and 
were willing to be assessed their proportion of the 
benefit accruing therefrom. Of the owners on the 
southerly side, portions of whose estates are taken 
lor the purpose, three are opposed to the widen- 
ing and one is in favor ot it. The assessors' valua- 
tion of the property on the avenue whose owners 
are in favor of the widening amounts to $30,000 ; 
value of property represented by the remonstrants 
$12,200. 

Mr. S. W.Mason, Master of the Eliot School 
stated that, in his opinion, nearly one-third, of the 
750 pupils in the Eliot School, which is about 
opposite the easterly end of Bennet avenue, were 
In the habit of passing through the avenue on 
their way to and from school, and that a larger 
proportion of the pupils ii the Hancock School, 
opposite the westerly end of the avenue, passed 
through it. The Hancock and Eliot School Dis- 
trict Committees have petitioned lor the widening 
with reference particularly to the accommodation 
of the scholars. 

The widening is also strongly urged by the Su- 
perintendent of Health and the Chiet Engineer of 
the Fire Department. The city carts for the col- 
lection of ofial and ashes cannot enter the avenue 
at present, and the men are obliged to carry all 
the refuse matter to Prince street or Bennet 
street. A large portion of the time during the 
winter, passage through the avenue on foot is ex- 
tremely difficult. The disadvantages under which 
the Fire Department labor to introduce their 
engines and hose carnages into the avenue, In 
case of fire near the centre, can he readily appre- 
ciated. 

The evidence of the remonstrants went to show 
that the public safety and convenience did not re- 
quire the widening; that the accommodation to 
public travel would be very slight ; that there were 
many narrow passageways in the city in a worse 
condition than this one; that if widened at all, it 
should be made forty feet in width, in order to 
pr jpeily accommodate the heavy travel. 

It appears to a majority of the committee that 
the preponderenee of evidence was very decidedly 
in la vor of the petitioners, and that the public in- 
terest would be promoted in a sufficient degree to 
warrant the expenditure required to carry out the 



improvement. The net cost to the city will proba 
bly not exceed $5000 or $6000, as the assessments 
for betterment will undoubtedly cover half the ex- 
pense. The majority would respectlully recom- 
mend the passage of the resolve and order. Said 
report was signed by James J. Flynn, George H. 
Johnston and Sewall B. Bond. 

The report was laid on the table and ordered to 
be printed. 

Mr. Richards, from the same committee, pre- 
sented a minority report, signed by himselt and 
J. Austin.Rogers, in which it is recommended that 
said Resolves and Orders be rejected, which was 
also laid on the table. 

Mr. Osborn of W ard Six. from the Committee on 
Ordinances, who were requested to prepare an or- 
nance establishing the office of Assistant City 
Clerk, in accordance with the provisions of chap- 
ter 72 of the acts of 1869, recommended the pas- 
sage of an accompanying ordinance. 

The ordinance provides for the appointment of 
such assistant by the City Clerk, to be confirmed 
by the Board of Aldermen, to be made in July the 
present year, and in January annually thereafter , 
and to be compensated for his services out of the 
appropriation for clerk hire. It shall be the duty 
of said assistant to assist in recording, indexing 
and certifying mortgages ot personal property, 
mechanic's liens, &c, and if necessary to make 
attestation of documents as provided in the act of 
1869, and perform all othei duties pertaining to the 
office ot City Clerk when so requested, or neces- 
sary. 

The ordinance was read once, and to an inquiry 
of Mr. Osborn, the chair stated that its provisions 
were such as required it to lie over under the rule 
for a second reading at the next meeting. 

On motion of Mr. Wadsworth of Ward Four, the 
order authorizing the Harbor Master to appoint an 
Assistant to take charge of the channel of the 
Roxbury canal was taken from the table. 

Mr. Wadsworth said as the order did not con- 
template the creation ot a new office, as he at first 
supposed, out simply authorized the Harbor Mas- 
ter to employ the gentleman who performed the 
same duties for the City of Koxbury, he hoped it 
would pass. 

Mr. Snow of Ward Eleven hiGuired who per- 
formed the duties last year. 

Mi . Ryan of Ward Thirteen said the gentleman 
now acting was employed by the city last year, 
and it was designed that the Harbor Master should 
have the control of him. lhi< gentleman was an 
old sea captain who was employed bv the city of 
Koxbury in the same duties for several years at a> 
salary of $200 or $300. 

Mr. Rich of Ward Fourteen was ot the opinion 
that il the order was designed to establish a new 
office, it would be better to refer the matter to the 
Committee on Ordinances, to report an ordinance 
to that effect. He moved that such a reference be 
made. 

Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteen thought this was too 
small a matter to regulate by ordinance. The Harbor 
Master had control of such matters, and this 
was but a branch of his office. The wboJe amount 
involved was not more than $200, and it would be 
making a mountain out of a molehill to pass an. 
ordinance for establishing such an insignificant 
office. It would be better to nass the order as it 
eaine from the Board of Aldeiinen. 

The motion to refer to the Committee on Ordi- 
nances was lost, when the order was passed. 

Mr. Ingalls of Ward Twelve moved that when 
the Council adjourned it would be to a quarter to 
four o'clock on Thursday next, to proceed to view 
the route of the extension of Broadway. Carried. 

A petition was presented from John Mack, for 
extension ot time required for building on a lot 
purchased of the city on Concord street. Referred 
to the Committee on Public i^ands. 

Mr. Wadsworth of Ward Four offered an order, 
which was read twice and passed, as follows: 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Sewers be 
directed, under the advice of the Joint Special 
Committee on the Church Street District, to lay 
sewers and establish a complete system of drain- 
age for said district, the expense for doing said 
work to be charged to the appropriation for said 
district. 

On motion of Mr. Pickering of Ward Fourteen, 
8 o'clock was fixed as the hour of meeting of the 
regular sessions of the Council. 
AiJjourned. 



101 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 
APRIL 24, 1869. 



At a special meeting of the Boarr 1 , at noon to- 
day, Mayor Sburtleff presiding, it was ordered 
that the Chief of Police keep clear from all ob- 
structions the streets through which the Odd Fel- 
lows procession will pass on Monday next. 

Adjourned. 



Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 
APRIL 26, 1869. 



The regular weekly Meeting of the Board of 
Aldermen was held this afternoon at 4 o'clock, 
Mayor Shurtleft presiding. 

APPOINTMENTS MADE AND CONFIRMED. 

Special Police Officer, mifiout Pay — Abraham C. 
Mace, for duty in tne immediate neighborhood of 
Commonwealth avenue ; Charles ll". Wright, for 
duty in Commonwealth avenue, Marlboro, Arling- 
ton'and Berkeley streets. 

Fire Department. Joseph D. Brown, as member 
ot Engine Co. No. 8; Geo. W. Frost, as a member 
of Hook & Ladder Co. No. 4. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

Hiram Stearns and others, that Clarendon 
street, between Appieton street and Columbus 
avenue, be accepted. 

Erastus B. Badger, for apportionment of Bowker 
street betterment into three parts. 

George Gardner tor apportionment of Avon 
street betterments into three parts. 

W. H. Wentworth, for apportionment of Bowker 
street betterment into three parts. 

Jordan & Marsh, that the assessment of better- 
ments on Avon street be apportioned into three 
parts. 

E.W.James and others, that Auburn street be 
extended to Leverett street. 

Francis D. Stedman and others, that Lovcring 
place be latd out as a public highway. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Streets- 
Joseph Nickerson and others, that Providence 
street from Church street to Berkeley street, be 
graded and put in order. 

Boston & Maine Railroad Company that the 
streets adjacent to their passenger station in Hay- 
mrirket square, may be put in order. 

J. W atson Taylor, for leave to cut down a tree at 
27 Forest street. 

G. S. Hillard and others, that Xreraont street, 
from Winter to Avon street, be paved with Nicol- 
son pavement. 

Beals, Greene & Co., to be paid for damages 
caused by change of grade of Water and Devon- 
shire streets. 

C. B. Goodrich and others, that portions of Tre- 
montand Avon streets be paved with the Stafford 
pavement. 

Freeman Smith and others, that Bradford street 
be repaired and put in order. 

J. G. Sanderson and others, that Myrtle street, 
from Hancock to Joy street, be paved with wood. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Paving. 

John Quinn, for leave to erect a stable on Broad- 
way, between K and L streets. 

Wilson & Buzzell, for leave to construct a stable 
at the corner of Federal and Alger streets. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Health. 

Jarvis W. Dean and others, that a sewer be laid 
in Eustis street, formerly Orchard street. 

Harriet M. Miles, for a sewer in Forest street 
and Mount Pleasant avenue to Dudley street. 

B. B. Brown and others, for a sewer in Gates 
street. 

Severally referred to the Committe on Sewers. 

Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company for 
the use of Faneuil Hall, 7th of June next. 

Referred to Camthittee on Faneuil Hall. . 



C. H. Hovey and others, for a gas lamp in Circuit 
and Kegeut "streets. Referred to Committee on 
Lamps. 

Of the several Savings Banks of this city, that 
registered bonds be substituted for City of Boston 
coupon bonds. Keterred to Committee on Fi- 
nance. 

Company K, First Regiment Infantry, tor addi- 
tional allowance for armory rent, and for approval 
of armory at 151 Broadway. Referred to Com- 
mittee on Armories. 

National Lancers, for the use of Faneuil Hall, on 
June 14 and 15. Referred to Committee on Fan- 
euil Hall. 

Sundry citizens, on behalf J. P. Greene, for 
leave to bavo a periodical stand at the corner of 
Washington and Avon streets. Keterred to Com- 
mittee on Licenses. 

Robert Simpson, Stephen P, Kinsley, Henry A, 
Drake, Albert H. Hopkins, Joseph H, Lawrence, 
William Seaver, Jr., and 399 others, that ibe bells 
may be rung in Boston Highlands morning, noon 
and evening. Keferred to Committee on Bells, 
&c. 

NOTICES OF INTENTION TO BUII..D. 

E. & C H. Smith, 637 and 639 Tremont street; N . 
J. Bradlee, 17G Tremont street; Spenceley & Karl, 
Kendall street; John Mahony, Prentiss street; 
Stoddaid & Wilcutt, corner of iremont and Dover 
streets; Richardson & Young, 8 Derne street; L. 
Bartlett, 129 Brookline street; J. P. Power, Bread- 
way, between H and I streets; Miller & Horton, 
Third street, between F and Dorchester street; S, 
& A. K. Whittier, Harrison avenue; F. B. Winter, 
43 to 49 Hanover street; James Baker, corner of 
Paris and Decatur streets; Wilson & Buzzell, 
Alger street; John Shea, 323 Federal street; 
P. S. Quirk, corner cf P and Fourth streets; 
John RJcSweeney, Broadway, between A and 
R streets; S. J. F. Thayer, 421 and 423 
Broadway, between F and Dorchester streets; C, 
11. Taggard, Grove stieet, between Cambridge and 
Phillips streets; Uobert Wright, corner of Deca- 
tur and London streets; Weub& Ward, I street, 
between Second and Third streets^ Odiorne & 
Wheeler, corner of Washington and Groton 
streets; A.J.Preble, Saratoga street, near Pres- 
cott stieet; Ed ward Hennessey, corner of B and 
Third sweets. Severally referred to the Commit- 
tee ou Streets. 

! HAFWEIGHER, EAST BOSTON SCAJLES. 

J. W. Kimball, Hay weigher, East Boston scales, 
reported as fees received lor the quarter ending 
March 31, $39 43, two-fifths of which amount, $15 77, 
has been paid to the City Treasurer. Read and or- 
dered to be sent down. 

HEARINGS OS ORDERS OF NOTICE. 

The hearing on the several orders of notice on 
the proposed construction of a sewer in Winthrop 
street, on the proposed construction of a sewer in 
-Sixth street, on the proposed laying out and ac- 
ceptance of Dartmouth street, and on the petition 
of H. M. Wilson, of the intention of the Board to 
widen Boylston street, were taken up. No one ap- 
pearing m either case, the several reports were re- 
committed. 

The hearing on the order of notice, on petition 
of Smith & Lovett, for leave to put up a steam en- 
gine at 127 Albany street, was taken up. 

A remonstraaee of George E. Houghton and 
others against the same was presented, and Thos.. 
-J. Welch, one of the remonstrants, expressed a 
wish to be heard. 

On motion ot Alderman Hawes, the report was 
recommitted, with instructions to give the parties 
a bearing on Friday next, 10 o'clock. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

The following order was considered on its final 
passage: 

Ordered, That Vernon street be extended., from 
Cabot street to Tremont street, by taking land be- 
longing to Wm. H. Honeywell and James McMa- 
hon, amounting to 7539 square feet; also 1717 
square feet, belonging to Laban S. Beecher; also 
land belonging to the city of Boston, containing 
1028 square feet; also 2257 square feet of land be- 
longing to Laban S. Beecher; and a parcel of land 
belonging to persons unknown, containing 18.664 
square feet, the whole expense amounting to 
$7092.. 

Alderman Talbot stated that by cutting, through 
a short. "space a continuous -street would be made . 
from'Washington street to Tremont strset, there 




18 6 9 



103 



Ibe order was read a second time and passed. 

COMMON COUNCIL PAPERS 

The motion to non-concur was carried. 

ELECTION OF SECOND ASSISTANT ASSESSORS. 

Hul?fn% 4 ? redenCk G - P °P e ^; Faward A. 

4 Ward Twelve-Thomas Hill, 8; Thomas Leavitt, 

ed^ S n r u S ^ P c'rou a r l : d en H ce I . 1WeredeClaredt0 be elect ~ 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Alderman White, from the Committee on T i 

FSf ep01 ' tedln favor of alicens^to^ePeak 
Family to give concerts at the Tremont Temoie • of 

Ha'eSffi R Zl a T nin * »*Mwm P al \?9 
i lfi BtT S?f" t'e^erally accepted. 

n«tSi maB F nite also reported llcensfs to three 
newsboys and two bootblacks, to sundry persons 
as common victuallers, innholders, for P Zm 
stands, bil Hard saloons dealers in seconiSd 

e% r al?y e ac a ce^d? PerS «"*«*«** »SS 
™^ ldelman Talb ot, from the Committee on Streets 
reported no action necessary on sundry cotVces of 
intention to build. Severally accepted! 
Mo,.tT nan Sea Y er - »i'«m the Committee on the 
Market, reported in favor of the transfer of half 

ic e cepted! 8tanS84 aDd86 Faa ^il H S an Marked 

Alderman White, from the Committee on Heilth 

Ka P vv n te fo: n ,5 aVOr t°'' gran , tin e tne Petkfonrf Owen" 
tor H^iU?i a c Ve - t0 / pnnk i e ce,taln streets at Bos- 
ton Highlands ; in favor of the erection of a stable 

oon^rtJ?" 1 fo « r f b °rses by Frost & Co on Stan- 
hope street j no action necessary on the petition 

?/o™ 5 n ™> a i IMMh , a * the cit y WOUJd defemhim 
cepted. brou £ uc gainst him. Severally ac- 

Alderman White also reported an order which 

«24 P n a n S rfw° r ^ e ab . atfiment of ^ assessment of 
S, oi 0n / ffl ' Manning, for the removal of a nui- 
sance in Orange court. 

in^ ld fn m , a , B James^froiii the Committee on Pav- 
te' e P°"« d le f av e to withdraw on petition ot 
«iToJ^ Cey ^ ope J tor Payment of damages caused by 
£M, ° f grad ? - of F,rst streel 9 also leave to 
SS™' " Petition of William k Emerson, for 
g V?i damages on Albany street. 

the Committee reported in favor of the petition 
r"oin UgU8 ^ sBaC01 l' tllat]eave lje granted to cut 
teaUyac e C Vted?° nt ° f Wo ' 13 Aubu - street. 
H ^ rman White, from the Committee on 
SSSS l A«! eporte ft."i? order for tne abatement ot 
SKS^ig? E, S htn - Emerald and Tremont 
streets and Shawinut avenue. Adopted. 
™i7„i erman Wnite . 'rom the same Committee, to 
PW?^« S referred the communication of the City 
miSi « ~I. re Kf cttI !F the use of a PO^onous paste, 
mad a ,A re , P K 0rt o that the manufacturer of said paste 
anv1„^° ■ he Committee that he was not aware of 
S n J™' ou « effects arising from the use of the 
aS^i he having discontinued the use of 
ceptei ' D ° tUrtner action is required. Ac- 



PUBLIC PARK AT CHESTNUT HILL RESERVOIR. 

a report yg the Same as a P ublic P ar k, made 

tni,!L,i f f J, tB T e Purchase, authority should be ob- 

mZt^V^t^^ u > takeWh Unds^s 
may "u requned, under the ritriit ot pmin^nt h« 

eToToi "ant 6 oS S" # J ' W ^nffidto p^ 

^SOrfF^- S '^-e P red 

lowing ft : leCCOmujeild tue Parage of the foil 
Ordered, That His Honor the Mavor beremiP«to,i 

;K«v G *sr? Court ?™SSSSSS 

purclW n ^il i n „ Januar y. 1870, for an act to 
HH1 Reseivo^r ^ H n , S ln th * e J, ieinit - V of Phestnut 
park a^na for ThPtb,.^ y ° Ut the - same a « a public 
voramirh ! , t l ,llther protection ot said Beaer- 

gS^fcffiSer^el;^ Sald Petit,0n ,,e 
Ordered, That the Cochituate Water Board ho 

cftv J i e n St ? d p t0 - b0n -i £UCU lots of laud Squired by thl 
S the vicinity of Chestnut Hill Keservoir as 
may be offered to them ui.on reasonable tev.n* 
and report the same to the Citv CouncH & ' 

passed reP ° r ' WaS acce P ted aiid the orders were 

INVITATIONS TO MUSICAL FESTIVAL. 

«,£!« T"* 11 ,. Whlte ' from tlle iP&i fecial com- 
"omthe K V Y P°n?t WaS / eferrer| the communication 
«S ?,}% Executive Committee of citizens, in rela- 
^ho rt the m e ? e 1 ptl0I J al >d entertainment of distin- 
guished officials who may attend the National 
W Jubilee in this city in June remade a re- 
port recommending the passage of the following . 

Ordered That the Joint Special Committee on 
the Musical Festival be authorised to tender tb? 

mi&'nffi,. ° f t - he ^ ^ ^stinguished civil and 
militaiy officers invited by them to attend the 
™°? a Pe! J Ce J » bil ee,the%xpense attending the 

de ra tTexpet a eF dt0theapPr0pria tor ?nc,! 

The order was read twice and passed. 
Alderman Seaver moved a reconsideration of the 
order passed at the last meeting of the Board di 
recline the Auditor of Accounts to exam ne 'the 
Company? S * &C ' ° f the EaSt B °ston Ferry 

In support of the motion the mover said that in 
an interview with the Auditor he was informed 
that on account of the press of business in his of- 
nce, in closing up the accounts for the financial 
year, he could not attend to the matter of the or- 
der. Should the motion prevail, an order would 
be offered as a substitute. 

The motion prevailed and the following order 
was offered und passed: 8 

Ordered, That the Committee on Ferries be au- 
thorized to examine and inspect the books, ac- 
counts, vouchers and records of the Fast Boston 
terry Company, with a view to ascertain the act- 
ual cost ot the property at present owned bv said 
company, and the amount at which said property 
now stands on the company's books ; also such in- 
tormation as to deta'ls in reference to bonds 
stocks, notes and otherwise, as they shall deem 
expedient; with authority to employ such assist- 
ance as they may require to accomplish the obiect 
—the expense to be charged to the appropriations 
for ,the county ot Suffolk. 

Alderman Jame3 offered the followine order 
which was passed: 

Whereas, in the opinion of this Board, the safety 
and convenience of the inhabitants require that 
Cambridge street should be repaved, it is hereby 

Ordered That due notice be given to the Cam- 
bridge Railroad Company to pave the spac^ be- 
tween their rails and three feet outside thereof on 
sali Cambridge £treet, from Blossom street to 



103 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



North Grove street, with small granite blocks; 
said work to be done at such time as the Super- 
intendent of Streets shall direct, by pavers ap- 
proved by him and to his entire satisfaction. 

OEDEES P/.SSED. 

On motion of Alderman James, 

Ordered, That the street extending from Wash- 
ington street to Albany street, a part of which has 
heretofore been called Chester Park, and a part of 
it East Chester Park, be hereafter callefl and known 
as East Chester park, and that the Superintendent 
of Streets be directed to renumber said street, 
commencing the numbers at Washington sti eet. 

Ordered. 'that the Committee on Jt'avine: be au- 
thorized t<-> visit New York, Chicago and other 
cities tor general information, the expense there- 
of, together with the expense heretofore incurred 
by the committee in visiting New York for the 
purchase of paving block, not exceeding the sum 
ot $1000, to be charged to the appropriation for 
paving. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be 
authorized to remove the trees on Tyler and 
Hudson streets that proiect over the line of the 
edgestones into the roadway of said streets, so as 
to interfere with ana endanger the passage of 
vehicles. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be 
authorized, under the direction of the Committee 
on Paving, to build a wooden trussed biidge over 
the tracks of the Bo3ton & Albany and Boston & 
Providence Railroads on Dartmouth street, at an 
expense not exceeding $25,000, to be charged to 
the Appropriation for Paving. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be 
authorized to pave Waltham street between Wash- 
ington street and Harrison avenue, at an estimated 
expense of $2500. 

Ordered,Tbat the Superintendent of Streets be 
authorized to set edgestones, nave the gutters and 
macadamize the roadway on Harrison avenue, be- 
tween Northampton and Eustis streets; also to 
build the necessary cesspools, at an estimated ex- 
pense of $8500. 

Ordered, That the Chief of Police be directed to 
notify the owners and abutters on Waltham street, 
betwien Washington street and Harrison avenue, 
to furnish edgestones and lav sidewalks with 
brick; also to notify the owners and abutters on 
Swftt street to furnish edgestones and lay side- 
walks with brick. 

Ordered, That the Chief of Police be directed to 
notify an abutter, 71 East Brookline street, to lay 
sidewalks witn brick; also, to notify the owners 



and abutters on Montgomery street to furnish 
edgestones and lay sidewalks with brick. 

On motion ot Alderman Talbot, 

Ordered, That the safety and convenience of the 
city requires the laying out of Dartmouth street, 
from Columbus avenue to St. James avenue, at no 
expense to the city. 

Ordered, That there be paid to Gustoff Daniel- 
son and Andrew Johnson $4000 tor damages as les- 
sees of wharf and building No. 462 Federal street 
(belonging to the city), ea used by the widening of 
said street, by a resolve approved June 6, 1868. 

Ordered, That the Committee on Laying Out and 
Widening Streets, be and they hereby are author- 
ized to sell at public auction, at such time as they 
shall deem expedient, the balance of the vV right 
estate, so called, left after the widening of federal 
street, and that the proceeds of the same be paid 
into the City Treasury. 

On motion of Alderman Fairbanks, 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Sewers be 
authorized to construct a sewer in D stree t, be- 
tween Uaxter and Old Colony streets, and report a 
schedule of the expense to this Board. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Sewers be- 
authorized to construct a sewer in Monmouth, 
street. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Sewers be 
authorized to construct a sewer in Harrison ave- 
nue, between Dover street and Ashland place. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Sewers be 
authorized to construct a sewer in Warren 
street, between Moreland and Montrose streets. 

On motion of Alderman Bradlee, 

Ordered, That the Joint Special Committee on 
Petitions to the Legislature be authorized to ap- 
pear before the Committee of the Legislature and 
to take such action as they deem necessary to 
protect the city interests in the matter of the "ex- 
tension of the'Bostori & Albany Railroad to the 
South Boston shore. 

ORDERS OF NOTIOIC. 

On the proposed laying out and widening of 
Ward street, between Dorchester and Preble- 
streets. Hearing Monday, May 10, 4 P. M. 

On the proposed construction of a sewer ins 
Eighth street, between Gates street and Old Har- 
bor street, and in Old Harbor street, between Tel- 
egraph and Eighth streets. Heaiine Monday, 
Mays, 4 P.M. 

On the proposed construction of a sewer in 
Ninth street, from Lake street to E street. Hear- 
ing Monday, May 3, 4 P. M. 

Adjourned. 






104 



COMMON COUNCIL, 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 
APRIL 29, 1869. 



At a special meeting of the Board of Aldermen 
at noon today, Alderman James in tbe chair, and 
every member present, Alderman Bichards, from 
the Joint Standing Committee on Public Build- 
ings, (who were directed to obtain plans and esti- 
mates for the enlargement of the Public Library 
building on Koylston street,) presented a report 
stating that after consultation with tbe Trustees 
ot the'Public Library, and a careful examination 
of the premises, the Committee are of opinion tbat 
the present building is entirely unsuited to the 
present and future wants of tbe library. 

The committee say, "it is not only too small, but 
being situated on one of the busiest thorough lares 
of the city, and being hercmed in by tall buildings, 
it lacks the three essential requisites tor a library, 
viz: I Quietness, light, and ventilation, and 
these could not be gained by any enlargement 
or alteration of the building. The enlarge- 
ment of tbe building would necessitate 
the purchase of additional land, and 
in view of the high price ot real estate in that 
vicinity, they are of the opinion that the advan- 
tages gained would not warrant the heavy expen- 
diture. The present building could be sold lor a 
sum almost, if not quite sufficient to erect a new 
building on a location better adapted to the wants 
of the library, and such a location, they believe, 
can be found on the Commonwealths land." 

The Committee therefore recommended the pass- 
age of an order authorizing His Honor the 
Mayor to petition the Legislature tor a grant of a 
lot of land on the Back Bay, so-called, suitable for 
the location of a building to be used as a Public 
Library. 

The report was accepted, and the order adopted 
by a unanimous vote. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 

APRIL 29, 1889. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Common 
Council was held at a quarter to 4 o'clock, this af- 
ternoon, William G. Harris, the President, in the 
chair. 

PAPERS FROM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

Quarterly reports were ordered to be placed on 
file. 

Petitions from the Board ot Aldermen were re- 
lerred in concurrence. 

Tbe order for the sale of the Wright estate, on 
Federal street, was parsed in concurrence. 

The Couucil adjourned to 8 o'clock. 

In tbe interval, the members visited the route of 
the proposed extension of Broadway, from Federal 
street to Albany street. 

EXTENSION OF BROADWAY. 

On reassembling at 8 o'clock, on motion of Mr. 
Ingalls of Ward 12 the Council proceeded to the 
immediate consideration of the subject of the ex- 
tension of Broadway. 

On motion of Mr. Ingalls. the reports of the ma- 
jority and minority of the committee were laia on 
the table, and the orders for the extension of 
Broadway were taken up and read, the question 
being upon their passage. 

Mr. Ingalls, in advocating the orders, stated that 
perhaps it would be as well not to say anything 
on the subject, his faith being strong in the as- 
sumption that every member of the Council lttlly 
understood the matter. There was not a person 



in his district but had a great interest in the ex- 
tension, and desired its accomplishment, and the 
members of the Council had gone over the ground 
and seen the necessity of it. There were, however, 
some facts which he wished to present, and some 
statements in the report of the majority of the 
committee which should be replied to. He knew 
that the members of tbe committee did not intend 
to do a wrong, but they had made some state- 
ments not in accordance with facts, and these 
statements he wished to controvert. 

In examining the report of the majority, he con- 
sidered it unfair that this subject should be tied 
up with others, and not considered on its own 
merits. The first objection made by the majority 
is that of the reduction of land damages of $2G0.- 
000 below those of the year 1867, which they pro- 
fess not to understaad. He had in his hands the 
report of tbe Committee ot the Board ot Alder- 
men m 1867, and found no difficulty in clearly un- 
derstanding the matter. lie bad gone over tbe 
estimates, once, twice, three times, and if any one 
else would go over the figures, they would find 
that instead of the large amount of $260,000, there 
was only a difference of §20,000. 

The Committee say they are unable to furnish any 
estimates of their own. They might have done so 
if they so desired, for they could have called be- 
fore them parties competent to furnish all the es- 
timates they needed. He proposed to give some 
statements on the subject, and unless facts and fig- 
ures lied, and he had never known them to, it would 
be (bund that the estimates of land damages were 
above the real amount. Many of the items in the 
account of land damages we're cited by Mr. In- 
galls, with a comparison of the value assessed for 
taxation during several years. The aggregate 
amount in the value of land to be taken, with the 
estimated damages to owners of estates, was given 
as $2^6,586 17. This property was taxed in 1864 
for $79,071 41; in 1865, $78,874 41; in 1866, $83,052 
20; in 18(7, $83,052 20; in 1868, $80,300 86. 

In considering the question of what benefit this 
avenue will be to South Boston, the figures of dis- 
tance as given by the committee were called in 
question. Instead ot taking the measurements ot 
the committee as stated oy them, by measuring 
from the foot of Broadway to the Old State House, 
by way of Federal street, and measuring the dis- 
tance by Albany and Kingston streets, the last is 
but 150 feet further. 

Taking the measurements from the foot of 
Broadway through Federal street, and by the pro- 
posed avsnue to Way street the distances are 
about equal to the City Hall; measuring the dis- 
tance to the corner of Summer and Washington 
streets, and the new avenue will be found to be 
much nearer than the old line through Federal 
street. Tbe figures as given by the Committee 
were pronounced to be unfair, and it was easy to 
see the fallacy of them. 

Objection was also made by Mr. Ingalls to tbe 
bringing in or" remarks upon tne war and upon the 
financial matters of tbe country. If there had 
been an increase ot the city debt by the last City 
Council, that Council alone were responsible for it. 
It was not a qu stion as to what projects the city 
was committed to. The fact that the city was re- 
quired to spend millions of dollais for the widen- 
ing of Washington and other streets, and that the 
expense was largely increased by delay, was a suf- 
ficient argument against the suggestion of the 
Commute that this project should be postponed 
fur thenrrsent. 

Mr. Ingalls referred to the prediction of the 
committee that South Boston was not to remain 
long as a place of residences. After the visit of 
the members of the Council to the localities occu- 
pied as the residences of hard-working men, he 
would leave them to judge whether those preaic- 
dictions were likely to be verified. 

It had been made a bugbear also to represent 
that the extension would be an avenue up in the 
air. The actual fact shows that the rise from 
Federal to Foundry street would be but seven 
feet, m a distance of 240 feet. Tbe rise would be 
about the same as the rise in Bromfield street 
from Washington to Tremont streets. From 
Foundry street the elevation would be on pillars 
for 360 feet, and on the other side the trade would 
be a little more. Albany street at the bridge over 
the railroad was much above the grade of that 
street, and with the raising of the grade to corres- 
pond, the grade from the new avenue would be 
nearly on a level with the street. 



APRIL 2 9 



18 6 9 



105 



The question has been asked why not cross the 
railroad and channel at grade. A policeman sta- 
tioned at this point one day from eight o'clock in 
the morning to six o'clock in the evening, counted 
the passing of 141 locomotives, about one in every 
four minutes. By crossing at grade, one-half the 
time would be taken up. It was urged also that 
Dover street and the bridge might be widened. 
This would require a longer time for opening and 
shutting the gates at the railroad crossing, and in 
opening and shutting the draws of the bridge. At 
this crossing 123 trains or locomotives had been 
counted in a day. 

Mr. Ingalls cited tbe figures giving the statistics 
of travel over the various avenues to South Bos- 
ton, and spoke of the inconvenience now experi- 
enced in waiting for trains or for the passage of 
vessels through the draws. Federal street was 
now objectionable from being a border street, 
necessarily diny, and an application was pending 
before the Legislature and the Hoard of Aldermen 
to allow the trains of the Boston & Albany Rail- 
road to cross that street. It was declared that tbe 
interests of commerce required it. Kemarking 
further upon the interests ot the large number of 
the working classes, who demanded further facili- 
ties tor reaching thia portion of the city, the hope 
was expressed that their demands would be fairly 
and justly considered. 

In conclusion, Mr. Ingalls said the people of 
South Boston simply asked to be treated fairly, on 
the good judgment of the members of the Council. 
Tbey asked only that the rule of judgment should 
be applied to them in doing unto others as they 
would be done by. They had no fears about the 
result if that rule -/as applied to this case. 
. Mr. Wadsworth of Ward Four said he did not 
suppose the Council would want to vote on the 
question until something was heard on the other 
side. He had wi«hed in the first place to call the 
attention of the Council to the structure. It is a 
bridge some 1500 feet in length, beginning at Fed- 
eial street and landing at Albany street. The 
bridge cannot be entered between the termini. 
About two-thirds of it are over land, and one-third 
over the water. At Albany street it is four feet 
above the grade, and will require regrading of all 
the streets connecting with it in that vicinity. 

The bridge is said to be for light travel, by foot 
passengers and by light vehicles. If a count had 
been made ot the light vehicles which came over 
from Souih Boston, he believed it would have been 
very small, for there are not many people in South 
Boston who keep their own vehicles for the pur- 
pose of riding to this part of the city. Something 
was said about poor people shivering in the cold. 
Place those people high up in the air on this 
bridge and it would be seen how great would be 
their shivering in the cold. 

The expense of this avenue will be large. The 
gentleman had said the amount was placed high. 
The amount put down tor contingencies was S200,- 
000. Take the same estimate tor the whole dis- 
tance as compared with the Federal street esti- 
mate, and it will be seen that sixty per cent, must 
be added. This will bring the amount up to $1,- 
492,256, and in its extension to the Common, 
eventually, the whole cost will be $3,000,000. 
The estimate of the cost of the Chestnut Hill 
reservoir was $900,000, and tbe cost will be 
nearly $2,000,000. And so it is of all other esti- 
mates. The object in the first place is to get an 
appropriation, trusting that when an enterprise is 
commenced, no matter how much will be the cost, 
it will be carried out. 

The bridge will be a further Destruction to the 
channel. He agreed that it would be impractica- 
ble to cross at grade. There will be other damages 
from injury to wharf property in that vicinity. 
All the wharves beyond, to thesouth,wi)l be injur- 
ed by it. As to the conveniences afforded to reach 
the city, Dover street aiTords more conveniences 
to all parts of the South End and Back Bay than 
the proposed avenue. There is Federal street 
which we are now widening, and which when com- 
pleted will afford more than double its present ad- 
vantages. So also Mount "Washington avenue 
affords conveniences. These three avenues afford 
all the facilities that are needed at the present 
time. 

Federal street, he contended, was much more 
convenient and direct for down town travel than 
the new avenue could be. The city had already 
granted a right to build a street from Fine Island 
to South Boston. That will be the street for com- 



munication from South Boston to Roxbury. The 
filling ot the flats will necessitate the building of 
two new avenues to Broad street. The proposed 
avenue, if built, he doubted not would be wished 
out of the way in five or ten years. 

The gentleman from W ard Twelve had objected 
to Federal street as a border street, and necessa- 
rily dirty. Charles and Causeway streets are bor- 
der streets, but they are not dirty. So also was 
Commercial street a bolder street, but that was 
not particularly dirty for a street situated as that 
street is. 

Sir. Keith of Ward Fifteen, in view of the im- 
portance ot the subject, as much as any which can 
come before the Council the present year, could 
not refrain from saying something. Two weeks 
ago his views were the same as last year, and the 
arguments and inferences, as they then existed, 
were vabd. If tne arguments of the majority of 
the committee were correct, he should still op- 
pose the extension. Having given much atten- 
tion to this subject of late, he had come to the 
conclusion that his former opinions were errone- 
ous. The first epiestion to be considered was— Does 
the public necessity and convenience require the 
laying out oi a highway? That settled, tbe work 
must oe accomplished, no matter if attended with 
great expense. 

The only portion of the city with which South 
Boston can be compared, is that of the Highlands, 
and yet the comparison is not complete. The pop- 
ulation of these two sections is about the same. 
Between the city proper and the Highlands there 
are six avenues, wide and spacious, while to South 
Boston there are but three. In point of fact there 
are virtually but two, for most of the distance, and 
these liable to great obstruction. 

Turning to the matter of filling the South Bos- 
ton flats,"he said there were not ten men in this 
Council who had an appreciation ot the extent of 
these flats. When these flats were all filled, 
amounting to 900 acres — greater than the pres- 
ent amount of territory in South Boston— 
and taking into consideration the oostruc- 
tion to the present avenues by railroads; 
considering also that when these flats are 
occupied by these railroads, the obstructions 
will be greatly multiplied; taking also into con- 
sideration the anticipated business on these new 
lands thus occupied, and it will be found that the 
new avenues to be built across tide water will 
hardly he sufficient for the accommodation of the 
business which is created by the filling «f these 
flats, without providing for the wants of the peo- 
ple otherwise. 

In regard to the making of new avenues, he had 
heard of the Eastern avenue for fifteen years, and 
yet not a stake bad been driven towards the build- 
ing of it. The State had been twelve years in fill- 
ing up 100 acres in the Back Bay, and the Water 
Power Company had been nine years infilling up 
200 acres. The filling at South Boston would be 
much more difficult, requiring a sea wall of two 
miles. This would require five years for building, 
and then the filling must be slow. When these 
flats are filled up, all ot the avenues which can be 
constructed will be needed for the business of that 
territory. In the mean time, how is it possible for 
the people of South Boston, already overcrowded 
with travel, to be accommodated with the largely 
added population and increasing business? 

If a new avenue is to be made, the proposed one 
is favorable, at a point where the channel is the 
narrowest. Last year he was opposed to this 
route because it was not proposed to construct it 
at grade. He bad not then learned the amount ot 
obstruction which the crossing of the railroad at 
grade would occasion, and which must render it 
almost if not quite impracticable, for it had heen 
ascertained that 123 trains had passed this point 
daily. 

Mr. Keith considered the question of damages 
and tbe cost of the avenue, lie was satisfied on 
a careful examination of the subject that the esti- 
mates were fair and were to be relied upon. Diffi- 
culties which had been presented to his mind and 
which still troubled the gentleman from Waid 
Four, by cutting across estates and streets diagon- 
ally, he had found a solu'ion of, and this he would 
indicate. When this avenue reaches Albany street, 
a good avenue was afforded down that, street and 
Kingston street, which was to be widened to Sum- 
mer street. It it was necessary to carry the ave- 
nue to Washington street and tho Back Bay, by 
reaching Harrison avenue through Way street, 



106 



COMMON COUNCIL 



another wide avenue is reached, and by widening 
Orange lane, "Washington street is reached, the 
whole at an expense not exceeding $100,000 from 
Albany street. 

Mr. Wadsworth said he would agree with the 
gentleman (rom Ward Fifteen, that if the public 
necessity required this avenue, it should be built. 
But he did not agree with him in that matter. 
Some of his arguments were fallacious and un- 
sound, in regard to the avenues across to Broad 
street. It would not be necessary to fill up all the 
space before the people of South Boston could 
avail tnemselves of tho advantages of these new 
avenues. He could not either see a fair compari- 
son in regard to Ailing up the Back Bay. In one 
case an individual contractor had done all the 
work, while in tbe other several powerful corpora- 
tions would be engaged which would have the fa- 
cilities of forwarddng the work very rapidly. 

Mr. Jenks of Ward Three said he listened with 
much interest last year to the arguments of the 
gentlemen from Ward Fitteen ; and with as much 
iuterest to his arguments of this evening. He 
considered the measure to be one of the wilde3t 
schemes which was ever entertained in any age, 
and could not conceive it to be ot any benefit to 
any human being. 

Mr. Wadsworth referred to an obstruction by a 
brick building near Orange lane, and further build- 
ings \vhich were likely to increase the damages in 
carrying out the proposed extension beyond Alba- 
ny street. 

Mr. Johnston of Ward Twelve spoke of the report 
of the majority of the Committee as being to a great 
extent made up of irrelevant matter. With refer- 
ence to the tilling up of the flats, as a party inter- 
ested, he had learned that the Governor and Coun- 
cil were opposed to moving in the matter until the 
interests of the shore owners had been conveyed 
to the State. An offer had been made to those 
shore owners which had been refused, and he be- 
lieved that all who heard him would be in their 
graves before those fiats were til'ed up. It was 
urged by him that the facilities for travel were not 
much greater for 40,000 people than they were for 
a population of 8000. In closing he quoted the 
conclusion of the minority report, as to the neces- 
sity and convenience ol the avenue, that it can be 
built at less expense now than at any future time, 
and that the plan proposed is the only one by 
which the accommodations required can be ob- 
tained. 

The question was taken on the passage of the or- 
ders, which were carried by a vote of 41 yeas to 15 
nays, as follows: 

yeas— Messrs. Batchelder, Belknap, A. F. Cole, 
M. J. Cole, Conant, Crowley, Davis, Dinsmore, Do- 
herty, Emerson, Flynn, Going, Gray, Hall, Hobbs, 
Ingalls, Jacobs, Johnston, Judson, Keany, Keith, 
Kingsbury, Leighton, Lucas, Malane, Mullane, Nel- 
son, Noyes, Osborn, Pearson, Pote, Rich, Ryan, 
Talbot, Tucker, Yannevar, Wells, Wilkins, Woods, 
Woolley, Young— 41. 

A' ays— Messrs. Bond, Bratnan, Butler, Daniels, 
Denny, Frost, Gay, Hopkins, Jenks, Poor, Rich- 
ards, Rogers, Snow, Squires, Wadsworth— 15. 

WIDENING OF BENNET AVENUE. 

Mr. Wells of Ward Three moved to take up the 
resolve and order on the widening of Bennet ave- 
nue. Carried. 

A motion to postpone the consideration of the 
subject was lost, 10 to 23, when the resolve and 
order for the widening;, were refused a second 
reading, by a vote of 5 to 23. 

On motion of Mr. Keany of Ward Two, subse- 
quently, a motion to reconsider was entertained 
under suspension of the rules, when tbe reconsid- 
eration was refused, without a count. 

ELECTION OF SECOND ASSISTANT ASSESSORS. 

The election of two Second Assistant Assessors 
was taken up, when Messrs. Ingalls of Ward 
Twelve, Going of Ward Three and Doherty of 
Waid Two were appointed a committee to receive, 
sort and count the votes. The committee reported 
as follows : 

Whole number of votes 55 

Necessary to a choice .28 

Ward Ten— Edward A. Hunting 46, Frederick G. 
Pope 8, E. W. James 1. 

Ward Twelve— Thomas Leavitt 42, Thomas Hill 
13. 

Messrs. Hunting and Leavitt were declared to be 
again elected in non-concurrence. 



PAPERS FROM T3E BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

The resolve and order for the extension of Ver- 
non street from Cabot to Tremont street was con- 
sidered. 

Mr. Wadsworth of Ward Four moved its refer- 
ence to the Committee on Streets of the Common 
Council. 

Mr. Richards of Ward Eight stated that the sub- 
ject had already been considered by that commit- 
tee. 

Mr. Wadsworth amended his motion by moving 
to lay on the table. 

Mr. Rich of Ward Fourteen hoped the motion 
would be withdrawn. 

The motion was lost. 

Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteen made a statement of 
the importance of the proposed extension through 
a short space, which would afford another direct 
avenue from Washington street to Tremont street, 
much de«ired. 

The order was read once. 

Tne order for the Committee on Petitions to the 
Legislature to appear before the Committee of the 
General Court, to protect the city's interest in re- 
gard to the extension of the Boston & Albany 
Railroad to South Boston, was passed, in concur- 
rence. 

Mr. Batchelder of Ward Four submitted an order 
for the payment of the bills of Leonard & Hartley 
and other persons directly or indirectly connected 
with the Citv Government, provided they are ap- 
proved and allowed in the usual manner. 

Passed. 

The orders of the day were laid on the table. 

PUBLIC LIBRARY BUILDING. 

The Joint Standing Committee on Public Build- 
ings, who were directed to obtain plins and esti- 
mates for the enlargement of tbe Public Library 
building on Boylston street, presented the follow- 
ing report : 

After consultation with the Trustees of the Pub- 
lic Library, and a careful examination of the prem- 
ises, your committee are of the opinion that the 
present building is entirely unsuited to the pres- 
ent and future wants ef the library. It is not only 
too small, but being situated on one of the busiest 
thoroughfares of the city, and being hemmed in 
by tali buildings, it lacks tne three essential re- 
quisites for a "library, viz.: quietness, light, and 
ventilation, and these could not be gained by any 
enlargement or alteration of tbe building. The 
enlargement of the building would necessitate the 
purchase ot additional land, and in view of the 
high price of real estate in that vicinity, your com- 
mittee are ot the opinion that the advantages 
gained would not warrant the heavy expenditure. 

The present building could be sold for a sum 
almost, if not quite sufficient, to erect a new build- 
ing on a location better adapted to the wants of 
the library, and such a location your committee 
believe could be found on the Commonwealth's 
lands. The committee transmit herewith a com- 
munication Irom the Trustees of the library, in 
which they favor the proposed change of location, 
and would recommend the passage of the follow- 
ing order : 

For the committee, 

Francis Richards, Chairman. 

Ordered, That His Honor the Mayor be author- 
ized to petition the Legislature for a grant of a lot 
of land on the Back Bay, so called, suitable for the 
location of a building to be used as a Public Li- 
brary. 

Passed in the Board of Aldermen, April 29, 1869. 

Read twice and passed in concurrence. 

Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteen offered the following 
order, which was passed. 

Ordered, That the Committee on Public Build- 
ings be authorized to fill and complete the cellar 
of the George Street Primary Schoolhouse, the 
expense to be charged to the appropriations for 
Primary Schoolbouses, Public Buildings. 

On motion of Mr. Woolley of Ward One, the un- 
finished business, relating to bathing houses, was 
taken up, and passed, as follows : 

Orders|tor the repair and maintenance of the 
Public Bathing Houses, at an expense not exceed- 
ing $12,000; and to construct and maintain a Bath- 
ing House for men and boys at the Sectional Dock, 
East Boston, at an expense not exceeding $3000 ; 
and to employ assistance for the care and manage- 
ment of the several Bathing Houses. 

Adjourned. 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



107 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 
MAY 3, 1869. 



The regular weekly meeting of tbc Board of 
Aldeiinen was held this afternoon at 4 o'clock, 
Mayor Shurtleff presiding. 

APPOINTMENTS MADE AND CONFIRMED. 

Measureisof Upper Leather— Wm.Brigdon, Geo. 
W. Bragdon, John W. Bragdon, Jr., Wni. Bowers. 

Weigher of Coal— Richard W. Kogers. 

Special Police Officers, without pay— Nathan J. 
Cottle, for duty on Boston wharf; George k,.' 
Knights, for duty at Copps Hill Burial Ground. 

JURORS DRAWN. 

Four grand and four petit jurors were drawn for 
the U. S. Court, and thirty traverse jurors were 
drawn for the Superior Court. The venire for the 
last named was of a peculiar character, as follows : 

"We command you that, without delay, you 
make known unto the Mayor, Aldermen, and City 
Clerk of said city of Boston, and thus warn them 
to assemble at the City Clerk's oifice, or at some 
other public place in said Boston there to you made 
known, and to be present at the draft and selec- 
tion of thirty men qualified to serve as jurors, of 
good moral character, of sound judgment, and tree 
from all legal objections, and inbabitants of said 
city, to serve as traverse jurors at our Superior 
Court now holden at Boston, within and tor our 
county of Suffolk, on the first Tuesday of April, 
1869, to appraise and value the fee ot a certain 
tract of land on Long Island in Boston harbor, be- 
longing to Thomas J. Dunbar and Peter Dunbar, 
as trustees, and of a tract of land on Long Island 
aforesaid, belongieg to James T. Austin and Lo- 
ling H.Austin, granted to the United States of 
America by the acts of the General Court in the 
year of our Lord, 1868. 

We also command you that, four days at least 
before the day when they are requirea to attend, 
you summon the persons so drawn and selected to 
attend at once said Couri on Monday, 17th May, 
1869, at 9 o'clock in the forenoon, in room No. 18, 
County Court House. 

Hereof fail not," &c, directed to the constable 
selected for the purpose, and signedhy the Clerk of 
the Superior Court, by direction of L. F. Brigham, 
Chief Justice of said Couit. 

Before drawing the jurors, the Mayor directed 
the committee for the selection to give an unusual 
stirring of the names in the jury box. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

Mary Sigourney's heirs, for apportionment of 
Avon place bettermeEts. 

Second Church, for apportionment of Avon place 
betterment. 

Wm. Gorman and others, that Bolton street be 
accepted, between Fard Dorchester streets. 

Wm. Whiting and others, that Warren street be 
widened and graded opposite the Haskins estate. 

Gardner Greenleaf's heirs, that Dorr street be 
laid out as a highway. 

E. W. Ourney, for apportionment of Avon place 
betterment. 

Charles Williams and others, for extension of 
Mount W arren a venue to Moreland street. 

Thos. H. Bradlee, for apportionment of better- 
ment for widening of Temple place. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Streets. 

J. L. Hunnewell, that Eutaw place be graded, 
etc. 

David Sears, Jr., and others, for sidewalks in 
Beacon street, beyond Berkeley street. 

Cushman & Brooks and others, for a restoration 
of the name of Temple place to a portion of Avon 
street, and for a hearing on the subject. 

James H. Beal and others, that Court street and 
a portion of Washington street be paved with Staf- 
ford pavement. 

James Lawrence and others, that Milk street, 
from Pearl to Congress streets, be paved with 
wood. 

Smith & Jacobs and others, that Warchain 
street may be paved. 



Burnham & Darrow, that Federal street, be- 
ween the bridge and Fourth street, be paved with 
granite blocks. 

E. C. Ayer, for permission to occupy a portion 
of street at 239 and 241 Tremont street. 

Francis E. Faxon aud others, that Coolidge ave- 
nue be paved. 

John Dupee and others, that Harrison avenue, 
between Dedharn and Plympton streets, be re- 
paved. 

severally referred to the Committee on Paving. 

Co. A, Ninth Infantry, for approval of armory at 
54 Pitts street ; and Sheridan nines, for better ar- 
mory accommodations. Severally referred to Com- 
mittee on Armories. 

John Sharland, for modification of conditions of 
sale of estate No. 629 Tremont street. Referred to 
Committee on Public Land. 

John T. Clark and others, for au alarm bed on 
Lewis Schoolhouse. Referred to Committee on 
Fire Alarms. 

J. Proctor Haskins and others, for abatement of 
a nuisance in Woodward place. Referred to Com- 
mittee on Health. 

French & Coffin and others, in behalf of Silas 
Gardner, for a fruit stand corner of Devonshire 
aud Milk streets. Referred to Committee on Li- 
censes. 

Wm. Hayden and others, that two oil lamps bo 
placed in Old Harbor place. Referred to Commit- 
tee on Lamps. 

Wesley .Ritchie and others, for a sewei in Haynes 
street- 
Charles H. Bieler and others, that the Broadway 
sewer from C to D streets be opened and cleaned. 

John Trainer and others, for a sewer in Sixth 
street from Federal to Foundry street. 

Patrick Barry, for abatement of an assessment 
for a sewer in Broadway. 

John W. May, for a sewer in St. James street, to 
connect with Shawmut avenue sewer. 

James G. Smith and others, for a sewer on War- 
ren avenue, from Berkeley +o Clarendon streets. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Sewers. 

The following petition was presented : 

May 3, 1869. 

The undersigned respectfully asks your honorable 
body that immediate measures may be taken to 
secure the straightening ot the westerly line of 
Devonshire street, between Milk street and Water 
street, so that it shall conform to the general di- 
rection of Devonshire street, from State street, 
and further, so that it shall conform to the location 
of the new Post-office and Sub-Treasury building 
as proposed upon the opposite side of the street. 
This application is made at the request ana under 
the direction of the superintending architect of 
the Tieasury Department, who takes the building 
in charge. Wm. L. Burt, 

Custodian ot the Sub-Treasury and Post-Offlce 

site. 

Alderman James moved that the petition be re- 
ferred to the Committee ou Streets, with instruc- 
tions to report an order tor the carrying out of the 
proposed widening. 

Alderman Pratt inquired what was the plan of 
detail and where the proposed widening was ap- 
plied. 

Alderman James replied that it was designed to 
straighten the line ot Devonshire street, westerly 
side, from Water to Milk streets, and relerred to 
the plan before the Board. 

Alderman Pratt said he understood that the pro- 
posed straightening from Spring lane to Milk 
street was under consideration when the plan of 
widening of the street was adopted, and it was 
thought not best to carry it out at that tune on 
account of the expense. He had been informed that 
the price of the property proposed to be taken 
had materially advanced, and it was not desirable 
to go to the great expense which the straighten- 
ing would require, when there were so many other 
places about Boston which required immediate at- 
tention. He would much rather prefer, if it was 
thought necessary to show the architectural ap- 
pearance of the new Post Office building, to cut 
off a portion from the opposite side of Milk street. 
Rather than have the matter retcrred to the Com- 
mittee, with instructions, he would have it referred 
to the whole Board, or to the Committee, to report 
upon the expediency of tlie measure. He hoped 
it would be laid on the table a week or two for fur- 
ther consideration, and moved that it be laid on 
the table. 



108 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



Alderman Richards hoped that the matter would 
be disposed of at once, for it was understood that 
not a stone could be put down for the new buill- 
ing, which would cost two or three millions of dol- 
lars, until this was settled. In coming upon Dev- 
onshire from franklin street, the angle at the cor- 
ner of Milk street is some ten or twelve leet, and 
it will be thought strange hereafter if this is not 
cut off. 

Alderman Pratt said he would personally like to 
see the improvement carried out, but he did not 
believe the citizens would think the improvement 
would justify the expense. 

Alderman Van Nostrand inquired whether tlie 
betterment would apply to the cutting off. 

Alderman Talbot replied that it might have ap- 
plied to the original widening, but not much to 
ibis. 

Alderman Baldwin said he was not quite pre- 
pared to vote on this subject, and hoped there 
would be some delay. 

Alderman Richards thought there was some mis- 
understanding on the subject. The committee 
might report on the subject, when it would be con- 
sidered, and if not satisfactory it could be voted 
down. 

Alderman Baldwin moved that the petition be 
referred to the Committee on Streets, without the 
instructions. 

The motion of Alderman Pratt was withdrawn, 
and the reference was carried. 

NOTICES OF INTENTION TO BUILD. 

C. W. Freeland, Devorshire street; J.M.Porter, 
Broadway, between Eand F streets; Wm.O'Keefe, 
corner ot Yeoman street and Yeoman place; Win. 
Morse, Tremont street, near Cabot street; M. F. 
Wells, north side of Barton street; Charles Wood- 
nerry & Son, 35 and 41 North street; N. J. Brad- 
lee, coiner of Boylston and Tremont streets; Milo 
Pierce, 115 Hanover street; Howard Clapp,Broad- 
wav, between K and L streets; Patrick Boyle, 10 
Second street; J. M. Marston, Webber street; Ed- 
ward F.Talbot, corner of Newland and Haven 
streets; George E. Shackley, 555 Seventh street ; 
T. K. Durant, Seventh street, between G and H 
streets ; Frederick Pope, Beacon street, near Fair- 
lield street; Louis Weissbein, 28 Chauncy street; 
H. B. Sargent, Washington street, corner of Wash- 
ington place; C. Tilden, Jr., Perrin street, oppo- 
site Alaska street; Wm. Evans, corner of Wash- 
ington and Lenox streets; Hugh H. Pose, Eighth 
street, near Dorchester street. Severally referred 
to the Committee on Stieets. 

QUARTERLY REPORTS. 

Report of City Clerk. The report of the City 
Clerk states that he has received for the quarter 
ending April 30, for lees, (except for dog licenses,) 
the following sums : 

Recording mortgages of personal prop- 
erty, assignments, liens, &c $470 08 

Licenses of billiard k saloons 246 09 

Licenses of intelligence offices 3 00 

Sale of old ballots 8 70 

Total $727 78 

All of which has been paid into the City Treasury. 

The report was read and sent down. 

City Registrar's Report. The City Registrar re- 
ports that during the quarter ending April 30, he 
has issued 753 certificates of intentions of mar- 
riage, and received $370 50, which sum he cas 
paid into the City Treasury. Read and s?u 
down. 

Superintendent of Faneuil Mall Market. Receipts 

for the quarter were as follows: 

Received for rent of stalls $10,396 50 

" " " cellars 5,280 00 

" " permanent outside stands. . 498 75 
" " weighing at market scales.. 3125 
" " rent of stalls in new market 3,030 00 
» " " cellars " 1,462 50 

" " lobster stand 25 00 

Cash paid to City Treasurer. . .$20,724 00 

Read and placed on file. 

Report of Overseers of Poor. The receipts for the 
quarter were as follows : 

Cash on hand, Feb, 1, 1869 4,139 89 

Drafts on City Treasurer. 18,000 00 

Cash from cities and towns 4,315 65 



State, for relief of sick paupers 3,880 05 

" •« burial of State paupers 2,790 00 

" " old accounts due Roxnury 287 27 

" " board of State paupers, at Mass. 

Infant Asylum 676 11 

$34,095 00 
The expenditures were as follows : 

Paid for burials $597 62 

" cities and towns and State for relief of 

Boston poor , . . . , 2,785 17 

" expenses of CiiyTempoiary Home.. , 3,241 33 

" pensions and grants at office 3,480 50 

" immediate relief for persons haviDg 

no settlement 131 00 

" for coal 5,01)0 00 

" " groceries ,...5,504 00 

" salary of Secretary , 500 00 

" " ' bookkeeper 375 00 

•' salaries of clerks 162 49 

" " vis.tors 900 00 

" office expenses 110 51 

" transportation of visitors 17 97 

" engineer's salary, $325; expenses, $21 

87 ; janitor's salary, $150 496 87 

$23,302 47 
City Treasurer, ca6h received from State. 6676 05 

Cash ualance ,.,..,,.,, 4116 48 

Read and sent down, 

HEARINGS ON ORDERS OF NOTICE. 

The hearings on the several orders of notice, on 
Hie proposed extension of Eighth street from D 
street to the Old Colony & Newport Railroad; on 
the proposed construction of a sewer in Ninth 
street from Lark street to E street', and on the 
proposed construction of a sewer in Eighth, be* 
tween Gates street and Old Harbor street, and in 
Old Harbor street, between Telegraph and Eighth 
street, were taken up, by assignment, No person 
appearing in relation thereto,, the reports were rt» 
committed. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

The following orders were read a second time 
and passed-; 

Ordered, That the Superintendent ot Streets be 
authoiized to reset the edgestones and repave the 
gutters and sidewalks in Bradford street; also 
gravel the roadway of said street, at an estimated 
cost of $1000, 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be 
authorized to set the edgestones, pave the gutters., 
sidewalks and crosswalks, and build the necessary 
cesspools and surface drains., also to macadamize 
the roadway ot Montgomery street, at an esti- 
mated cost of $4500, 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be 
authorized to repave Waitham street from W ash- 
ington street to Bradford street, at an estimated 
.cost of $1500. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be 
authorized to construct a bulkhead.on the easterly 
side of Albany street, from the Roxb.ury canal to 
Swett street, at an estimated cost of $384. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be 
.authorized to repave Cambridge street with small 
granite blocks, from Blossom street to North 
Grove street, at an estimated cost of $5750. 

Ordered, That the Treasurer be directed to re- 
fund to Bridget Jvayanagh the amount ot .tax as- 
sessed upon certain real estate occupied by her in 
East Boston, and also the costs and expenses con- 
nected with the collection of said tax, amounting 
to $20 50, to be charp-ed to the receipts for taxes. 

COMMON COUNCIL PAPERS. 

Petitions from the Common Council were re- 
ferred in concerrence. 

The orders to pay bills of certain members .of 
the City Government, and to repair the cellar ot 
the George Street Primary Sehoolhouse, were sev- 
erally passed in concurrence. 

ELECTION OF SECOND ASSISTANT ASSESSORS, 

The election of Second Assistant Assessors for 
Wards Ten and Twelve was taken up. 

Alderman James said he was authorized to with- 
draw the name of Thos. Hill, Ward Twelve.. 

The result was as follows: 

Whole number «f votes ,'...... 12 

Necessary to a choice 7 

Ward 10— Edward A. Hunting, 6; Frederick G. 
Pope, 0. 

Ward 12— Thomas Leavitt, 11. 



MAY 3, 1869 



109 1 



There was no choice for an Assessor for Ward 
Ten. 

Alderman Baldwin said it was possible the an- 
tecedents of Mr. Tope were not understood. Mr 
Pope was the builder of twenty-eight houses on 
Tremont street, had built, many stores on Franklin 
and Summer streets, and was now building a 
church on Columbus avenue. He was a most ex- 
cellent mechanic, was abundantly competent to 
discharge thr duties of an assessor, was the re«-u- 
!ar nominee of the Committee, and he hoped the 
Board would adhere and elect him. 

The result of the second ballot was as follows- 

Frederick G, Pope, 8; Edward A. Hunting, 4. 

Mr. Pcpe was declared elected in non-concur- 
rence, and Mr, Leavilt in concurrence. 

KEPOJiXS OF COMMITTEES. 

Aldorman Talbot* from, the Committee on 
Stieets, reported no action necessarv on sundry 
notices of intention to build. Accepted.. 

Alderman Talbot reported leave to withdraw on 
petition of E. A. Cushinir, for compensation for 
injury to a building by removal of au adjoining 
building on Avon places also leave to withdraw on 
the petitions of Erastus I?. Badger and of W. H. 
Wentworth, severally for apportionment of better- 
ments for Bowker street widening, they having 
tailed to make their applications during the time 
provided by statute. Severally accepted. 

Alderman White, from the Committee on Licen- 
ses, reported in lavor of licenses to six newsboys, 
and of sundry persons as victuallers and keepers 
of billiard saloons* Severally accepted. 

Alderman White also reported tn lavor of a 
license to Davenport Brothers for exhibitions for 
one week,, and of L. Stickney for leave to give cir- 
cus exhibitions at South Boston, May 12, and East 
Boston,. May 15. Accepted.. 

Also a report, revoking the license of William 
Purant, a minor, to Mack boots at the corner of 
Tremont and Boylston streets, and leave to with- 
draw on petition of J. p. Greene, for a periodical 
stand at the corner of Washington and Avon 
streets.. Accepted.. 

Alderman Richards, from the Committee on 
Faueu.il Hall, made a report granting the several 
applications for the use of Faneuil Hall, as fol- 
low: 

E. Alexander, Andrew Hall and others, for a 
Universalis! Festival, May 27.. 

Ancient and Honorable Artillery, for the use of 
the Hall, June 7. 

National Lancers, for the use of the Hall, June 
14 and 15.. 

Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic Association, 
for a Fair in September and October, and for leave 
to erect a bridge to connect Faneuil Hall and 
Quincy HalJ. 

The reports were severally accepted. 

Alderman Pratt, from the Committee on Lamps, 
on the petition ot C. B. Snyder, for lamps on Par- 
ker street, near Western avenue, reported that the 
same be granted ; also, favorably on petition of 
Michael Quiglcy lor lamps on Russell court, High- 
lands. Accepted. 

Alderman Pratt,. from. the same oommittee, re- 
ported leave to withdraw on petition of James S.. 
Percival and others, of F. A. Blanc and others, 
and of A. Folsom & Son and others. Severally ac- 
cepted. 

Alderman Richards,, from, the Joint Standing 
Committee on Puolic Buildings, who were direct- 
ed to make certain repairs and alterations in En- 
gine House No. 13, at an expense not exceeding 
$3000,, reported that irom estimates which they 
have received, they find tnat the cost of the pro- 
posed repairs will exceed the appropriation. They 
therefore recommend the passage ot the following 
order : 

Ordered, That the Committee on Public Build- 
ings be authorized to enlarge the hose tower, lit 
up a bathing room, paint, and make such other re- 
pairs as are necessary in Engine House No. 13, at 
an estimated cost of $4000, to be cnargedto the ap- 
propriation for Public Buildings. Head twice and 
passed. 

Alderman Richards, from the Committee on 
Public Buildings, made a report that tbe Eastern 
Avenue whart is in a dangerous and unsafe con- 
dition,. and should be immediately repaired. They 
accordingly report the following order : 

Ordered, That the Committee on Public Build- 
ings he authorized to repair Eastern Avenue whart. 



at an estimated cost of $3500, to be charged to the 
appropriation for Public Buildings. 

Read twice and passed. 

Alderman Hawes, from the Committee on Steam 
Engines, on the petition of Smith & Lovett for 
leave to use a stationary engine in the building 
> T o. 127 Albany street, and the remonstrance of 
George E. Houghton and others against the same, 
reported an order, that leave be granted to put up 
such engine upon condition that the chimney shall 
be carried up to the height of seventy-five feet 
from the sidewalk, and the exhaust pipe altered 
to the satistaction of the Committee on Steam 
Ei.gines. 

The report was accepted and the order was 
passed. 

ORDERS OF NOTICE. 

Orders of notice were reported and adopted as 
follows : 

On the notice of S. & A.. R. Whittier, that the 
Board proposes to widen Harrison avenue. Hear- 
ing Monday, May 17. 4 P. M. 

On the proposed iaying out of Clarendon street, 
between Appteton street and Columbus avenue. 
Hearing May 17, 1 P. M. 

On the proposed construction of a sewer in 
Gates street, between Dorchester and Telegraph 
streets. Hearing Monday, May 10,4 P. M. 

On the proposed assessment of betterments for 
the widening of Hanover street, a notice to all 
parties interested. Hearing Monday, May 17, 4 P. 

On the petition of John Quinn, for leave to erect 
a stable for more than four horses, on Broadway, 
between K and L streets ; and of Wilson & Buzzell 
for a stable for more than four horses on Federal 
and Alger streets. Hearing Monday, May 10, 4; P 
M. 

ORDERS PASSED, 

On motion of Alderman James, 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets, 
under the direction of the Committee on Paving, 
be authorized to build, by contract or otherwise, 
the necessary bridges and other structures for the 
extension ot Broadway from Federal street to Al- 
bany street, according to the plan adopted by the 
City CouncU and approved May 3, 1869, the ex- 
pense to oe charged to the appropriation for the 
extension of Broadway. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be 
authorized to pave the area around Joy's building,, 
on Cornhill court, with the Stafford pavement, at 
an estimated cost of $600, 

Ordered, That the Chief of Police be and he is 
hereby directed to close Devonshire street ajrainst 
public travel, from State street to Water street,, 
until the buildings on the easterly side ot said 
street shall have been removed and the widening, 
completed. 

Ordered, That the superintendent of Streets be 
directed to remove all obstructions from Dover 
street, between Harrison avenue and Albany street,, 
and from Harrison avenue, between Dover and 
Bristol streets, and to grade and pave said streets 
to the line of widening,.at an estimated cost of. 
$5000. 

On motion of Alderman White: 

Ordered, That the Committee on Licenses be au- 
thorized to have inspections of the Musical Festi- 
val building made from time to time during its 
construction, and for that purpose to appoint one 
or more engineers to act with the City Engineer in 
making such inspection. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Health bo 
and he is hereby instructed to furnish Samuel 
Stillings with 200 loads of ashes (more or les e ) on 
Appleton street, and that a charge of fifty cents 
per load be made for such ashes so delivered. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent ot Health be 
and he is hereby instructed to deliver on land of 
Boston Wharf Co. such refuse ashes and rubbish 
as may be collected, and that said company be 
charged at the rate of twenty-five cents per load 
for such ashes so delivered. 

On motion of Alderman Pratt, 

Ordered, That the Committe on Lamps be, and 
they are hereby authorized to contract with Free- 
man Uowland for the repairing of the public lamps 
in the city proper, South Boston, and the High- 
lands, for one year from May 6, 1869, for the sum of 
$3975, payable in equal monthly instalments. 

Ordered, That the Committee on Lamps be, and 
they are hereby authorized to contract with 
Messrs. J. 8. & Eli Hamblin for the repairing of 



110 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



the public lamps at East Boston, for one year from 
May 6, I860, for tbe sum of $GO0, payable in equal 
monthly instalments. 

On motion of Alderman Talbot, 

Ordered, That the assessments heretofore laid 
for the opening of Avon place, upon H. W. Sutcr 
and N. J. Bradlee, trustres, N. J. Bradlee and J. 
O. Bayley. Trustees, heirs of B. B. Appleton, Dex- 
ter N. Richards, agent, George Gardner, E. D. 
Jordan ana 0. Marsh, E. W. Gurney, heirs of alary 
Sigourney, and proprietors of Second Church, be 
apportioned into tbree equal parts. 

Ordered, That Bnylston street be widened 
by taking land of Warren Sherburne, containing 
240 square feet, at an expense of $4250. 

Ordered, That Eighth ftreet be extended 
northwesterly from 1) street, by taking land of the 
city, at no expense. 

On motion of Alderman Fairbanks, 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Sewers be 
authorized to construct a sewer in AVinthrop 
street, between ('airland and Cleveland streets, 
aud report a schedule of the expense of the same 
to this Board. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Sewers to 
authorized to construct a sewer in Sixth streat, 
between M and N streets, and in M. street, between 
Fiftn and Sixtb streets, and report a schedule of 
the expense of the same to this Board. 

On motion of Alderman White, 

Ordered, That tnere be allowed and paid to the 
commanders of the several posts of the Grand 
Army of the Republic- situated in Boston and 
numbered 7, 15, 23, 20, and 32, the sum of one hun- 
dred dollars to each, to be expended in decorating 
the graves ot Union soldiers on the 29th of May, 
1869 ; said sum to be charged to the Appropriation 
for Incidentals. 

On motion of Alderman Richards, 

Ordered, That the Committee on Fire Depart- 
ment be authorized to visit Manchester, .New 
Hampshire, and other cities, at an expense not ex- 
ceeding $500, to be charged to the appropriation for 
Fire Department. 



On motion of Alderman James: 

Ordered, That a Joint Special Committee be ap- 
pointed, consisting of two on the part of the 
Board of Aldermen, with such as the Common 
Council may join, to take such action as they 
deem proper for the entertainment of the dele- 
gates to the American Institute of Homoeopathy, 
who meet in conventton in this city on the 8th day 
of June, 1869, the expenses ot such entertainment 
not to exceed $2500. 

Aldermen James and Richards were appointed 
the committee on the part of this Board. 

On motion of Alderman James, 

Ordered, That the Chief-of-Police be directed to 
notify the owners and abutters on Sixth and 
Seventh streets, between K and L streets, 
to furnish edgestones to support sidewalks, 
and lay sidewalks with brick; also to notily 
the owners and abutters on Broadway, be- 
tween K and L streets, to furnish edgestoDes 
and lay sidewalks; also the owners and abutters 
on Eustis street, irom Orchard street to Hampden 
street, to furnish ertgestones and lay sidewalks; 
also the owners and abutters on Fifth street, be- 
tween L and M streets, to furnish new edgestones 
and lay sidewalks; also the owners and abutters 
on Pinckney street, from Charles street to the wa- 
ter, to furnish edgestones and lay sidewalks. 
On motion of Alderman Talbot, 

Ordered, That notice to quit be served upon the 
persons on the line of tbe extension of Broadway, 
tbe Old Colony & Newport Kailroad Company, the 
South Boston Iron Company, Seth Adams, Globe 
Works, Boston & Albany Railroad Company, Wm. 
S. Perry, heirs of Edward Harney, Samuel A. Way, 
Alice C. DriscoU, and Henry Town, to remove all 
obstructions to said extension of Broadway, by the 
1st August next. 

Ordered, That rotice to quit be served upon 
George Paul and George Abbott, to remove all ob- 
structions on the line of widening of Shawmut 
street, by the 1st JuDenext; also on John Bacon, 
on the line of widening of Piedmont street, by the 
1st June next. 
Adjourned. 



Ill 



COMMON COUNCIL 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of tlie Common Council, 

MAY 6, 1869. 



The regular weekly meeting of tbe Common 
Council was held this evening, at 8 o'clock, the 
President, William G. Harris, m the chair. 

PAPERS FROM T3E BOARD OF ALDEEMEN. 

The several quarterly reports of the City Clerk, 
City Registrar, and Overseers of the Poor, were 
read and ordered to be placed on file. 

The petitions of John T. Clark ard others, and 
of John Sharland, were severally referred in con- 

O Ul'l'GTlCG 

The order t3 refund to Bridget riavanagh twenty 
dollars and fifty cents, being the amount of tax 
assessed in 1863 and the cost of collectmg the 
same. being under consideration, 

Mr Snow oi Ward Eleven inquired if it had been 
in the hands of the Committee on the Assessors' 

Mr r Jray of Ward Twelve replied that it had not 
been' before that committee that h» was aware of, 
and he moved that it be leferred to the com- 

IllittGG 

The order was referred to the Committee on the 
Assessors' Department. 

The resolve and orcfer for widening of F.oylston 
street on motion of Mr. Lucas of Ward Seven was 
referred to the Committee on Streets on the part 
of the Common Council. . 

The following orders were read twice and 

P Order authorizing the repair ot Eastern Avenue 
Wharf, at an estimated cost of $3600. 

Order to enlarge hose tower, fit up bathing 
room, and repair Engine House No. 13, at an esti- 
mated cost of $1000. . 

The order for a Joint Committee to receive and 
entertain the Homoeopathic Convention about to 
be held in this city, ana appropriating $2500 there- 
lor, was taken up. „ „ . , , 

Mr Wadsworth of Ward Four said he saw no 
reason fur passing the order. The Anniversary 
Week was close upon us, and we should soon have 
here innumerable conventions. There was no 
rood reason why this should he singled out lor the 
entertainment of the city, while all others.are left 
out in the cold. It would be but awedge into the 
strong box of the City Treasmy. We were to have 
Conventions of Dentists, Oculists and Allopathic 
doctors; conventions of Clergy, quite as worthy 
and much more needy; conventions of Unitarians, 
Universalists, Calvinists, Baptists, Presbyterians, 
Methodists, Catholics and the Lord knows not 
what All oi these should be entertained or none, 
tor he could not see how this one convention should 
be singled out, while fifteen or twenty as worthy 
should be neglected. 

In addition to all these, there were to be conven- 
tions of Charitable Societies and Benevolent So- 
cieties, as numerous as were the gatherings m Pal- 
estine, when the Parthians and Medes, and Elam- 
ites and the dwellers in Mesopotamia, and other 
numerous peoples, were together. „„,„♦„ 

He therefore moved to lay the order on the ta- 

bl Mr Snow of Ward Eleven stated that in June, 
1865, 'a Convention of Allopathic Physicians were 
entertained by the city at an expense oi $6200. It 
was but fair that this convention should be enter- 
tained, and the expense would not be so great. 
The motion to lay the order on the table was 

l0 Mr. Judson of Ward Fourteen said he was much 
gratified at the remarks ot the gentleman from 
Ward Four, who had anticipated much ot what he 
was about to say. He could not see any reason 
why there should be such an expenditure; and 
thire appeared to be no end to the money which 
was pxnended for such purposes. If this expendi- 
ture should The incurred 'now, it will lead hereafter 
to the entertainment of others, and there would 
be no bounds to the throwing away ot the public 
money. He honed the Council would feel at lib- 
erty to vote against it. 



Mr. Snow of Ward Eleven said there was some 
thing in the argument of consistency of the gen- 
tleman, yet he trusted as tDe City Government had 
entertained one class of physicians, they would 
treat with hospitality another class, although he 
had no special sympathy for them. 

Mr. Wadsworth hoped they would meet with 
hospitality; he hoped that the citizens would give 
them a hearty reception, and give a hearty recep- 
tion to all others who came here, and open their 
houses to them. But he was utterly opposed to 
opening the City Treasury to one convention and 
shutting it to another. 

Mr. lngallsof Ward Twelve said he agreed to 
the general statement of the gentleman from 
Want Four, but as was said by the gentleman from 
Ward Eleven, the city having shown iis hospitali- 
ty to one convention of ohysicians, it was out just 
that similar hospitalities should be tendered in 
this case. H« was opposed to any invidious dis- 
tinctions, while he had no special regain to this 
class ot physicians. He would concur in provid- 
ing this entertainment, and when the time came 
he would vote against this class <>f appiopriations. 

Mr. Jenks of Ward Three inquired if this was a 
national convention. 

Mr. Ingalls rcDlied that he understood it was. 

Mr. Wadsworth said he could not see the dis- 
tinction which was nrnle by the gentleman from 
Ward Twelve. Because one error was made, there 
was no reason for making another, for two errors 
could not make one right. , 

Mr. Jenks repeated his question, and stated that 
if this was to be a National Convention, he would 
vote for the order. 

Mr. Ingalls said he had so stated, and he under- 
stood that distinguished persons of the profession 
trom all parts of the Unite! States would be pres- 
ent. At a proper time he was ready to stop a bad 
practice, but this was not such a time. 

M'-. Jenks expressed tbe belief that the 
entertainment should be given if it was a 
National Convention. If it had been but a btate 
Convention, he should have been opposed to it. 

On motion of Mr. Jenks, tne rules were suspend- 
ed, and the order was read a second time and 
passed. „ _ ,, ,. „. , 

Messrs. Hall of Ward One, Ingalls of Ward 
Twelve, and Wilkins of W ard Nine, were joined to 
the Committee under the order. „.,„., 

The Order to allow the Commanders of the Posts 
of the Grand Army of the Republic, numbers 7, 15, 
23, 26, and 32, one hundred dollars each, to be ex- 
pended for decorating the graves of Union soldiers, 
on the 29th May, 1869, was read twice, under sus- 
pension of tbe rules, and passed. 

SECOND ASSISTANT ASSESSOR. 

The election of one Second Assistant Assessor 
for Ward Ten, was taken up for consideration. 

Mr. Hopkins of Ward Ten moved to lay the mat- 
ter on the table. „, , _ 

At the request ot Mr. Gay of Ward Ten, the mo- 
tion was withdrawn, when Mr. Gay gave some 
reasons in favor of retaining Mr. Hunting in the 
office, and stated that as an Assessor tor two or 
three years, including last year, beheld over, on 
account of a failure to elect, and was now serving 
in that office. He renewed the motion to lay the 
subject on the table. 

Mr Keith of Ward Fifteen remarked upon the 
unfairness of the practice of moving to lay a sub- 
ject on rhe table, to cut off debate, and tbe motion 
being again withdrawn, he male some statements 
in advocacy of the election of Mr. Pope. The ques- 
tion ot a choice of candidates originally he 
thought to be of little consequence, but the Board 
of Aldermen having taken the candidate of the 
Council for Ward Twelve, it was no more than fair 
that the Council should concur with the Boara in 
the election of Mr. Pope. Whatever the qualifica- 
tions of Mr. Hunting were, those ot Mr Pope were 
fullv equal. In supr ort of these qualifications he 
read from the remarks of Alderman Baldwin. 

Mr Well« of Ward Three wished to correct the 
gentleman. George W. Pope was the person to 
whom the remarks of the Alderman referred, and 
not Frederick G. Pope, the brother who worked 
for George W. Pope, the builder and architect. 

Mr Hopkins made a similar statement in regard 
to the error fallen into by the member of the other 
Board. The antecedents of Mr. Hunting, he said, 
were as well known as were those of Mi. Pope. 
The choice of second assistant assessor had always 
been' conceded to the members of the severa 
wards for which they were elected, and he hoped 
the subject would be laid on the table. 



MAY 6, 1869 



112 



A motion to lay on the table was carried bv a 
vote of 29 to 16. J 

Mr. Butler of Ward Ten moved a reconsidera- 
tion of the vote, and he hoped it would not pre- 
vail. * 

Mr. Snow of Ward Eleven suggested that if it 
was the design to get rid of the subject, it would 
be better to take it up and move its indefinite 
postponement. 

Mr. Wads worth hoped there would he an oppor- 
tunity some time to vote on the subject. 

Mr. Oshorn of Ward Six raised a question of 
order, that the question was not debatable. 

The point of order was sustained, and the mo- 
tion to reconsider was lost— 11 to 23. 

Ihe resolve and order for the extension of Ver- 
non street, from Cabot street to Tremont street, 
was taken up, as unfinished business, and passed. 

THE MUSICAL PEACE FESTIVAL. 

On motion of Mr. Wilkins of Ward Nine, the 
order authorizing the Committee on the Musical 
1'eace Festival to tender the hospitalities of the 
city to distinguished persons invited by them to 
attend said Peace Festival, was taken from the 
table. 

Mr. Jenks of Ward Three, moved to strike from 
the order the words -'National Peace," and in sup- 
port of the motion said there was no national 
peace, and the name was but a fraud, not only 
upon the city hut the common sense of this 
body. There were ten States m the South 
which were in a worse condition than ever 
Poland was under the tyranny of Russia, 
or Ireland v as under England. The term was a 
misnomer, a wrong upon the residents of t°n 
States and upon the tax payers of this eity. If it 
was really a peace festival, he was willing 'to vote 
tor a reasonable sum of money, should it be lim- 
ited to that sum. 

Mr. Pickering of Ward Fourteen said he took it 
that the gentleman from Ward Three would not 
he opposed to "national peace" if he could get it. 
The objeet of the festival was to bring together 
people from all parts of the country, of all the 
States. They should be brought into cordial sym- 
pathy with each other ; and made so to harmonize 
as to bring about peace. The object was to make 
peace national, if it was not already so. 

The motion to strike out was lost. 

Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteen inquired if there had 
been any estimated the expense, or whether there 
was to be no limitation. 

Mr. Pickering replied that it was absolutely im- 
possible to torm an estimate of the expense which 
would be necessarily incurred. Although the invita- 
tions were restricted to as narrow a limit as possi- 
ble, it was not possible to tell how much it will 
cost or to frame an estimate. This will depend in 
some measure upon the number who will attend, 
who may be invited, and to the extent to which 
the City Council may engage in it. If the mem ■ 
hers generally take part in it, a larger appropria- 
tion will he necessary, as in the case of the enter- 
tainment of the Chinese Embassy. He thought it 
better not to specify the amount, but leave the 
Committee to keep it within moderate bounds. 

Mr. Wells of W ard Three referred to the Chinese 
reception, in which, after the first reception, the 
City Council had lit;le to do with it, the carriages 
being generally filled with outsiders. He hoped 
the committee in this case wont forget the City 
Government. 

Mr. Pickering stated that on several occasions, 
while the Chinese were here, they were under the 
control of private parties, when their movements 
were out of the power of the committee. On all 
occasions of a public nature, the City Government 
did participate in the entertainments and paid for 
it largely. 

Mr. Nelson of Ward Nine said it was understood 
the invitations would be confined to the President 
of the United States and nis Cabinet, Foreign 
Ministers. Governors of States, Mayors of the 
principal cities of the country, and Judge* of the 
Supreme Court, only a portion of whom would be 
in attendance. 

Mr. Judson of Ward Fourteen said that such an 
occasion had never occurred before. It was de- 
sirable that the people of all portions of the South 
should be induced to come here, learn better 
about us, and be convinced that we are a generous, 
hospitable, kind people. He was satisfied that no 
sum was fixed, and trusted that the order would 



receive a unanimous vote. It would be an occa- 
sion of credit to Boston, one long' to be remem- 
beied. 

Mr. Welis of Ward Three hoped that the whole 
Council would be added to the Committee. 

.Mr. Jeuks referred to the complimentary re- 
marks relative to the generosity of the people of 
Massachusetts and of Boston. He remembered 
when a regiment of soldiers who had been engaged 
in the cause of the country came home dirty and 
ragged, thai the city would do nothing for their 
comfort. He would like to see some of the liber- 
ality of Massachusetts. That liberality had never 
been exhibited except from a selfish motive. 
Massachusetts had no national reputation for 
liberaln y, and had been noted only for her assist- 
ance to the enemies of the countiy during war. 

Mr. Pickering said he did hot rise to defend 
Massschusetts, for she needed no delence, and it 
would take all night to recount the praises which 
mi cht be said of her. 

Mr. Wells moved that the whole Council be 
added to the committee. 

Mr. Keith raised the question of order, whether 
the question was germane to the subject. 

the chair ruled it to be in order, and the motion 
was lost by a vote of 8 to 23. 

Mr. Jenks moved an indefinite postponement of 
the subject. 

Mr. Keith said he found himself in a strait in 
regard to this order. He was in favor of the idea 
of a national peace festival, and the gentleman 
who originated mis matter was entitled to much 
cred't for his plans. The first steps of the Citv 
Government were in the right direction : and it 
was thought the most fitting place for the Festival 
was on the Boston Common. Some men, very 
sensitive, saw fit to consult the City Solicitor 
whether the City Government had a right to erant 
the use of the Common. The Solicitor replied 
they had, and the Board of Aldermen also thought 
so. There arose an opposition on the pretence of 
an excessive regard for the poor. These persons 
did not like to have the poor hoys deprived of 
their lights to play on tne Common. He 
undertook to say that these men wished 
to keep the Common as a soit of private park. 
They succeeded in driving the Committee from 
the Common— a place known to all persons 
throughout the country, easily accessible and 
comfortable, and where two or three hundred 
thousand of the poor" of Boston and its vicinity 
could have heard the music without charge while 
standing in the shade of the trees. Now they will 
have to go down to a spot where there will be a 
burning sand and pools of water, and where there 
can be little enjoyment. If they had succeeded 
in putting it on the Common it might have been a 
lestival worthy of the occasion ; like that great 
event two thousand years ago, when the angels 
sang of peace on earth and good will to men. 

If he could have had his way he would have for- 
borne the celebration of the Fourth of July, in or- 
der to have increased the success of the grand 
festival. 

Mr. Keith went on to speak of the circumstance 
that tne M^yor had hot been placed at th ; head of 
the committee. 

Mr. Nelson of Ward Nine stated that the Mayor 
was nominated for the Dead of that committee and 
dpclined the position. 

Mr. Keith resumed, remarking that if such was 
the fact it gave it a different appearance. Yet he 
believed that if placed on the cuinuitttee at an ear- 
lier day he could hardly have declined accepting 
the position as Mayor of the city, tie also spoke 
of the enterprise as controlled by private individ- 
uals. 

Mr. Pickering of Ward Fifteen said he wislmd to 
correct a wrong imnressi n in relation to this Com- 
mittee apd its connection wUh the Festival. The 
Festival was managed hy a committee ol citizens, 
and this committee had no control over it, and all 
that was designed by the measure was to entertain 
the distinguished persons who might he invited to 
be present. 

Mr. Ingalls of Ward Twelve did not believe in 
the Festival, but looked upon it as a humbug. In 
his view it was much like an international circus, 
or other show. Men of means had got this matter 
up as a private enterprise, and when th'' President 
ot the United States, or the Governor <>f any State, 
comes here, it will be tunc for the city to make a 
provision for their entertainment. 



113 



COMMON COUNCIL 



Mr. Wadswortb could not agree with the gentle- 
man f re m Ward Fifteen as to the location of the 
Coliseum, nor with the gentleman from Ward 
Twelve as to his love ot music, but woulo refer the 
last named to Shakspeare, who said those who 
have "no music in their souls are tit only for trea- 
son, strategem and spoils." The gentleman iroui 
Ward Three, who spoke so disparagingly of Mas- 
sachusetts, he w<uld advise to read the speech 
of Mr. WeLster to Mr. Hayue. 

Mr. Jenks said he had read both speeches, and 
thought Mr. Hayne had the best of the argument. 

Mr. Keith lurther remarked in relation to the 
building lor the Festival. 

Mr. Wells stated that pretty much all the vacant 
lots in the vitiiity of this Duikling had been taken 
up for eating houses and liquor shops. 

Mr. Flynn ot Ward Seven moved the previous 
question, wh'Ch was carried. 

The yeas and nays were ordered on the motion to 
indefinitely postpone, and the motion was lost, C 
vo 42. The yeas were — (Jonant, Crowley, Daniels, 
Jngalls, Jeuks, Kicbards. 

Mr. Jacobs of Ward Five said he wished to cor- 
rect i he statement that the Mayor had declined 
the appointment of Chairman of the Committee. 

Mr. Nelson of Waid Nine stated that he was 
present in the Board of Aldermen when it was 
pr< posed to make the Mayor the Chairman of the 
committee. This the Mayor declined, and it was 
slated that he would be invited by the committee 
to act as its Chairman. 

Mr. Flynn raised the question that debate was 
out of order under the previous question. 

The chair ruled that the previous question relat- 
ed to the question of indefinite postponement, 
and had expired with the disposal of that motion. 

Mr. Kich of Ward Fourteen expressed surprise 
at the nai,ure of the order, unlimited in extent, 
which might allow the Committees to invite all 
their relations, and their relatiors relations, to the 
ends of the earth, ana pay tneir expenses to the 
Festival. He believed there should have been 
some limit fixed, and it could be done. Should it 
prove that the appropriation is not enough, it will 
be easy lo make up the amount required, the Coun- 
cil meeting from week to week. Under the cir- 
cumstances, he moved to add a proviso at the 
end of the order, that the sum shall not exceed the 
amount of $25,000. 

Mr. Jenks of Ward l'hree moved that the order 
be recommitted to the Committee for the purpose 
of approximating something near the expense. 

Mr. Judson of vV ard Fourteen did not believe it 
possible to ascertain the amount of expense, and 
hoped all amnndinents would be rejected. 

Mr. Jacobs of Ward Five stated that the order 
was in the usual form when the amount of expense 
could not be estimated. A similar order had been 
adopted in the case of the Chinese Embassy. The 
city was morally pledged in favor of the measure. 

Mr. Ingalls inquired how the city was morally 
pledged. 

Mr. Jacobs replied that it was pledged by the 
appointment of a committee and the passage of 
orders on the subject. 

Mr. Ingalls questioned the character of the 
pledge. He had watched this thing from the first, 
and he objected to the matter from the principle 
of the thing. The appointment ot a committee iu 
the first place was for the purpose of ascertaining 
what it was necessary for the city to do. He, now- 
over, did not believe it possible to estimate the 
expense. He would give the Committee all they 
asked, holding them to a strict accountability for 
their expenditures. 

Mr. J^nks withdrew the motion to recommit, 
when the motion of Mr. Kich was lost, and the 
question was taken on the second reading of the 
order. The vote was 36 yeas, 9 nays, as follows : 

Yeas— Batchelder, Braman, A. F. Cole, M. J. 
Cole, Conant, Doherty, Flanders, Flynn, Frost, 
Gay, Gray, Hall, Hobbs, Hopkins, Jacobs, John- 
ston, Judson, Kingsbury ,L,earnard , Lucas, Mullane, 
Nelson, Noyes, Osborn, Pickering, Poor, Pote, 
Ryan, Snow, Talbot, Tucker, Vannevar, Wads- 
worth, Wilkins, Woods, Woolley. 

Nays— Butler, Crowley, Daniels, Davis, Ingalls 
Jenks, Rich, Richards, Wells. 



Under a suspension of the rules, the order was 
read a second time and passed. 

On motion of Mr. Hopkins of Ward Ten,an order 
that the Committee on Public Buildings consider 
and report what portion of the lot purchased on 
Appleton street for a primary schoolhouse should 
be added to the Rice Schoolhouse yard, and wheth- 
er any changes are required in the location of tne 
outbuildings connected with said schoolhouse, 
was referred to the Committee on Public Build- 
ings. 

On motion of Mr. Flynn of Ward Seven, an order 
directing the Committee on Ordinances to consider 
and report upon amending section twelve of the 
ordinance adopted in 1867, relative to the nomina- 
tion of assistant assessors, so as to provide that 
they shall be nominated by a committee of one 
from each ward, was referred to the Committee 
on the Assessors' Department. 

Mr. Batchelder of Ward Four offered an order 
for the appointment ot a joint special committee 
to furnish music on the Common, at Fast Boston,, 
South Boston and the Highlands, once a week dur- 
ing the summer months, the expense not to exceed 
$2500. Read once. 

On motion of Mr. Wadsworth of Ward Four the 
Water Board were authorized to report in print. 

Mi. Keith of Ward Fifteen moved to take from 
the table the non-concurrence in the Council ref- 
erence of the order for the payment of the Com- 
missioners on the proposed annexation of Dor- 
chester. Carried. 

Mr. Jacobs of Ward Five could not see the ne- 
cessity tor the reference of the matter to any com- 
mittee, and hoped the order would be passed in 
concurrence. Ordinarily these commissions were 
honorary offices, but the Koxbury Commissioners 
had bee'a paid, thus establishing the rule of the 
City Government in such matters. 

Mr. Keith agreed with Mr. Jacobs that there was 
no necessity tor the reference of the matter to the 
Committee on Claims. The Council were now 
aware of all the facts in the case. A precedent 
had been established in the payment of the Com- 
missioners on the annexation of Roxbury. The 
Chairman of the Commission was a well known 
member of the last Council, whose eminent fit- 
ness for the place would be universally acknowl- 
eged. 

Mr. Judson of Ward Fourteen said he was op- 
posed to the payment of so large an amount for so 
little service as was performed by the Commis- 
sioners. 

Mr. Jacobs said he understood that the Commis- 
sioners were engaged in the matter tor about three 
months. In reply to Mr. Batchelder ot Ward Four 
he said he supposed the chairman did do most of 
the work, but it would be impossible to discrimi- 
nate in the payment for their services. 

A motion to adjourn was lost. 

The motion to recede was carried, the Council 
refused to adjourn, and the order was passed. 

An ordinance to establish the office of Assistant 
City Clerk was taken from the table and passed. 

A petition was presented from GranviBe 1'erry, 
for removal of restrictions on land in Tremont 
street. Referred to Committee on Public Lands. 

REPORT OF A COMMITTEE. 

Mr. Woolley of Ward One, fromthe Joint Stand- 
ing Committee on Puolic Institutions, to whom 
was referred as a part of the unfinished business 
of last year, the report and plans in relation to a 
new hospital tor the insane, having carefully con- 
sidered the subject, made a report that they do 
not deem it expedient to adopt the plans for the 
erection of a building on the site heretofore selec- 
ted in Winthrop, until an effort has been made to 
select in another locality which would give more 
general satisfaction. The committee therefore 
respectfully recommend the passage of the accom- 
panying order: 

Ordered, That the Committee on Public Institu- 
tions be requested to take such steps as they deem 
necessary to ascertain whether a more eligible lo- 
cation can be obtained than the one heretofore ap- 
propriated in Winthrop, in which to erect a new 
hospital for the insane. 

The order was read once. 

Adjourned. 



114 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 

MAY 10, 1869. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Board of 
Aldermen was held this afternoon at 4 o'clock, 
Mayor Shurtleff presiding. 

APPOINTMENTS MADE AND CONFIRMED. 

Police Officer— Geoige Emerson, 2d, to be Ser- 
geant of Folice. 

Police Officers, without \jay— Eugene McCarthy, 
for duty at the Olympic Theatre during the bil- 
liard tournament; Frank Phinney, Waldo McLel- 
lau, P. G. Williams, for duty at the Boston & Al- 
bany Railroad station ; Merrill Savatre, for duty 
at the railroad crossing at Parker street. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

Willard Phillips, for an apportionment of High 
street betterment into three parts. 

E. S. Johnson, for the acceptance and grade of 
East Lenox street. 

Eliza Shea, to be paid for leasehold damages on 
account of the widening of Federal street. 

K.C.Nichols ana others, for the extension of 
Zeigler street to Washington street. 

Charles Nowell and others, for acceptance of 
portions ot St. James avenue and Boylston street 
beyond Clarendon street. 

D. G. Haskins and others, that Maywood street 
be accepted. 

Abram Prince, A. D. Hodges, Wm. A. Hill and 
others, for the widening and straightening ot St. 
James street, Boston Highlands. 

severally referred to Committee on Streets. 

Joseph Houghton and others, lor a sewer in Ca- 
bot street, from Calvert street to Washington 

Joseph Leonard and others, that the Cedar street 
sewer may be extended between Highland and 
Hawthorn streets. 

Martin Fay and others, for a sewer in Bainbridge 
street. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Sewers. 

J. H. Chadwick and others, that the unDavea 
streets of this city be watered i»t the public ex- 
pense. 

George W. Decatur, for leave to sprinkle streets 
in Ward Fourteen. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Health. 

Joseph H. Whittemore and others, that South 
street, between iineeland and Beach streets, be 
paved with granite blocks. 

Metropolitan Railroad Co., for location of track 
on Harrison avenue, beyond Dover street. 

S. C. Bixby and 59 others, that Shawmut avenue, 
between Guild row and West Roxbury, be called 
Washington street. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Paving. 

W. A. Kenrick, to be paid lor labor performed 
on draw of Dover Street Bridge in 1866. Referred 
to Committee on Claims. 

Charles L. Fraser and others, for a fire alarm 
bell on church at the corner of London and Merid- 
ian streets. Referred to Committee on Fire 
Alarms . 

NOTICES OF INTENTION TO BUILD. 

Edwin Greeley, Saratoga street, bei ween Brooks 
and Putnam streets; Asa Lewis, corner of East 
Springfield and Washington streets; Adam Am- 
rheing, 7 Parkman street ; George Hargrave, corner 
ot Brooks and Monmouth streets ; A. L. Flanders, 
corner of Emerson and L streets; B. Perry, 697 
Tremont street; John Noonan, 405 Chelsea street; 
Ivory Bean, corner of Union park, Tremont and 
Montgomery streets ; John R. Hall, Kingston and 
Bedford streets; McDonald & La»vton, 8 Mon- 
mouth street; Alden Frink, corner of Highland 
avenue and Centre street; Thomas Sullivan, 53 
Sliver street ; Ivory Bean, corner of Boylston and 
Clarendon streets; H. G. Lunt, Walnut avenue, 
between Munroe and Bowers streets; C. H. Blod- 
gett, 16 Guild row ; G. G. Elder & Son, rear of 329 
Tremont street; Standish & Woodbury, Brom- 
fleld House estate. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Streets. 



CONDITION OF THE FRANKLIN FUND. 

The following statement was received from the 
Treasurer of the Franklin Fund : 

Amount as per account, Jan. 7, 1868 $125,365 53 

Interest accrued during the year 8,127 83 

Amount of fund Jan 1, 1869 $133,493 36 

This amount is invested as follows: 
Deposited with Mass. Hospital Life In- 
surance Company 132,225 16 

Provident Institution for Savings 605 53 

Suffolk Savings Bank 606 69 

Bond of F. Hinds 56 00 

$133,493 30 

REPORT OF THE CITY REGISTRAR. 

The annual report of the City Registrar was pre- 
sented for the year 1868. 

Births— The number of births in Boston (includ- 
inc the late city of Roxbury) in 1868 was 7102. 
Males, 3590; females, 3512— an increase of 265 over 
the number of the preceding year. The increase 
in the old portion of the city was only 63, and in 
the Highlands 202, showing a gain in that section 
ot 2.14 per cent., while in the former it was but a 
little more than 1 per cent. The population of the 
city is estimated at 240,000, giving a birth-rate ot 1 
to every 33.79 persons. While thi» is lower than 
in any European nation, it is larger than in the 
last 15 or 18 years. The number of still-births not 
included in the above was 482. Ii» 1851 the birth- 
rate was one to every 26 persons living. 

In a comparison with other cities, it is shown 
that the birth rate in New York is one to 87.37 and 
in Philadelphia one to 46.35. It is however be- 
lieved there are inaccuracies in the returns of 
those cities, even under the tormidable machinery 
of the Metropolitan Board of Health of the first 
named. 

Ths births in each quarter are shown as follows : 
1st, 1659; 2d, 1667; 3d, 1864; 4th, 1912. The number 
and per centage ot the several Wards were as fol- 
lows: Ward One, 748, 10.53 per cent.; Two, 908, 
12.78 per cent. ; Three, 406, 5.72 do.; Four, 215, 3.03 
do.; Five, 489, 6.89 do. ; Six, 267, 3.76 do.; Seven, 
1100, 15.49 do. ; Eight, 283, 3.99 do. ; Nine, 310, 4.36 
do. ; Ten, 403, 5.67 do. ; Eleven, 276, 3.88 do. ; Twelve, 
551, 7.76 do. : Thirteen, 318, 4.48 do. ; Fourteen, 275, 
3.87 do. ; Fifteen, 553, 7.79 do. There was an in- 
crease of 263 births in Wards 1, 4, 7, 8, 10 and 12, 
and a decrease of 200 in the remaining six Wards 
of Boston, compared with the preceding year. 
The greatest increase was in Wards 1 and 12, this 
number being 75 and 70. 

The number of children whose parents were 
both born in the United States, including half of 
those who were recorded as unknown, is 1818— 
25.95 per cent.; in 1867 the per centage of the 
whole number was 24.11. Those whose parents 
were both foreiem born, including half of those 
recorded as unknown, number 4233—54.60 ner 
cent. ; in 1867 the per cent, was 01 37. Tne number 
of children whose fathers were foreign born is 
4766 — 67.10 per cent, of the whole number ot chil- 
dren born. The number in which one or both pa- 
rents were foreign born is 5224—73.55 per cent. 
The number of native born fathers is 2301—32.41 
per cent. Native born mothers, 2391—33.69 per 
cent. The number of children of unmixed Irish 
parentage is 2768—38.97 per cent., or 2% per cent. 
less than the preceding year. There were 83 col- 
ored births, 36 males, 47 females— and there were 
53 marriages and 90 deaths of this class. There 
was one child ot Indian parents. There was one 
case of triplets, both American parents, and 02 
twin births— 16 of American parents, and 29 in 
which both parents were Irish. 

Marriages. There were 3138 marriages in Boston 
in 1868, including those that occurred in the High- 
land district. There were 2897 marriages in Boston 
in 1867, and 259 in Roxbury, which shows a de- 
crease of 18 in the aggregate number of both places 
in 1868. The number of marriages are in the ratio 
of 1 to every 76.48 of an estimated population of 
240,000. The ratio in the whole State is 1 to every 
43.82, which contrasts unfavorably for Boston. 
The official report of New York gives the mar- 
riages there as in the ratio of 1 to 158.82 ; that ot 
Philadelphia, 1 to 125.56. These figures, of course, 
are very far from being correct, and only serve to 
show the faulty method of returns in operation in 
those places. 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



115 



The number and percentage of the inarirages in 
each quarter were as follows: 1st quarter, 734 23 39 
per cent. ; 2d quarter, 773, 24.63 per cent. ; 3d Quar- 
ter 710.22.62 do,; 4th quarter, 921, 29.35 do q 

lhere were fewer marriages in March, as usual 
than in any other monih, the number bein<* onlv 
1,1 - i Ue S e . x £ lowest num ber was in August? when 
217 entered into the marriage relation. The hisrn- 
est number was in November, when it reached to 

OO'K 

The number of certificates issued during the 
year was 3578-440 more than the number of mar- 
riages recorded. Some of these certificates have 
been used out of the State, some in other 
towns in the State, and some been un- 
doubtedly used in the city but have not 
been returned by the officiating clergvmen. A 
lew of these last will, perhaps, after the lapse of a 
longer or shorter period, be sent to this office to be 
recorded, but too late to he entered on the dupli- 
cate returns made to the Secretary ot State. These 
last delinquents can haidlv be ignorant of the re- 
quirements of the law ; yet they show this most 
supreme disregard of them, and an utter oblivious- 
ness of what may have to be of vital interest of the 
parties marriea by thein. 

The number of native-born grooms was 1554, 49.55 
per cent of the whole number, the same as the 
preceding year. The Irish element made 28.80 per 
cent. The German population was represented 
by 10o marriages. The number of native-born 
brides was 1588, or 50.60 percent; ot Irish, 968, 30.84 
per cent. The Irish grooms exceeded tbnse of 
native born to Massachusetts. There were 56 males 
under 21 years ot age, three of 17 years. Of the 
brides, 64 were under 18 years ; 14 of 16 years. The 
m^moer of colored couples was 53,18 less than in 
1867, There were two couples of deaf mutes mar- 
ried . 

Deaths. The number of deaths in Boston (in- 
cluding the Highlaud District) during the year 
1868 was 5519-males 2861; females, 2658 The 
number of deaths in Boston in 1867 was 4421 • in 
Roxbury 605, showiDg an increase of 493 compared 
Wl „r Preceding year. The increase in Boston 
was 388; in Roxbury 105; an increase in the for- 
mer place of 8.77 per cent.; in the latter 17.35 per 
cent. ihe proportion of the deaths in the two 
of^o'oo 0116 t0 43 ' 48 ° f the estimated Population 
The following statement of the deaths in 
Boston, New York and Philadelphia will show 
the mortality in the first named place com- 
pared with that of the last two. The reports of the 
deaths in New York and Philadelphia are not 
liable to the same objections that exist against the 
returns of births and marriages. As every inter- 
ment requires a permit for removal, the mortality 
in each place is undoubtedly correctly stated • 

In Boston, 1 death to 43.48 ; New York, 1 to 44.19 ; 
Philadelphia, 1 to 59.74. 

New York has long borne the unenviable repu- 
tation of being little less than a plague spot. Those 
who have been accustomed so to regard it, will be 
somewhat surprised to learn that notwithstanding 
its tilth, and the free-and-easy way in which public 
matters are conducted, its bill of mortality has a 
more agreeable appearance than that of Boston, 
while Philadelphia outstrips both in an extra- 
ordinary degree. 

The number and percentage of deaths in each 
quarter was as follows . 1st, 1341, or 24.30 per cent. ; 
ik ¥£; 21-fO per cent.; 3d, 1736, 31.45 per cent. 
4th, 1239, 22.45 per cent. Of the whole number of 
deaths, 1589, or 28.79 per cent., were foreign born, 
and there was an increase of 5 per cent, of those 
born in Ireland. Of the deaths, but nW were of 
native parentage, or 30.80 per cent.— a decrease 
ltom the preceding year. Those ot Irish paientage 
make 48.79 per cent., and 70 51 of all ot foreign pa- 
rentage. Tables given show that while 67.59 per 
cent, of the children have foreign-born fathers, 
6J.19 per cent, of the mortality is among those of 
the same parentage. Of the 32.41 per cent, of the 
children who had native fathers, only 30.80 per 
ce ^, t - of,he death? occur among that class. 

ihe deaths under one year show 25.40 per cent, 
of the whole number. In Philadelphia the per 
centage was 28.80; in this State, exclusive of Bos- 
ton, the per centage was 20. In the preceding 
o?n!I pel centage uuaer one year in Boston was 
*\ - 9 J- . There were 774 deaths under six months, 
oij> being of ioreign parentage. Of the remaining 
oM, under one year, 399 were of foreign pf reatage. 
ihe number of deaths between one and l.ve years, 



was 1061 ; five and ten, 269 ; ten and fifteen, 96 ; t wentv 
and thirty, 547; thirty and forty, 491; 'forty and 
^'ci 22 ' *j fty a » d .sixty, 338, sixty and seventy, 
™»U? Ve ? ty aDd - mnety ' 388-131 males, 233 fe- 

Si. ?1 P d »? V in9 ninety ' 15 males ' 9 females. One 
man died at 102; one woman at 109 years. Deaths 
ot colored persons, 90-a decrease ol 18 from 1867 

rne number of interments in the city was 326 • 
city proper, 109; South Boston, 112; East Bos on,' 
™h £ h i er S WCre 120 disinterments and removals 
and 52 bodies were brought here from other places 
and deposited in tombs and cemeteries in the city! 

Ot the deaths, there were from accidents 192- 

r?n£Wi b , lain diSeaSes ' 268 ; bronehito,160; 
cancer, 85; cholera, 2; cholera infantum, 488; con! 

U^rnZl ^ri 20 m t ,es ' m lemales 5 convulsion^, 
142 , croup, 127 ; diarrhoea and dysentery, 214 ; dipbl 
them, 67; typnoid fever, 120; heart disease, 172; 
hydrocephalus. 129; intemperance, 32; lung di S ! 
eases, 86; marasmus, 111; measles, 68; old age, 
ftfti, p 2? aiysis > 85; pneumonia. 358; premature 
c't!?'. 83; Puerperal disease, 66; scarlatina, 266; 
suicide, 18: small pox, 8; unknown diseases' 112 

n£? Jf ?S ^I 3 ^ 1 per cent - of the mortality oc- 
curred m Ward Two, and 12.93 per cent, in Ward 
Seven. The deaths in Wards One, Two, Seven and 
dJ a e f V a e i m w e 42 ' 6 V per cent - of a11 tbe ^aths; the 
#w£L m W S^ Four ' Six > Ei S ht ' Ten - Eleven, 
Ihnteen and Fourteen make only 26.49 of the 
whole. The deaths in the hospitals were 6.90 per 
cent, of the whole number, less than the preceding 

' S^me remarks were made in relation to the ne- 
glect of clergymen and physicians in making re- 
turns of births, marriages and deaths, and the 
marriage law is appended for the information of 
clergymen and others. 
The report was ordered to be printed. 

HEARINGS ON ORDERS OF NOTICE. 

The hearings on the several orders of notice on 
the proposed extension of the Gates street sewer, 
and the laying out and acceptance of Ward street 
between Dorchester and Preble streets, were tak- 
en up No person appearing in either case, the 
reports were recommitted. 

the hearing on the petition of J«hn Quinn, for 
leave to erect a stable on Broadway, between K 
and L streets, for more than four horses, was tak- 
en up, when a remonstrance was presented from 
Solomon S. Gray and others against the same. The 
report was recommitted. 

The order of notice on petition of Joseph Oool- 
iage tor leave to place a steam engine and boiler 
in his building at the corner of Charles and Cam- 
bridge streets, was taken up, by assignment. 

Remonstrances were presented from the mana- 
gers of the Eye and Ear Infirmary, E. H. Derbv 
and others and Otis Clapp and others, which were 

JT6B.C1. 

_ Mr. Derby, on reading his remonstrance, ob- 
jected to a re-hearing of the Petition lor the rea- 
son that the case had recently been adjudicated on 
its merits, and it would be unjust to require the 
parties to go into another hearing on the same 
state ot tacts. The statements of the petitioner as 
contained in the petition he contended were not 
warranted by the facts in the case. 

T. Iv. Lottirop, in behalf of the Eye and Ear In- 
firmary, remarked upon the objectionable charac- 
ter of having a steam engine in the immediate vi- 
cinity of that institution, In its effect upon the pa- 
tients. He objected also for the same reasons given 
by Mr. Derby, to a second hearing, when there had 
been no chanee in the condition or circumstances 
ot the case. It was true, he admitted, that there 
was once a small engine on the premises, but this 
was when there was no ordinance against the erec- 
tion ol such engines, and no control could be had 
over them. 

Linus Child, for the petitioner, said he took is- 
sue with Mr. Derby in relation to the statements 
which he had made. Mr. Coolidge, lor whom he 
appeared, was not a party to the former applica- 
tion, winch was made by the tenants of the build- 
ing. On the hearing in that case, the tenants hav- 
ing no interest in the estate were asked if they 
were willing to agree to certain restrictions, and 
having no authority to agree to them, the commit- 
tee reported against this application. Mr. Coolfdrre 
now appears as the owner of the building, and on 
his assurance he was satisfied it could Be shown 
that the tacts were not as stated by Mr. Derby 11 
an opportunity was afforded, either before the 



116 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN, 



Board or before tlie committee, lie was sure tnat 
he could convince them of the correctness of 
the statements of the petitioner. 

Mr. Derby replied that the case was fully pre- 
sented at the former hearing before the Commit- 
tee, and every opportunity was given to present 
all the facts connected with it. Sot only the par- 
ties applying at that time, but the owner, was rep- 
resented at the hearing. 

On motion of Alderuian Hawes, the report and 
remonstrances were recommitted to the commit- 
tee. 

A notice was received from the Metropolitan 
Uailroad Company accenting the location on 
Berkeley street. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

The order for the purchase of land on East 
street, and lor the erection thereon of a house for 
Engine No. 7, and tor a Hose Carriage ; and to pro- 
vide a loan of $30,000 for that purpose, was con- 
sidered. 

Alderman Richards, in explanation, stated that 
Engine No. 7 was now located in Purchase street, 
the building being old und unsuited to the pur- 
pose. The city now owns a lot of land on East 
street, and a lot adjoining can be purchased which 
will make a much more suitable location. The lot 
on Purchase street can be sold at a higher price 
for business purposes, and is worth considerably 
more, than the lot it is proposed to occupy. The 
proposed change of location has the approval of 
the Chief Engineer of the Fire Department. 

The order was read a second time and passed. 

COMMON COUNCIL PAPEES. 

The petition of Gr. Perry for removal of restric- 
tions on land in Tremont street was refered to the 
Committee on Streets, in concurrence. 

The order to refund certain taxes to Bridget 
Kavanagh was referred to Joint Committee on As- 
sessors' Department, in concurrence. 

The order lor Cochituate Water Board to report 
in print was adopted, in concurrence. 

The order suggesting a change in the mode of 
nominating Assistant Assessors was referred to 
Committee on Ordinances, in concurrence. 

Tbe order of inquiry as to the amount of land 
on Appleton street which will require to be aaded 
to Uice Schoolhouse yard, &c, coming up, for ref- 
erence to Committee on Public Buildings, 

Alderman Talbot inquired why it was necessary 
to enlarge the schoolhouse yard of the Rice School 
before the house was finished, when it was for- 
merly said the lot was ample, and he wished to 
know whether this order came from the Commit- 
tee on Public Buildings. 

Alderman Richards said he knew nothing of the 
matter; a lot of land had been purchased adjoin- 
ing for a primary school, and it appeared that 
some one had put in an order for an inquiry 
whether any portion of it could be added to the 
Rice Schoolhouse yard to better advantage than to 
remain as a part of the premises of the primary 
school. 

Alderman Talbot said it would appear that the 
addition of the land would necessitate the loss of 
all the labor on the yard of the Uice School. 

Alderman Richards repeated that the project 
was new to him, but the Committee on Public 
Buildings would not take any action unless war- 
ranted. 

The Board then concurred in the reference. 

The ordinance to provide for appointment of an 
Assistant City Clerk was passed in concurrence. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Alderman "White, from the Committee on Li- 
censes, reported in favor of licenses to two news 
boys, and one boy to sell shoe lacings. Accepted. 

Alderman White also reported licenses to sun- 
dry persons as victuallers and keepers of billiard 
saloons ; also a license to E. C. Moore for Stone & 
Murray's Circus, and to Timothy Hussey to give 
an entertainment at 119 Haverhill street. Sev- 
erally accepted. 

The same committee made a report revoking the 
license of Charles M. Harriman,'to keep an intelli- 
gence office at 89 Court street. Accepted. 

Alderman James, from the Committee on Pav- 
ing, reported that leave be granted to Harriet M. 
Miles to cut down a tree in front of No. 34 Forest 
street; and to J. Watson Taylor to cut down a tree 
at No. 27 Forest street. Severally accepted. 



Alderman James reported no action necessary 
on the petition of Geo. S. Hillard and others, for 
the paving of Avon street, near Tremont street, 
with Nicolson pavement ; and leave to withdraw, 
severally, on petitions of Jeremiah Donovai , for 
leave to construct a cellar doorway at No. 170 Sixth 
street; on petition of J. L. Hunnewell, for the 
grading of Eutaw place, the same not being a 
public way; of Francis E. Faxon, for the paving 
of Coolidge avenue, for the same reason. Sever- 
ally accepted. 

The same committee reported no further action 
necessary on the petitions for the repair of Brad- 
ford street, the Board having acted upon the mat- 
ter. 

Alderman Richards, from the Committee on the 
Fire Department, reported leave to withdraw on 
the petition of Wm. /I. Hill, against the erection 
of wooden buildings No. 5 North Bussell street, 
the Committee having visited the premises, and 
were of the unanimous opinion thai they were con- 
structed within the limits of the law. Accepted, 

Alderman Seaver, from the Committee on the 
Market, reported in favor ot the transfer of lease 
of stalls Nos. 65, 67 Faneuil Hall Market. Accept- 
ed. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on Streets 
reported no action necessary on sundry notices of 
intentions to build. Severally accepted. 

Alderman Talbot also reported leave to withdraw 
on petition of Nathan Matthews, for a discontinu- 
ance of streets south of Providence and Boston & 
Albany Railroads; of M. T. Durrell and others for 
revising of High street betterments; and of Geo. 
F. Parkman and others for the opening of Fruit 
street west of Charles street, or its discontinu- 
ance; and no further action necessary on the re- 
committed order in relation to the widening of 
West street. Severally accepted. 

Alderman Talbot also reported leave to with- 
draw on the petition of William L. Burt, Postmas- 
ter, for a further widening of Devonshire street. 

Alderman Richards opposed the acceptance of 
the report, believing that the petition ought to be 
granted. The impfovemements contemplated in 
the streets about the Post Office will make them 
the most important business streets in the city. 
The Government had offered to give foot for foot 
in the widening of Devonshire street from Water 
to Milk street, and it ought not to be objected to 
cutting off the corner which made so irregular a 
line. He did not knew how much the cost of the 
proposed widening would be, yet he was sure that 
the building necessary to be cut off would require 
renovation to fit it for the class of business for 
which it would be occupied. With such renova- 
tion as would be required, it would rent for three 
times as much as it does now. It would not be 
difficult in the renovation to straighten the liDe. 
If it were owned by any other person in the city 
than its present one, it would be sure to be done. 

Alderman James was of the opinion that the 
widening should be accomplished. For the pur- 
pose of giving further time for the consideration 
of the subject, he moved to lay the report on the 
table for one week. Carried. 

Alderman James, from the Committee on Public 
Lands, reported leave to withdraw on petition of 
John Sharland, for modification of the conditions 
of the sale of a lot of land 629 Tremont street. 
Accepted. 

Alderman Fairbanks, from the Committee on 
Sewers, reported leave to withdraw on petition of 
John Trainer and others, for the construction of a 
sewer in Sixth street, from Federal street to Foun- 
dry street. Accepted. 

Alderman James, from the Committee on Pav- 
ing, on the petition of Cushman & Brooks and 
others, for a restoration of the name of Temple 
place and for a hearing in support of the same, 
made a report, that during the last few years they 
have given to many of these petitioners several 
hearings on this subject, and being of the opinion 
that no new arguments can be presented of suffi- 
cient importance to effect the judgment of this 
Board, they respectfully recommend that the peti- 
tioners have leave to withdraw. Read and accept- 
ed. 

Alderman James, from the Committee on Pav- 
ing, to whom was referred the petition of James 
H. Wilder and others, that the name ot Cow 
street, between Sudbury street and Bovvooin 
square, be changed to Cambridge street, and the 
remonstrance of Job A. Turner and others against 
the proposed change, made a report that it is in- 



MAY 10, 1869 



117 



expedient at the present time to change the name 
of said street. Head and accepted. 

Alderman James, from the Committee on Public 
Lands, to whom was referred the petition of John 
Mack, that the time lor building; upon lot num- 
bered 3, East Concord street, may be extended one 
year from May 1, 1SC9, made a report, recommend- 
ing the i.assage of the following order: 

Ordered, That the time for building upon lot 
numbered 3, East Concord street, be extended to 
May 1, 1870, upon condition that there is paid to 
the Superintendent of Public Lands the sum of 
$100 within two days from ohe passage of this or- 
der. 

The report was accepted and the order was 
passed. 

Alderman James, from the same Committee, on 
the petition of Solomon S. Gray, reported the fol- 
lowing order, which was passed : 

Ordered, That his Honor tue Mayor be and he is 
hereby authorized to execute an instrument made 
satisfactory to the City Solicitor, removing the 
condition for time of building upon two lots of 
land on Broadway and M streets, as purchased of 
the city by Solomon S. Grnv, upon his paying to 
the Superintendent of Public Lands the sum 
of $500, within two days from the passage of this 
order. 

ROXBURY LATIN SCHOOL. 

Alderman White, from the Joint Standing Com- 
mittee on Public Instructicn, to whom was refer- 
red the petition of the trustees of the Box bury 
Latin School, for an appropriation from the city 
treasury in aid of said school, made a report as 
follows : 

The school was established in 1645, under the 
name of the "Free School in Koxbury," and is sup- 
ported by the income of a fund derived chiefly 
from the lease ot lands bequeathed to it in 1671 by 
Thomas Bell of London. A complete statement of 
the invested fund is given in a communication 
from the Treasurer, appended hereto. 

For several years past, owing to the rapid 
growth of the school, the income lias been insuf- 
ficient to meet the expenses, and an annual ap- 
propriation was made by the City Council of Box- 
bury to cover the deficit. The appropriation of 
$3000 now asked for by the trustees is mainly for 
extraordinary expenses. 

The present salaries of three teachers amount to 
$5500 ; the other annual expenses amount to about 
$700; and the income falls short of this about $1200. 
The appropriation asked for is to cover the defi- 
ciency, make repairs on the schoolhouse, furnish 
books of reference and apparatus, and increase 
the salaries in order to retain valuable teachers. 

At the expiration of some of the present leases, 
the income will be sufficient to make the school 
entirely self-sustaining. It is free to pupils from 
any section of the city ; and in the words of the 
Trustees, "while it relieves the Boston Latin 
School, already crowded, it saves the city an- 
nually not less than $5000 or $6000, by educating 
between sixty and seventy-five boys." " 

In order to remove any legal objections to an 
appropriation by the city, in aid ot a school not 
controlled by the School Committee, the Legisla- 
ture has recently passed an act a copy of which is 
appended, authorizing the city to appropriate, 
from time to time, siich sums of money for its 
maintenance, not exceeding $3000 in any single 
year, as they may deem expedient. 

The committee have made a personal examina- 
tion of the school and are satisfied that any appro- 
priation made from the City Treasury would be 
judiciously expended by the trustees, and that the 
maintenance of the school at its present high stand- 
ard should be insured by the aid and encourage- 
ment of the City Government. 

They therefore recommend the passage of the 
following order: 

Ordered, That there be allowed and paid to the 
Trustees of the Boxbury Latin School the sum of 
$3000, to be expended in such manner as they shall 
deem expedient, tor the maintenance of said 
school ; provided that said Trustees shall make 
the annual report mentioned in the act of the 
Legislature concerning said school, approved 
April 13, 1869, said sum "to be transferred lor that 
purpose from the Beserved Fund. 

Alderman White asked lor the reading ot the 
order a second time. 

Alderman Talbot objected to further action at 
this time. He had heard that the value of the 



property, which would accrue, for the support of 
this school, when the leases expired, would ulti- 
mately amount to $1,000,000, and he doubted the 
policy of the appropriation of money for a school 
not under the control of the city. He wished time 
to consider the matter. 

Alderman Wnite stated that the school was a 
great benefit to Boston, pupils from all sections of 
the city having a right to attend it, (the number of 
pupils now being 00,) and it saved a large expendi- 
ture which would be necessary should the pupils 
of that section of the city be required to attend 
the Latin school in this city. 

Alderman Talbot said the question was whether 
any appropriation should be made by the city to 
outside schools. Should aid be afforded in this 
case, somebody else will make a call next week, 
and there will be no telling where it will end. 

Alderman White withdrew his motion for a sec- 
ond reading. 

ORDERS OF NOTICE. 

On the proposed construction of a sewer in Ward 
street. Hearing Monday next, 4 P. M. 

On the proposed rebuilding of a sewer in War- 
ren avenue, between Berkeley and Clarendon 
streets. Healing Monday next, 4 P. M. 

ORDERS PASSED. 

On motion of Alderman James, 

Ordered, That the Board establish the grade of 
Berkeley street, as shown on a plan and profile 
made by the City Surveyor, dated May 6, 1869, ap- 
proved by the Committee on Paving and deposited 
in the office of the City Surveyor. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be 
directed to cause all obstructions to be removed 
from Dartmouth street, between Columbus avenue 
and the bridge over the railroad tracks. 

Ordered, That the Board establish the revised 
grade of fcagle street, between Putnam and Chel- 
sea streets, as shown on a plan and profile of said 
Eagle street, made by the City Surveyor, dated 
May 6. 1869, approved by the Committee on Paving 
and deposited in the office of the City Surveyor. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be 
authorized to set the edgestones, pave the gutters, 
and gravel the roadway of Pinckney street, west 
of Charles street; also to build up the seawall 
and erect an iron fence at the foot of the street, at 
an expense of $500. 

Ordered, That the City Treasurer be and he is 
hereby directed to abate the sum of $5 70 from the 
bill of VVm. E. Hicks for edgestones on Shawmut 
avenue; also $22 40 from the bill of Howard S. 
Williams for sidewalks oti Zeigler street, tbe same 
having been assessed in error. 

Ordered, That the Chief of Police be directed to 
notify the owner of estate No. 10 Eaton street to 
re-cover the coal-hole in front of his premises, in 
default of which the Superintendent of Streets is 
directed to close up the same at the expense of 
the owner. 

Ordered, That authority be given to the Commit- 
tee on Public Lands to sell the lands belonging to 
the city on Harrison avenue, Albany, Dover and 
Bristol streets, upon such terms and conditions as 
in their judgment they shall deem for the best in- 
terests of the city. 

On motion of Alderman Talbot, 

Ordered, Tuat there be paid to the heirs of Sam- 
uel Jepson $7000, and James Bichardson, lessee, 
$500, for land taken and damages occasioned by 
the widening of Tremont street, under resolves ap- 
proved June 6 and August 14, 1868, to be charged 
to the Tremont street loan. 

Ordered, That there be paid to Wm. W. Tucker 
and others, trustees under the will of Wm. Law- 
rence $15,120 for land taken and damages occa- 
sioned by the widening of Devonshire street, un- 
der resolve of April 11, 1868, to be charged to the 
Devonshire street loan 

Ordered, That there be paid to Wm. H. Hong- 
will and James McMahon the sum of $6035 60 for 
land taken and damages occasioned by the exten- 
sion of Vernon street, under resolve of May 7, 1869, 
to be charged to the appropriation for laying out 
and widening streets. 

Ordered, That there be paid to Samuel A. Way 
$15,022 for land taken and damages occasioned by 
the extension of Broadway, under resolve of May 
3, 1869, to be charged to the appropriation for the 
extension of Broadway. 

Ordered, That the order passed February 8, 1869, 
apportioning the betterment of $396 50 assessed 
upon the estate of Charles G. Putnam on the heirs 



118 



BOAED OF ALDERMEN 



of F. W. P. Greenwood, No. 6 Temple place, into 
three equal parts, be and the same is hereby re- 
scinded, the said Pntnam having since elected to 
pay the said betterment. 

Ordered, That the betterments heretofore as- 
sessed upon Frederick H. Bradlee for the widen- 
ing ot Temple place be apportioned into three 
parts, as per schedule. 
On motion of Alderman Richards, 
Ordered, That the Committee on the Fire De- 
partment be and they are hereby authorized to 
contract with the Amoskeag Manufacturing Com- 
pany for a second-class steam fire engine and hose 
carriage, at an expense not exceeding $5000, the 
same to be charged to the appropriation for Fire 
Department. 

Ordered, That the Chief Engineer of the Fire 
Department be and he is hereby authorized to 
purchase, under the direction of the Committee 
on Fire Department, one pair ot horses, tor Hook 
and Ladder Companj No. 4, for a sum not exceed- 
ing $850, the same to be charged to the appropria- 
tion for the Fire Department." 
On motion of Alderman Fairbanks, 
Ordered, That the sum oi $32 30 be abated as an 
assessment for a sewer on Wareham street, on J. 
W. Coburn, and that the same be assessed on True 
Brown. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Sewers be 
authorized to construct a sewer in Eighth and Old 
Harbor streets, and report a schedule of the ex- 
pense ot the same to this Board. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be 
authorized to construct a sewer in Ninth street, 
between Lark and E street, and report a schedule 
of the expense to this Board. 
On motion of Aldermau White, 
Ordered, That the City Treasurer be and he is 
hereby instructed, until otherwise ordered, to pay 
to discharged employes, iu anticipation ot the 
monthly pay rolls, such amounts as may be due 
them from the city for services rendered to date 
of discharge, upon orders from the superintend- 
ents of the several departments under which they 
were employed. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Health be 
and he is hereby instructed to deliver on Boston 
Common one hundred loads of ashes, more or less, 
the same to be charged to Roger Drury, at fifty 
cents per load for such ashes so delivered. 
On motion of Alderman Pratt, 
Ordered, That from and after the 1st January, 
1869, until otherwise ordered, there be allowed and 
paid to the District Attorney tor the county of Suf- 



folk the sum of $400 per annum, for rent of office, 
said sum to be charged to the appropriation for 
county of Suffolk. 
On motion of Alderman Seaver, 
Ordered, That the Committee on Bridges be au- 
thorized to expend a sum not exceeding $500 for 
repairing the piers of the Meridian street bridge, 
the said sum to be charged to the appropriation 
for bridges. 

On motion of Alderman James, 

Orders were adopted directing the Chief ot Po- 
lice to notiiy the owners and abutters on Decatur 
street, between Border and Bremen streets, to fur- 
nish edgestones for sidewalks and to lay sidewalks 
with brick; also, to notify owners and abutters on 
Havre street, between Maverick and Meridian 
streets, to furnish new edgestones and lay side- 
walks with brick ; also, to notify the owners and 
abutters on Chelsea street, between Porter and 
Prescott streets, the owners and abutters on Com- 
monwealth avenue, between Berkeley and Clar- 
endon streets, and on Beacon street, between 
Dartmouth street and the Brookline line, to fur- 
nish edgestones and lay sidewalks with bricK ; 
also, to notify the owners and abutters on London 
street, between Maverick and Decatur streets, to 
furnish new edgestones and to lay sidewalks with 
brick. 

Ordered, That the annual report of theAuditor be 
made iu print, and that 4000 copies of the same be 
printed, 3000 to remain in the Auditor's office, and 
1000 copies to be placed in the various police sta- 
tions for distribution, and that public advertise- 
ments be given in the newspapers that copies may 
be had at the station-houses, and Auditor's office, 
City Hall. 

On motion of Alderman White, an order was 
passed for the abatement of nuisances in Napier 
Street place, Grape place, and in Washington 
square. 

An order was offered that the Committee on 
Ordinances be directed to provide for the employ- 
ment of an errand boy at the office of the City 
Solicitor, at such a compensation as may be rea- 
sonable, to be charged to the appropriation for 
salaries. 

Alderman Richards suggested that much of 
the duties for an errand ooy grew out of mat- 
ters relating to the Church Street District, 
perhaps an arrangement might be made that 
would save the necessity of employing such a mes- 
sunger. 

On motion of Alderman Richards the order was 
laid on the table. 

Adjourned. 



119 



COMMON COUNCIL 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 

MAY 13 186 ( J. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Common 
Council was held this evening at 8 o'clock, Wm. 
G. Harris, rue President, in the chair. 

PAPERS FROM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN 

The petitions of W. A. Kenrick to be paid :'or la- 
bor performed on the draw of Dover street bridge, 
and of Charles L. Frazer and others for a lire alarm 
bell on the church at the corner of Loudoj and 
Meridian streets, were referred in concurrence. 

The report leave to withdraw on the petition of 
J. Sharland for modifications of conditions of sale 
of estale 629 Tremont street, was accepted, in con- 
currence. 

The report and order authorizing release of con- 
ditions for time of building on two lots of land on 
Broadway and M streets, bought ot the city by S. 
.S. Gray, upon his paying five hundred dollars with- 
in thirty days from the passage of the order, were 
tak&nup, and the order was passed in concur- 
rence. 

Che report and order authorizing extension of 
time for Duilding on lot Wo. 3 East Concord street, 
to JUay 1, 1870, on the payment of one hundred dol- 
lars within ten clays from the passage ot the order, 
were considered, and the order was passed in con- 
currence. 

The following orders were severally passed, in 
concurrence: 

Order to pay discharged employes, in anticipation 
of imuthly pa.y-rolls, such amounts as may be due 
them by the city to date of discharge. 

Order that the annual report ot the auditor of 
Accounts be submitted in print, and that 4000 
copies be printed; 3000 retained at the City Hall, 
and the remainder placed in the Police Stations 
lor distribution ; and that advertisement be made 
that said reports are so placed. 

Order authorizing the sale of land belonging to 
the city on Harrison avenue. Albany, Dover and 
Bristol streets, at public auction. 

The orders authorizing purchase of land on East 
street for the erection thereon ot a building for an 
Engine and Hose Company, at an expense not ex- 
ceeding $30,000. and lor a loan of $30,000 to be ap- 
propriated therefor, were read once. 

Mr. Tucker of Ward Six moved a suspension of 
the rules for their passage at this time. 

Mr. Wadsworth of Ward Four inquired what 
necessity there was for immediate action. 

Mr. Tucker replied that one week's time would 
be so much help m the matter, and it was desira- 
ble to forward the work so as to make sure that 
the Duilding would be covered in betore next win- 
ter. 

The rules were suspended, and the orders being 
on their passage, 

Mr. Snow of Ward Eleven said this was the first 
time be had heard of this matter. He wished to 
know something of the necessity for this building, 
the locality, the plans, and other details for the 
structure, and whether the matter had been under 
consideration of the Committee on Fire Depart- 
ment. If it had not been before that committee, 
he should be in tavor of having it so referred now, 
but would not make themotion at present. 

Mr. Tucker replied that the subject had been 
under consideration before the Committee on 
Public Buildings and the Committee on Fire De- 
partment, both of whom were in favor of it. The 
present building was entirely unfit for the pur- 
pose, and the land could be sold at a great ad- 
vance. 

The orders were passed, yeas 53, nays 1— Ingalls 
of Ward Twelve. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

The order for Committee on Institutions to as- 
certain whether a more eligible location can be 
obtained whereon to erect a new Hospital for the 
Insane than the one in Winthrop was read a sec- 
ond time and passed. 



The order for a joint committee to make arrange- 
ments for furnishing music on the Common, at 
East and South Boston and the Highlands, was 
considered. 

Mr. Gay of Ward Ten moved to add Franklin 
square to the places where music shall be fur- 
nished, and that the appropriation be increased 
from $2500 to $3000. 

Mr. Batchelder of Ward Four opposed the mo- 
tion, tor if adopted, there would be equal reason 
to add Louisburg square, Maverick square, and 
other places. 

Mr. Gay replied that the people of that vicinity 
were a great way from the Common, and that last 
year music was orovided there at the expense of 
the residents. The motion was lost -15 to 20. 

Mr. Klota of Ward Fourteen stated that ihe pro- 
vision was for $2500, tor concerts once or twice 
each week, and he moved to strike out the num- 
ber of times, leaving it discretionary with the Com- 
mittee who may be appointed. The motion was 
rejected, and the order was passed. 

The President subseauently appointed as the 
Committee under the order, Messrs. Ba*cholder ot 
Ward Four, Pote of Ward One, and Rogers of 
Ward Fiiteen. 

COMMUNICATIONS FROM VARIOUS DEPARTMENTS. 

A communication was received from the School 
Committee requesting the erection of a new pri- 
mary schoolhouse on a lot between Tremont street 
and Siiawmut avenue. 

Referred to Committee on Public Instruction. 

A communication was received trom the City 
and County Treasurer, with a statement of the 
county accounts for the past ysar. 

Referred to the Committee on the Treasury De- 
partment. 

The Auditor's Monthly Exhibit, dated May 7, 
was presented, making an exnibit of the general 
and special appropriations for the oresent finan- 
cial year of 1809-70, as shown by the "books of his 
office May 1, 1809, including the May draft, being 
the first month's payment of fie financial year, 
exhibiting the original appropriations, the amount 
expended, and the balances of each unexpended 
at that date. 

A recapitulation of the appropriations and ex- 
penditures gave the following result: 
Appropriations, 

Revenues, etc. Expended. Unexpended. 
General. $8,710,498 55 $294,094 50 $8,410,401 0.5 
Special.. 2,553,571 77 29,505 18 2,524,006 59 



$11,264,070 32 $323,659 68 $10,940,410 64 
The document, numbered 47, City Documents, 
was ordered to be sent up. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteen, from the Join t Stand- 
ing Committee on Public Buildings, who were di- 
rected to consider and report on the expediency of 
adding a portion of the land recently purchased 
for a primary schoolhouse site on Appleton street 
to the Rice Sehooluouse yard, having carefully 
considered the subject, reported a recommenda- 
tion that a strip of land twenty-five feet wide, ex- 
tending from Appleton street to a passage way on 
the easterly side of the Rice Schoolhouse, oe added 
to the yard of that house, and that the location of 
the outbuildings be changed. 'They thereiore 
recommend the passage of the following order: 

Ordered, That the Committee on Public Build- 
ings be authorized to take jrom the lot recently 
purchased for a Primary Schoolhouse site on Ap- 
pleton street a strip of land twenty -five feet wide, 
extending irom Appleton street to the passage 
way on the easterly side of the Rice Schoolhouse, 
and add the same to the yard of the said school- 
nouse ; and to nhange the location ot the out-build- 
mgs— the expense thereof to be charged to the ap- 
propriation for Grammar Schoolhouse, Ward Nine. 

Mr. Keith said he wished merely to make a sin- 
gle statement in relation to this matter. The lot 
tor the Rice Schoolhouse was purchased first. The 
lot for the Primary Schoolhouse is the largest, 
while the accommodations were for but half the 
number of pupils that belonged to the Rice school, 
the number accommodated m the Grammar 
Schoolhouse being 850, to some 400 in the Primary 
Schoolhouse. 

On motion of Mr. Hopkins of Ward Ten, the 
rules were suspended, when the order was read a 
second time and passed. 



MAY 13, 1869 



120 



Mr. Richards of Ward Eight, from she Commit- 
tee on Streets of the Common Council, to whom 
was referred the order of the Board of Aldermen 
of May 3, to widen Boylston street by taking 240 
square ieet of land of Warren Sherburne, at an 
expense of $4250, made a report that in their iudg- 
ment the order ought to pass. 

The order was read a seconu time and passed 

Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteen offered the following 
order : 

Ordered, That the Committee on Public Build- 
ings be authorized to erect an iron fence on that 
part of the Lewis Sehoolhouse lot abutting on 
Dale and Sherman streets, at an estimated cost of 
$3000, to be charged to the appropriation for Gram- 
mar Schools, Public Buildings. 

In explanation of the order. Mr. Keith stated 
that the schoolhouse was erected last year, and no 
provision was made for fencing the lot. Occupy- 
ing a position on the corner of two streets, it was 
desirable tha- a fence should be erected at once. 

Petition- A petition was presented from Kliza 
A. Sanford, owner of estates No. 35 and 37 Middle- 
sex street, asking for compens tion for damapes 
for alteration in sewers. Referred to Committee 
on Claims. 

OKDEKS. 

Mr. Nelson of Ward Nine offered the following 
order, which was passea: 

Ordered, That ttie Committee on Ordinances be 
directed to inquire it any further action is necessa- 
ry to regulate the passage of teams, wagons, or 
other vehicles in the public streets of this city, 
and report an ordinance if deemed advisable. 

On motion of Mr. Hall of Ward One, the Presi- 
dent of the Common Council was added to the 
Committee of the City Government on the enter- 
tainment of members of the Homoeopathic Conven- 
tion to meet in this city on the 8th ot June. 

Mr. Frost ot Ward Nine offered an order that 
the Committee on State Aid be authorized Co ex- 
pend $1000 as temporary aid to such disabled sol- 
diers and sailors as are in necessitous circumstan- 
ces, whose cases are not covered by the acts of the 
Legislature under which State aid is afforded to 
soldiers and sailors. 

Mr. Wadsworth of Ward Four hoped the order 
would not be passed without reference to some 
committee, and moved its reference to the com- 
mittee on State Aid. 

Mr. Frost stated that by the terms of the order, 
carefully lrametl for that purpose, it would go to 
the Committee on State Aid. There were some 
cases in which aid was much needed, where the 
parties were very deserving. The order was so 
worded that it would go directly to that commit- 
tee, and if they see fit they may give this aid. If 
any gentleman baa any doubts on the subject, he 
could show them cases which would open their 
pockets if they did not authorize this aid to be 
given from the city treasury. 

Mr. Wadsworth said it was usual to refer such 
orders to a committee before passing them, and 
not afterwards. If passed lirst, the committee will 
feel themselves directed to give aid, without being 
under any responsibility for their action. It was 
best that action should be taken on the order by 
the committee, befare paying away money. This 
method of doing business was a back-handed way 
which he aid not approve ot. He hoped the order 
would first go to the Committee on State Aid. 

Mr. Frost said he knew this was an unusual way of 
passing such orders, but he pressed the matter be- 
cause there were certain parties who must have 
lelief. He knew ot one instance 'n which a miu 
was far gone in consumption, and may be in his 
grave before a committee can report upon this 
subject and authoiity be given to them afterwards 
to afford relief. Ttiis was the quickest way of 
meeting such cases. Not a dollar was asked which 
was not appropriated for the purpose, and this 
could do do injury to any on°,. 

Mr. Jenks of Ward Three said the wliole matter 
could be disposed of with perfect ease by a petition 
to the Legislature. All of such cases in his district 



had been so disposed of, and an allowance had 
been obtained. The Commonwealth was where 
the aid should come from. 

Mr. Wadsworth said that the committee could 
report at the next meeting, which would be but 
one week. The poor we have with us always, and 
if we relieve all such cases without authority, or a 
report of a committee to the judiciousness of such 
action, we shall have our hands full. He was will- 
ing to vote for it if the committee reported in favor 
of it, but if action should now be taken he should 
go against it. 

Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteen said the committee 
could only do what the Legislature confers the 
power to do, and they had no right to expend 
money which could not be refunded by the State. 
It was therefore proper that the orrier should go 
to the Committee on State Aid that it might make 
inquiries as to the legality of such action. 

The motion to refer to the Committee on State 
Aid was carried. 

On motion of Mr. Ingalls of Ward Twelve, the 
order lor tbe Mayor to petition the General Court 
of 1870 for authoiity to purchase or take lands for 
a Public Park in the vicinity of Chestnut Hill Res- 
ervoir; and thattne Water Board be requested to 
bond lots that may be offered on reasonable terms, 
was taken from the table. Mr. Ingalls said he aid 
not ask to take this order from the table because 
he was in favor ot it, for he was not. He was op- 
posed to purchasing parks outside tue city limits, 
and thought there had been enough expended for 
the driveway around the reservoir, and he was op- 
posed to any expenditures ot this kind for a public 
park. Next year would be soon enough to act 
upon it, and the City Government of 1870 could 
petition tne Legislature if it deemed advisable. 

Mr. Wadsworth of Ward Four agreed with the 
gentleman, for he did not believe it' was necessary 
to purchase land for the protection of the reser- 
voir, and was opposed to expending any more for 
the driveway or a public park in the vicinity of the 
reservoir. 

Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteen thought it unwise to 
purchase lots outside of the city limits for the 
purpose of laying out a publicpark. Itwas under- 
stood that these lots had already been taken up by 
parties on speculation, and there was no occasion 
tor the laying out of large sums of money for the 
adornment of parks in other towns. The bill for 
the annexation of Dorchester had been passed tri- 
umphantly today in one branch of the Leg- 
islature, and he did not doubt that it would 
pass as overwhelmingly in the otner branch. 
Neither was there much doubt that the act 
would be accepted by the people of Boston and 
Dorchester. In that town there were hun- 
dreds of ac r es of land which could be purchased 
for a small sum, and it would cost but a moderate 
price for adorning it. It would be much more 
suitable to expend the money for a public park 
within the limits of the city, instead of laying out 
one for the benefit of Brookline and Brighton. If 
we go to Brighton, it will be fifty years, perhaps, 
before annexation will bring that territory to the 
city. It would be the height of folly to purchase 
land for a public park outside of the limits of the 
city. 

The order was rejected. 

On motion of Mr. Richards of Ward Eight, the 
orders to take the estates of Hannah Bradford, 
Isaac Packard, and J. G. Russell, for the purpose 
of widening Matthews street, the same having 
been surrendered to the city, were taken from the 
table, when they were read a second time and 
passed. 

Mr. Snow of Ward Eleven said he wished to in- 
quire of the Committee on the Celebration of the 
Fourth of July, whether it was designed to cele- 
brate the day on Saturday or on Monday? 

Mr. Butler of Ward Ten replied that the Chair- 
man of the Committee had said this celebration 
would be on Monday. The Committee had not ta- 
ken any vote on the matter, but he judged it would 
be on Monday. 

Adjourned. 



121 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN, 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 

MAY 17 1869. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Board ot Al- 
dermen was held this afternoon, at iour o'clock, 
Mayor Shurtleff presiding. 

APPOINTMENTS MADE AND CONFIRMED. 

Weigher of Coal— Wm. H. Calrow, Jr. 

Special Police Officers Without Pay — Andrew Mer- 
rill, for duty on Foster's wharf, Alfred Parker, for 
duty at Boston & Albany Kailroad wbaif. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFEREED. 

George Hminan and others, that edgestones be 
reset in Winthrop street, East Boston. 

Margaret Briody, that the city would raise her 
house to the grade of Cabot street in front of her 
estate, in lieu of paying damages therefor. 

W. H. Banks and others, for sidewalks in Eutaw 
street, between Meridian and Brooks streets. 

J.E. Hartshorn, that Day street may be put in 
order, as prayed tor in his petition filed in 1868. 

James Deluce and others, that Fourth street, 
from K to M streets, be paved. 

Nash, Spaulding & Co. and others, for leave to 
lay four inch iron pipe under Broad street from 
their store, 241 Broad street, to Arch wharf, to con- 
vey molasses liom an iron vessel in which it is 
imported in bulk, to tanks in the basement ot said 
store. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Paving. 

Wm. K. Gray and others, against the proposed 
widening of St. James street. 

J. B. Moors, for abatement of assessment for 
widening Congress and High streets. 

J. H. Hunneman and others, against the pro- 
posed widening of St. James street. 

Tremont Improvement Company, for extension 
of Sterling street to Washington street. 

SeveraUy referred to the Committee on Streets. 

O. Loring, for leave to erect a booth on the 
Charles street mall, near Boylston street, from 
June 1 to July 5. 

H. W. Fernald, for leave to erect a booth on Tre- 
mont street mall near Boylston street, from June I 
to July 5. 

Severally referred to the Committee on the Com- 
mon. 

Jesse L. Nason, for appointment as an auction- 
eer in this city. Referred to Committee on Li- 
censes. 

Massachusetts Charitable Mechanics' Associa- 
tion, tor leave to construct a temporary building 
in South Market street, in aid of their exhibition. 
Referred to Committee on the Market. 

Sundry teachers in the Washington Village 
School and in the Norcross School, that the streets 
around said schoolhouses be watered. Referred 
to Committee on Public Buildings. 

Julia Fernald, to be allowed a portion of the 
expense attending the last illness of her late hus- 
band, Mark Fernald, Lieutenant of Police. Re- 
ferred to Committee on Police. 

Lewis E. Cotton, against the erection of a wood- 
en projection in the rear of No. 697 Tremont street. 
Referred to Committee on Public Lands. 

Heirs of Mary Tileston, for a sewer in Purchase 
street, from Congress street to Summer street. 
Referred to the Committee on Sewers. 

Gas lamp-lighters, for increase of wages. Re- 
ferred to Committee on Lamps. 

Bay State Brick Co., for leave to build a stable 
for more than four horses on Stanhope street. Re- 
ferred to the Committee on Health. 

A remonstrance was presented by Alderman 
Baldwin, from George H. Nichols and others, resi- 
dents of Chester park, from Washington street to 
Harrison avenue, against the clrange of the name 
of that portion of the street to East Chester park. 
A hearing was ordered on the remonstrance for 
Monday next, at 4 o'clock. 

NOTICES OF INTENTION TO BUILD. 

T. K. Daunt, D street, between First and Second 
streets; Nathaniel Adams, Nos. 4 and 5 Bowker 



street; Brown & Leavitt, 257 Beacon street; John 
McBarren, 374 Shawmut avenue; Thomas Sprague 
corner of Federal ana Purchase streets; John A. 
Ryan, 5 South Margin street ; George Wirtb, Cam- 
den street, between 'Washington street and Shaw- 
mut avenue; J. O'Sullivan, Smith street; Samuel 
Small, Lexington street, between Marion and Mer- 
idian streets; Torreys & Co., 78 Beverly street; G. 
T.W. Braman, River street; C. G. Bird, Jr., corner 
of Albany and Hampden streets; J. F. & D.J. 
Haines & Co., Monmouth street, between Meri- 
oian and Marion streets; M. Munroe, 58 Eliot 
street; Thomas Crosby, corner of E and Ninth 
streets ; Danielson & Johnson, corner of Fruit and 
Charles streets ; Dean & Pyne. Dudley street, be- 
tween Vine street and Grove Hall avenue; Geo. E. 
Sbackley, 247 Broadway; A. H. Glover, coi. Castle 
street and Village place; A. Frink, corner of Pel- 
ham and Washington streets; Thomas Scott, Mil- 
ford place; Kussell Scott, Harrison avenue near 
Eustis street ; C. Tilden, Jr., Warren place; R. S. 
Wade, corner of Shawmut avenue and Dedham 
street ; L. Weissbein, corner of Centre and Gard- 
ner streets. Severally referred to the Committee 
on Streets. 

AUDITOR'S REPORT ON LEASES BY THE CITY. 

A communication was received from the Audi- 
tor, in compliance with Section 15 of the Ordi- 
nance on Finance, with a statement of the leases 
of the property owned by the city as they existed 
May 1,1869: 
Lot corner ot Water and Washington 

streets, lease expires Sept. 1, 1871 $1,000 

Greenhouse, Public Garden, Oct. 1, 1870 1,200 

Two houses on Hamilton street, tenants at 

will 776 

House on Bridge street, April 1, 1870 400 

Market houses, as per Schedule of Super- 
intendent 83,071 

Under jurisdiction of Public Buildings 34.411 

Public Lands 3,695 

Total $124,553 

The schedule relating to the Market Houses 

gives the following results : 

Stalls and cellars under Quincy Hall $62,706 

" " " " FaneuilHall 17,970 

Outside stands 1,995 

Public scales — 400 



$83,071 
These leases all expire June 30, 1870. 

The leases under direction of the Public Land 
Department are as foUows : 
Part of wharf, Albany street, lease to July, 

1871 $1,000 

Swett's whari, lease to May 1, 1872 700 

Lot, Dedham street, no lease 400 

Lot, Albany street, no lease 150 

Lot, House ot Correction 150 

Lot, East Chester park 120 

Lot, Fourth street, South Boston 50 

$2,570 
The property leased by the Committee on Pub- 
lic Buildings is as foUows: 
Old State House, leased for ten years, from 
July 1, 1866, Thompson & Co., and 

others $21,000 

Quincy Hall, Massachusetts Charitable 

Mechanics Association 7,000 

Bridge estate, S. D. Bates 501) 

David Block, store on Court street 600 

Eastern avenue wharf and dock, Directors 

of Public Institutions, to Jan. 1, 1871 3,000 

Stable on Peoples' Ferry wharf 600 

Dwelling-house, Dudley street 1,000 

Dwelling-house, Washington street, High- 
lands 1,000 

Several other tenements,no leases, amount- 
ing in all to 836 

$34,411 
Ordered to be printed. 

report of board of overseers of the poor. 
Office of Overseers of the Poor, 1 
Central Relief Building, I 
Corner of Chardonand Hawkins streets, f 
May 17, 1869. J 

The Board of Overseers of the Poor respectfully 
submit to the City Government their Annual Re- 
port . 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



122 



The details are embraced in the tabular state- 
ments respectively of the Treasurer and Secretary. 
The aggregate results do not rlifler materially from 
those ot the last year. The expenditures have 
been somewhat larger, while at the same time 
there has been an increase in the amount of the 
Trust Funds which the Board Hold as a corpora- 
tion. 

The routine office business has been about the 
same as usual, and we believe that the system and 
methods of the Board have proved satisfactory to 
our citizens, and meet the claims of that class of 
tbe poor who legitimately look to the city for relief. 
In reviewiog tbe transactions of the year, an allu- 
sion should be made to the consummation of the 
plan for some time contemplated, the erection of 
an independent building for the use ot the Ovei- 
seers ot the Poor, and for the accommodation of 
the various associations of cbainty which relieve 
by material aid and sympathy the suffering of the 
less favored classes of our community. 

The Central Belief Building and the Temporary 
Home, for which liberal appropriations were made 
by the City Government, were finished and oc- 
cupied early in the present year. 

The plan of the centralization of the charitable 
agencies of the city was prominently brought be- 
fore the Municipal Governmeut in 1857, by the 
Provident AsS"Ciation, in a memorial written by 
tbe President, Hon. Bobert C. Winthrop. Upon 
the reorganization of the Board of Overseers of 
the Poor in 1864, with the same gentleman as its 
chairman, the subject in various ways was called 
to the public attention, and finally a lot of land 
was purchased upon which the necessary build- 
ings have been erected. The plan suggested is so 
ably set forth in the memorial, that we have 
deemed it well to affix an extract from it to our 
report, as an appendix, in order that our citizens 
may have full information as to the design 
and objects of the Charity Bureau. The ex- 
perience of a few months gives ample assur- 
ance that the objects contemplated aie to meet 
with a gratifying success, and that we soon 
shall have a more perfect system of public charity 
than any other large city in tne world. The legal 
responsibilities to the poor are met by the Board 
of Overseers, but it is well known that the largest 
class of the virtuous and needy in a great metrop- 
olis are not the native or settlement poor, but are 
those for whom the law makes but slight provis- 
ion except in the crowded State almshouses. To 
tear these people from their homes, from the asso- 
ciations of kindred and friends, to seiid them away 
from us to a public institution, impairs their feel- 
ings of self-respect and pauperizes them, and is 
not an act of humanity, nor does it promote the 
public weal; and henct the usefulness of other or- 
ganizations in addition to those at the public 
charge, who will minister in a limited manner to 
those necessities into which they occasionally fall. 
Several of these organizations are already in the 
building, cooperating with us and with each other 
in benevolent work, 

The Provident Association, tbe Industrial Aid 
Society, the Boston Ladies' Sewing Circle, ahe La- 
dies' Belief Agency, a branch of the Boston Dis- 
pensary, the Committees who have the charge of 
the disfibution of the Massachusetts and the Bos- 
ton Soldiers' Funds, and one of the military Posts, 
are now in active operation in the building, and 
other similar bodies are contemplating having 
their central offices here also. 

The almoneis of the different charitable socie- 
ties thus become acquainted with each other, 
their books of registration are easily consulted, 
imposteis are detected and exposed, and the 
wastelul expenditure of money given by the afflu- 
ent for benevolent purposes is checked and put in 
its proper channel. The use of the rooms occupied 
by these different societies is free of rent, but they 
will be subject to a charge for heating, gas and 
janitor's service. As the building was not intend- 
ed exclusively for the city, it was thought advisa- 
ble when the project was started, to ask the char- 
itably disposed of our citizens to contribute to- 
wards its erection, and a fund was raised tor the 
purpose. 

By an order of the City Council, the office of the 
City Physician was removed from the City Hall to 
our new building. This officer, with his assistants, 
are accommodated with two rooms in the base- 
ment, a convenient location for the multitude of 
the poor who resort to them for gratuitous vacci- 
nation and medical advice. 



In connection with the Central Relief Building 
or Charity Bureau, an edifice was erected for the 
Temporary Home, and the Institution was re- 
moved in January from Charles street to its new 
quarters. With the additional accommodations 
thus placed within the control of the Board, it is 
believed that the peculiar wants of that class for 
which the institution was desigued, will be fully 
met. 

The board are aware of the great care and pru- 
dence which the management of the Home will re- 
quire in its enlarged quarters. Its existence is a 
necessity, as an act oi humanity to the deserving 
and helpless. But a portion oi its benefactions are 
liable to abuse, and great solicitude is telt that it 
may not degenerate into an asylum for the im- 
provident and thriftless, and thus increase an evil 
which it is designed to cure. The institution is at 
this time particularly fortunate in being in charge 
of a matron who seems specially adapted for the 
position. Miss Conyers has had a large experience 
in her duties, and combines great force of charac- 
ter with a tender regard for the unfortunate ones 
committed to her care. She is ably suppoited by 
her assistants, and we commend the experiment 
of this institution in its new home under favorable 
auspices, and trust that its influence will be only 
for good. 

There are some changes which we regret, but 
which experience has proved will be necessary in 
the building, particularly in the heating ariange- 
ments; but as the subject has already been called 
to the attention of the City Government, this brief 
allusion is all that is required at the present time. 
The institution is unrier the direction cf a sub- 
committee of the board. A briet report from the 
matron is herewith submitted: 

"During the year ending April 30, 18C9, there 
were admitted to the Home 1243 persons. Of this 
number 186 were Americans, 696 foreigners, and 
361 children. Number of adoptions, 13 ; lost chil- 
dren restored, 48; 35 nurses furnished situations; 
164 persons found employment : 12,513 single meals 
furnished; 40 adults sent to Tewksbury; 16 chil- 
dren under 12 years, 37 under 1 year, sent to the 
same institution ; 98 persons sent to their friends ; 
380 provided for themselves; 2 births; 4 deaths." 

The Board of Overseers would express their ob- 
ligation to tbe City Government for the liberal 
mears which have been placed at their disposal in 
the erection and furnishing of the new buildings, 
and for the care and custody of the same, which 
has been placed in their hands. It will be their 
endeavor to administer this branch of the public 
service with that regard to economy which, wbiie 
relieving all cases of" honest poverty which come 
within their appropriate sphere, at the same time 
will not be an oppressive burden on our citizens. 
They sympathize with those friends of social 
science who are investigating tbe causes and the 
remedies of that tendency to pauperism and crime 
which is alleged to be one of the results of modern 
civilization. It is not their special province to 
participate in the discussion ot the problem, but 
they trust in the discbarge of their duties they 
will place no obstacle in the way of its solution. 

By an ancient statute of England, it was a penal 
offence "to give alms to a beggar able to work." 
The appalling increase of pauperism in that king- 
dem, growing in a measure out of its modern poor 
laws, shows the wisdom of tne old statute, and is 
a warning to us in this country to so manage this 
branch ot political economy that it will not tend 
to the same results. 

Respectfully submitted by 

F. W. Lincoln, Jr., 
Chairman of the Overseers of the Poor in the city 

of Boston. 

Tbe report of the Overseers for the year ending 
April 30, 1869, exhibits tne following results: 

Receipts. 

Cash on band, May 1, 1868 $5,021 30 

Drafts on City Treasurer 58,000 oo 

Cash from cities and towns 6,787 52 

" from State for relief of sick State 

paupers 9,682 45 

" from State for burial of State pau- 
pers 2,790 00 

" from State from old Roxbury bills . . 287 27 
" from State for board of State paupers 

at Mass. Infant Asylum 676 14 

Total |83,4,J0 68 



123 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



Expenditures : 

Ami paid for burials $2,677 11 

" " cities and towns for relief of 

Boston poor 3,317 4 1 

" expenses City Temporary Home. 10,361 79 
" pensions and grantsat office. . . ,13,592 00 
" immediate relief of persons hav- 
ing no settlement 629 42 

" for coal 7,052 7± 

" for groceries 15,205 70 

" salary of Secretary 2,000 00 

" " book-keeper 1,500 00 



" clerks. 

" visitors , 

office expenses. 

transportation ol visitors 

salaries of engineer and janitor, 
acc't of sundry places to be re- 
funded 



574 99 

3,000 00 

345 96 

78 65 

496 87 

12-1 37 



Total expenditures $62,157 01 

Cash received iroru State and cities and 

towns.... 17,177 19 



Total $79,334 20 

Cash balance 4,116-18 

Number and description of persons aided during 
the year ending April 30, lb69: Settlements in 
Boston by taxes, 546; by service in army or navy, 
266— total 812 cases ; 95 city cases aided elsewbere 
and paid for by Boston, making 907 ; aid refunded 
for 253 settlements in otber cities and towns; 626 
sick State charges, amount relunded by State; 78 
non-settlement cases temporarily aided ; 14 relief 
cases on account of service in army or navy. 
Making a total ot 1908, with, an average of three 
persons to each family, or 5724 persons in all. A 
condensed statement shows a total expenditure of 
$62,157 01 ; charged to cities and towns, $7451 27 ; 
to State, $13,373 25; making a total charge else- 
where of $20,827 52, and leaving the actual cost to 
the city ol $41,329 49. 

The reports were laid, on the table, and ordered 
to be printed. 

HEARINGS ON ORDERS OF NOTICE. 

The hearings on the several orders of notice, on 
the proposed rebuilding of a sewer ou Warren ave- 
nue, between Berkeley and Clarendon streets; on 
the construction of a sewer in Ward street ; on the 
proposed widening of Harrison avenue, notice to 
S. & A. E. Whittier ; on the laying out of Claren- 
don street, between Appleton street and Columbus 
avenue; were taken up. No person appearing in 
either case, the reports were recommitted. 

The hearing on the proposed assessment of bet- 
terments lor the widening of Hanover street, was 
taken up. 

Ceo. Wm. Phillips appeared for Mr. Bancroit, 
lessee of an estate at the corner of Hanover and 
Union streets. Mr. Phillips stated that Mr. Ban- 
croft has a lease tor a, term of years, conditional 
upon a return ot the property in as good a condi- 
tion as he received it. The proposed widening 
would take a large portion of the land, and placed 
the lessee in a difficult position in which he could 
not extricate himself except by a liberal allowance 
for damages. 

Alderman Talbot stated that parties had the 
remedy under the betterment law of surrendering 
tneir property to the city. The city could not help 
Mr. Bancroft in any good or bad trade which he 
may have made with the owner of the property. 

The report was recommitted. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be 
authorized to repave a portion of Meridian street 
and the street adjacent to Central square* also to 
lay suitable cross walks at various points on said 
Meridian street, at an estimated cost of $4000. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be 
authorized to grade Newman street.from Dorches- 
ter street to Lowland street, at an estimated cost 
of $10,000. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be 
authorized to pave Wareham street, from. Harri- 
son avenue to Albany street, and a portion of Mai- 
den street, at an estimated cost of $10,000. 

Ordered, That the Superinterdent of Streets in 
the execution of the order passed by the Board 
of Aldermen, July, 1868, for the paving of Ricn- 
mond street from Hanover street to Salem street, 
be directed to substitute wooden pavement in 
place of the small granite blocks provided for in 
said order. 



Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be 
authorized to repave Cross street, between North 
and Hanover streets, at au estimated cost of 
$2000. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be 
authorized to pave School street and Chapman 
place with wooden pavement, at an estimated cost 
of $9500. 

Ordered, That a special Committee, consisting 
of three on the part of 1 his Board with such as the 
Common Council may join, be appointed to make 
arrangements tor the annual excursion of the City 
Council in Boston harbor; the expense attending 
ihesametobe charged to the appropriation for 
incidentals. 

Aldermen Baldwin, Seaver and Fairbanks were 
appointe d on said Committee. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be 
authorized to remove the stone pavement from 
Webster avenue and repave said avenue with 
bricks, at an estimated cost of $800. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be 
authoiized to pave Tremont street, between Win- 
ter and Avon streets, with wooden pavement, at 
an estimated cost ot $4000. 

The following order was considered, as appended 
to the report of the Committee on Public Instruc- 
tion, made at the last meeting of the Board : 

Ordered, That there be allowed and paid to the 
Trustees of the Roxbury Latin School the sum of 
$3000, to be expended in such manner as they shall 
deem expedient, for the maintenance of said 
school; provided that said Trustees shall make 
the annual report mentioned in the act of the 
Legislature concerning said school, approved 
April 13, 1809, said sum to be transferred for that 
purpose from the Reserved Fund. 

The question was taken, and the order was re- 
fused its passage by the following vote : 

Yeas— Bradlee, Hawes, James, Pratt, Rice, 
W^hite 

Nays— Baldwin, Fairbanks, Richards, Seaver, 
Talbot, VanNostxand, 

PAPERS FROM THE COMMON COUNCIL. 

The petition of Eliza A. Sanford, for compensa- 
tion for alteration of sewers, was referred, in con- 
currcncc. 

The order proposing to furnish ai 1 1 to certain 
disabled soldiers and sailors who have no legal 
claims thereto, was referred, in concurrence. 

The Auditor's Monthly Exhibit was ordered to 
be placed on file. 

The request of School Committee for a Gram- 
mar Schoolhouse site in Ward Fourteen, near 
Ruggles street, was referred, in concurrence. 

The Annual Accounts of City and County Treas- 
urer ; were referred to Joint Committee on Treas- 
ury Department, in concurrence. 

The lollowing orders were passed in concur- 
rence i 

Order for Committee on Institutions to see if a 
more eligible site for a Lunatic Hospital than that 
at Winthrop can be procured, 

Order to erect an iron fence on a portion of the 
Lewis Schoolhouse lot, $3000. 

Order for Committee on Ordinances to inquire if 
farther municipal legislation is necessary to regu- 
late the passage of vehicles in the public streets. 

Order to add the President of the Common Coun- 
cil to the Committee on Hospitalities to Homoeo- 
pathic Convention. 

Report and order to increase the yard and alter 
location of privies of the Rice School. 

The order for a Joint Special Committee to pro- 
vide music on the Common, &c, was passed in 
concurrence, and Aldermen White and Fairbanks 
were joined to the committee on the subject. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Alderman White, from, the Committee on Li- 
censes, reported in favor of licenses to four boot- 
blacks, one newsboy and one boy to sell shoe-lac- 
ings- Accepted. . ■ 

Also licenses to sundry persons as innholders,. 
victuallers, auctioneer, wagon licenses and for. the 
transfer of wagon licenses. Accepted. 

Also, a license to Michael JDonnovan, for leave to 
give an exhibition at 119 Haverhill street. Accept- 
ed. 

Alderman Fairbanks, from the Committee on 
Sewers, reported leave to withdraw on petition of 
Patrick Barry, for an abatement of an assessment 
for a sewer on Broadway. Accepted. 



MAY 17, 1869. 



124 



AMerman Van Nostrand, from the Committee on 
the Assessors' Department, reported that the or- 
der to refund certain taxes assessed on Bridget 
Kavanagh, in 1863, ought to pass. Keport accept- 
ed and oraer passed. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on 
Streets, reported no action necessary on sundry 
notices of intention to build. Accepted. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on 
Claims, reported leave to withdraw on the peti- 
tion of Charles McCarthy for compensation for al- 
leged injuries by improper location of fire alarm 
telegraph. Accepted. 

Alderman White, from the Committee on 
Health, reported that leave he granted to Wilson 
& Buzzell to erect a stable for more than four 
horses at the corner of Federal and Alger streets. 
Accepted. 

Alderman White also reported leave to with- 
draw on petition ot J. H. Chadwick and others, 
that unimproved streets in the city be watered at 
the public expense. 

Also an order, which was passed, as follows: 

Ordered, That George W. Decatur be authorized 
to sprinkle streets with salt water in the High- 
lauds, upon such terms and conditions as the oc- 
cupants of buildings and the owners of vacant 
lands may agree with said Decatur, subject to such 
rules and regulations for watering streets as have 
been adopted by the Board of Aldern.en. 

Also the following order, which was adopted : 

Ordered, That the order heretofore passed au- 
thorizing Owen Nawn to sprinkle certain streets 
in the Highlands, be revoked, and that he be au.- 
thorized to sprinkle said streets with salt water, 
upon such terms and conditions as the occupants 
of buildings and the owners ot vacant lands may 
agree with the said Nawn, subject to such rules 
and regulations for watering streets as have been 
adopted by the Board of Aldermen. 

Alderman Richards, from the Committee on Fire 
Alarms, reported leave to withdraw on the peti- 
tion of the Engineers of the Fire Department and 
the Firemen in the Highlands, and ot John T. 
Clark and others, for a fire alarm bell on the Lewis 
School building ; and no action necessary on the 
petitions ot A. P. Hawkins and others, lor repairs 
on Wells Schoolhouse alarm bell and apparatus. 
Accepted. 

Alderman Richards, from the same Committee, 
on the petition of Smith & Jacobs and others, that 
an alarm bell be placed on the Novelty Works, 
Wareham street, reported that in their opinion 
the most suitable place for the location ot an 
alarm bell for this section of the city would be on 
the city stable, and therefore recommended the- 
passage of the following order: 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Fire 
Alarms, under the direction of the Committee on 
that department, be authorized to place one of the 
bells not now in use on the city stable on Albany 
street and connect therewith the necessary appa- 
ratus forgiving alarms in case of fire; the expense, 
not exceeding $600, to be charged to the appropria- 
tion for Fire Alarms. 

Alderman Hawes, from the Committtee on 
Steam Engines, to whom was recommitted the 
petition of Joseph Coolidge for leave to place a 
steam engine and boiler in his building, at the 
corner of Charles and Cambridge streets, and to 
whom weie referred the remonstrances ot the Man- 
agers of the Eye and Ear Infirm aiy, Otis Clappand 
others, and E. H. Derby and others, against grant- 
ing said petition, submitted the following re- 
port: 

It appeared in the evidence presented to the 
committee that duriug most of the time from 1842 
or 1843 to 18C5 a steam engine and boiler were used 
in this locality. At the time the Eye and Ear In- 
firmary was erected, about 1848, there was 
a twelve-horse power engine in operation in 
a small building, with a low chimney, which 
caused much smoke and dust. In 1853 the 
old building burned down and the present 
structure was erectpd on the same site. A steam 
engine was put in and continued in operation un- 
til 1865, when it was taken out and sold for the 
reason that it did not pay to run it for the persons 
who then occupied the building. At the present 
time, the building is occupied for a great variety 
of purposes. The different rooms are heated by 
stoves in such a manner that the danger from fire 
is very great. 

The building was erected and can be used ad- 
vantageously only tor mechanical purposes; and 



the owner has agreed to make such alterations and 
take such precautions as the Board of Aldermen 
may direct, in order to secure perfect safety and 
prevent any disturbance or annoyance of those 
living in the vicinity. 

In view of these facts, the Committee respect- 
fully recommend that the license be granted, upon 
the conditions named in the accompanying order. 

Ordered, That a license be granted to Joseph 
Coolidge to set up and use a steam engine and 
boiler in the Duilding on the corner of Charles and 
Cambridge streets, upon the following conditions, 
namely: That the boiler shall be placed in afire- 
proof arch as near Cambridge street as practica- 
ble ; that an extra patent safety valve be attached 
to it; that the power shall be used only for the 
manufacture of furniture ; that the entire building 
shall be heated by steam; that the steps on tne 
southerly side shall De removed ; that iron shut- 
ters shall be put on the windows on the southerly 
side; that the wall between said building and the 
Eye and Ear Infirmary snail be increased in height 
if required by jthe managers of said Infirmary ; and 
that any additional buiiding which may be erected 
shall be constructed of brick. 

Alderman Fairbanks, from the same committee, 
offered a minority report, as iollows: 

When the Eye and Ear Infirmary was erected, 
there was a small building thirty-five feet square 
and two stories high, on the corner of Charles and 
Cambridge streets, so that a considerable space 
intervened between the two buildings. The pres- 
ent building has a front of seventy leet on Charles 
street, extending nearly to the southern boundary 
of the estate. It the petition is granted, an engine 
of fifty horse power will be introduced , and the 
building, five stories in height, will be filled with 
combustible materials, used in the manufacture of 
furniture. It Cannot be doubted for a moment, 
that aside from the nuisance caused by the 
smoke and noise from such a large es- 
tablishment, the danger irom fire would be 
greatly augmented. The high rates charged by 
insurance companies on such establishments show 
that the increased danger has been reduced to a 
mathematical certainty. There is more or less 
danger, also, from an explosion of the boiler, what- 
ever the restrictions may be under which the li- 
cense is granted. 

Believing that the danger from fire, and the 
noise, smoke and dust caused by a large manufac- 
turing establishment would seriously impair the 
usefulness of a charitable institution which is de- 
serving of the utmost consideration and encour- 
agement, and believing, also, that the property 
can be u<sed for other purposes without detriment 
to the owner, the undersigned would respeotiully 
recommend that the petitioner have leave to 
withdraw. 

The minority report was substituted for the re- 
port of the majority, and was accepted. 

ORDERS OF NOTICE. 

On the proposed construction oi a sewer in Cabot 
street, between Culvert street and Linden park, 
and in Vernon street, between Belmont and Cabot 
streets. Hearing Monday, May 24, 4 P. M. 

On the nroposed construction of a sewer in Bain- 
bridge street, northerly end. Hearing Monday, 
May 24, 4 P. M. .., . 

On the proposed rebuilding of the sewer in Or- 
chard street, and in Eustis street between Orchard 
and Dearborn streets. Hearing Monday, May 24-, 
4 P. M. 

On the proposed laying out of Pearl place and 
its extension trom Pearl to Oliver street. Hear- 
ing Monday, May 31, 4 P. M. 

On the proposed laying out of Humphrey place, 
from Hamilton to Broad street. Hearing Monday, 

Mav 31 4 P M. 

On the proposed widening cf Bedford street, at 
the corner ot Kingston street, on the notice of 
John K. Hall of intention to build. Hearing Mon- 
day, May 31, 4 P. M. 

ORDERS PASSED. 

Alderman Baldwin, from the Committee on Ar- 
mories, reported the following orders, which were 

^Ordered, That the armory occupied by Company 
A Ninth Regiment of Infantry M. V. M., at No.54 
Pitts street, be approved as a suitable place tor 
the deposit of arms. 

Ordered, That the armory occupied by Company 
K,lst Regiment of Infantry M. V. M. at No. 154 



125 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



Broadway, be approved as a suitable place for the 
deposit of arms, and that there be allowed ana 
paid for rent ot said armory a sum not exceeding 
$600 per annum. 

Ordered, That there be allowed and paid from 

the 12th May, 1869. until otherwise ordered, the 

sum oi $300 tor rent of an armory for the field and 

s taft officers of the First Regiment Infantry Mass. 

Volunteer Militia. 

On motion of Alderman Talbot, 

Ordered, That there be paid to B. C. White, 
agent ior the heirs ot Isaac Packard, $7000 for their 
estate on Matthews street, surrendered to tbe city 
under the betterment law by an order of the Board 
approved May 14, 1869, upon his giving a deed of 
the same. 

Ordered, That there be paid to Joseph G. Kussell 
$7000 lor his estate on Matthews street, surren- 
dered to the city, under the betterment law, by an 
order of the Board, approved May 14, 1869, upon 
his giving a deed of the same. 

Ordered, That there be paid to Warren Sherburne 
and James W. Rollins, lessee, $4250, for land taken 
and damages occasioned by the widening of Boyl- 
ston street, by a resolve approved May 14, 1869. 

Ordered, That Cambridge street be widened, on 
its northerly side at the corner ot Staniford street, 
by taking land of George C. Shattuck, (N. J. Brad- 
lee, attorney,) containing 184 square leet, more or 
less; also another parcel of land belonging to 
George C. Shattuck, containing 165 square teet; 
also a parcel of land Delonging to George C. Shat- 
tuck and Nathaniel J. Bradlee (Trustees), contain- 
ing 167 square feet; also a parcel of land belong- 
ing to Otis Daniel), Nathaniel Walker and Moses 
P. Grant (Trustees), containing 378 square leet, the 
whole expense amounting to $4475. 

Ordered, That the assessment heretofore order- 
ed on Willard Phillips for High street betterments, 
be apportioned into three parts. 

On motion of Alderman White, an order was 
passed for the abatement of nuisances. 

On motion of Alderman Richards, 

Ordered. That the Committee on Public Build- 
ings be authorized to repair Police Station House 
No. 7, at an estimated cost of $1000, to be charged 
to the apppropriation for Public Buildings. 

Ordered, That the Committee on Public Build- 
ings be authorized to furnish the Drake Primary 
Schoolhouse, at an expense not exceeding $1333, to 
be cbarged to the appropriation for Primary 
Schools, Public Buildings. 

On motion ot Alderman James, 

Ordered, That the Chief of Police be directed to 
notify the owners and abutters on the southeast- 
erly corner of Boylston and Berkeley streets to 
lay their sidewalks with brick. 

On motion of Alderman Seaver, 

Ordered, That the Chief ot Police be directed to 
notiiy all persons who have obstructions on Alba- 
ny street, south of Dover street, East Canton 
street, Plympton and Wareham streets, to remove 
said obstructions within ten days from date. 

On motion of Alderman Fairbanks, 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Sewers be 
directed to construct a sewer in Warren avenue, 
between Berkeley and Clarendon streets, and re- 
port a schedule of the expense of the same pursu- 
ant to law. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Sewers be 
directed to construct a sewer in Gates street, and 
report a schedule of the expense of the same pur- 
suant to law. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Sewers be 
authorized to lay the sewer which may be neces- 



sary for the drainage of the Coliseum outside of 
the building, the expense to be charged to the ap- 
propriation for sewers. 

On motion of Alderman Pratt, 
Ordered, That the chairman of the Committee 
on Lamps be and he is hereoy authorized to con- 
tract with Francis H. J enney for furnishing the 
fluid for lighting the streets, "at the rate of one and 
three-tenths mills per hour. 

Ordered, That the Chief of Police notify Brown- 
ing, Picket &, Co., No. 249 Washington street, W. 
C. Fogg, 220 Washington street, Mr. Parker, cor- 
ner of Concord and Washington streets, E. S. 
Johnson, corner of Wasnington and Northampton 
streets, Charles B. tevear, 1883 Washington street, 
K.Taylor, 5 Dock square, M. Mellen, 37 Cornhill, 
Cate & Nickerson. 200 Federal street, Hooper, 
Lewis & Co., 122 State street, Mr. Brett, Harrison 
avenue, Chase & Sears, 47 and 49 Leverett street, 
to remove, within ten days, tbe awnings in front 
of their buildings, as they seriously obstruct the 
light from the street lamps. 

On motion of Alderman Hawes, 

Ordered, That the Committee on Public Instruc- 
tion be requested to consider the expediency of 
purchasing the stable lot on Tyler street, next 
adjoining the Quincy School, and report on what 
terms the the same can be obtained. 

The following order was taken from the table, 
and passed: 

Ordered. That the Committee on Ordinances be 
and they are hereby authorized to employ a mes- 
senger or errand boy for the office of the City Solici- 
tor, at such rate of compensation as they shall 
deem reasonable, and that the expense thereof be 
charged to the appropriation for salaries. 

On motion of Alderman Bradlee, the petition of 
Charles Burrill for adjustment of his claims 
against the city, and petition of Geo. B. Upton and 
others in aid Thereof, were taken from the table. 

Alderman Bradlee stated that at the time the 
petition was presented, the suit of Mr. Burrill was 
still pending against the city. Under the circum- 
stances, the city could not act without giving the 
claimant a great advantage in the courts, should 
he choose to avail himself of it, and on his 
motion the petition was laid on the table. The 
subject has remained in the same condition until 
within a few days, when a copy of a, paper, as fol- 
lows, was lett with the City Solicitor. 

"In the matter of Charles Burrill vs. The City 
of Boston, now pending in the Supreme Court of 
the United States. 

The plaintiff in said case hereby withdraws said 
suit and all further prosecution of the same. And 
he hereby personally and by his counsel pledges 
himself and agrees that such entry may be made 
in said suit, upon the docket as the City Solicitor 
or counsel for the city shall hereafter deem neces- 
sary or advisable." 

(Signed) Charles Burrill. 

As counsel for Mr. Burrill, I agree to the above. 
(Signed) H.W. Paine. 

May 11, 1869. 

And I also. 

(Signed) G. W. Tuxbtjry. 

Alderman Bradlee moved that the papers be 
referred to the Committee on Claims. Carried. 

On motion of Alderman James, the report "leave 
to withdraw," on petition of Wm. L. Burt for 
widening of Devonshire street, at corner of Milk 
street, was taken from the table and recommitted 
to the Committee with instructions to report the 
estimated expense of the proposed widening. 

Adjourned. 



126 



COMMON COUNCIL 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 

MAY 20, 1869. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Common 
Council was held this evening at 8 o'clock, tbe 
President, Wm. G. Harris, in the chair. 

PAPERS FROM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

The petition of the teachers in the Washington 
Village School and iu the Norcross School, rela- 
tive to watering streets around those school- 
houses, was referred in concurrence. 

The petitions of Charles Burrill, lor adjustment 
of his claims against the city, and ot Geo. B. Up- 
ton and others, in aid of the same, were referred 
in concurrence, to the Committee on claims. 

The following order was passed in concurrence: 

Order for Committee on Public Instruction to 
consider the expediency of purchasing the stable 
lot adjoining the Quincy Schoolhouse. 

The following orders were severally read once : 

Order authorizing repair of Police Station No. 
7, at an estimated cost of $1000. 

Order for appointment of Joint Committee to 
make arrangements for the annual excursion of 
the City Council in Boston harbor. 

KeporS and order authorizing one of the bells 
not now iu use to be placed on the City Stable, Al- 
bany street, and the necessary apparatus lor giv- 
ing alarms in en se of lire to be connected there- 
with, at an expense not exceeding $600. 

Order to lurnish the Drake Primary School- 
house at an expense not exceeding $1333. 

The order to relund the tax assessed in 1863 upon 
certain real estate occupied by Bridget Kavanagh, 
and report of tbe Committee on the Assessors' 
Department in lavor thereof, was considered, 
wben the report was accepted, and the order was 
passed, in concurrence. 

The order authorizing the employment of a Mes- 
senger for the office of the City Solicitor was read 
once. A motion was made by Mr. Ingalls ot VV ard 
Twelve that the order take its second reading at 
this time. 

Mr. Jenks of Ward Three wished to know what 
the hurry was lor its passage immediately. It ap- 
peared like springing the matter upon the Coun- 
cil, and he did not see the necessity for it. 

Mr. Ingalls replied that its necessity was in get- 
ting it off the tiles. It involved only the amount 
of $200 or $300, and it had been hanging in the 
Board of Aldermen, and he could see no reason 
for delay. 

Mr. Jenks could see no reason for hurry, nor any 
why the order should be passed now. 

The order was read a second time and passed. 

The following reports were accepted in concur- 
rence: 

Report leave to withdraw on the petition of 
Charles McCarthy to be compensated for personal 
injuries alleged to have been caused by the im- 
proper location of a fire-alarm wire. 

Report no action necessary on the petition 
of A. P. Hawkins et als. for certain repairs on 
the Wells School House alarm-bell and apparatus. 

Report leave to withdraw on the petition of the 
Engineers and Firemen ol Boston Highlands and 
others that an alarm bell be placed on the Lewis 
Schoolhouse. 

COHJIUS ICATIONS . 

A communication was received from tbe Board 
of Assessors, announcing that a vacancy exists in 
the office of Second Asistant Assessors for Ward 
Four, occasioned by the death of A. P. Kollins. 

Bead, and ordered to be sent up. 

The following communication from the Ccchitu- 
ate Water Board, was read and referred to the 
Committee on Water: 

Cochituate Water Board Office, 1 
May 20, 1869. ) 

To the City Council : 

The Cochituate Water Board, believing it to be 
for the interest of the city that negotiations should 
be made with the ciiy of Charlestown lor the sup- 



ply ol that portion of our city known as East Bos- 
ton with the water from Mystic Lake, most 
respectfully request that authority may be given 
them to make such a contract as they in their 
judgment deem wise and expedient. 

We consider it important to have arrangements 
made at an early day, as Charlestown has already 
agreed with the city of Chelsea and the town of 
Somerville, and should any others be added, it; 
would not be prudent for them to undertake to 
supply any portion of our city. 

It must also be borne in mind, if an agreement 
can now be made, it will postpone for a much 
longer time the necessity of another source of sup- 
ply, and that East Boston will be much better sup- 
plied than it ever can be irom Lake Cochituate. 
Respectfully submitted. 

K. J. Bradlee, 
President Cochituate Water Board. 

A communication was received from Col. George 
H . Johnston, addressed to the Mayor, and dated 
May 10, 1869, as follows: 

hear Sir: The 29th day of this month is set apart 
for the purpose of strewingwith flowers the graves 
of those who died in defence ol our country in the 
late war for the Union. Posts 7 and 32 Grand 
Army of the Republic visit Mount Hope Cemetery 
for this purpose, and we would respectfully invite 
you and tbe members of the City Council to be 
presen t with us on that occasion. 
Very respectfully, 

Geo. H. Johnston, 

For Posts 7 and 32. 

It was voted to accept the invitation. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

The President presented a report, from the Com- 
mittee on Soldiers' Relief, to whom was referred 
tbe order authorizing the committee to expend 
$1000 as temporary aid to such disaoled soldiers 
and sailors as are in necessitous circumttances, 
whose cases are not covered by acts of the Legis- 
lature. The committee reported that the order 
ought not to pass. 

Ihe report was accepted, and the order was re- 
jected. 

Mr. Osborn of Ward Six, from the Joint Stand- 
ing Committee on Ordinances, who were instruct- 
ed to consider the propriety of so amending the 
ordinance concerning public buildings as to pro- 
vide that the purchase of land tor school purposes 
shall be made under the direction of the Commit- 
tee on Public Instruction, submitted the following 
report: 

The tenth section of the ordinance in relation 
to public buildings provides that whenever the 
City Council shall order the purchase of any land 
for the purpose of erecting any building thereon, 
said purchase shall be made under the direction of 
the said Committee on Public Buildings. 

Applications from the School Committee for ad- 
ditional school accommodations are invariably re- 
ierred to the Committee on Public instruction; 
and the duty of selecting and recommending to 
the City Council suitable locations tor ne « school- 
houses naturally devolves upon that Committee. 
It not unfrequently happens that tbe best intsrests 
of the city require that the land should be pur- 
chased as soon as selected, and in that case the 
Committee on Public Buildings are placed in tbe 
unpleasant position of being obliged to act upon 
information from others and take the responsibili- 
ty of such action. 

Clearly the responsibility for the whole transac- 
tion should rest where it properly belongs, on the 
Committee on Public Instruction; and unless there 
was a provision in the ordinance to the contrary, 
that committee would undoubtedly be authorized 
to complete its work by making the purchase 
recommended. 

The Committee would therefore respectfully rec- 
ommend the passage of the accompanying ordin- 
ance: 

An ordinanee to amend an ordinance concerning the 
public buildings. 
Section 1. ' The tenth section of the ordinance 
concerning the public buildings, printed on the 
478th page of the laws and ordinances of 1863, is 
hereby amended by adding after the word "there- 
on," in the third line, the words "except for edu- 
cational purposes." 

The question being on reading the ordinance a 
second time, 



MAY 2 0, 1869 



137 



Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteen said he was favorably 
impressed by the report of the Committee, but 
hoped the subiect would lie over for further 
consideration, and so that an opportunity might 
be afforded for comparing the amended ordinance 
with thit now in force. 

Mr. Osborn stated the changes proposed did 

not require much consideration, as they simply 

provided for placing the responsibility for certain 

measures where it belonged. 

Mr. Snow of Ward Eleven raised the inquiry 

i whether uider the rules the ordinance was requir- 

/ ed to lie over. 

The Chair replied that it was not. 
Thereupon said ordinance was read a second 
time and passed. 

Mr. Snow subsequently called attention to rule 
47, relative to second reading ol orders, &c, and 
although he did not wish to raise a ques ion against; 
the decision of the President, he thought the lan- 
guage of toe rule was opposed to more than one 
reading of an ordinance at any session. 

The Chair stated that the interpretation ol Mr. 
Snow was not correct. 

Mr. Nelson of Ward Nine said his reading of the 
rule was that no ordinance imposing penalties 
shall have more than one reading. 

The Chair further stated that the first part of 
the rule required that all ordinances, ordeis and 
resolutions shall have two several readings, »nd 
the last part provided that no orders authorizing 
expenditures of money shall have but one reading 
on the same day. This portion of the rule evident- 
ly had reference to the matter of expenditures, 
because in other cases orders do often take two 
several readings on the same day. 

Mr. Osborn of Ward Six read from tbe rules of 
1866, which met the objection of the gentleman 
from Ward Eleven relative to the punctuation of 
the rule, since the rules of the present year were 
derived from those ot former years. Furthermore, 
the custom of the Council was a precedent in the 
matter. A similar point was raised by him at a 
previous meeting, in reference to the ordinance 
relating to an assistant city clerk, when the Chair 
took the safe side, on the ground that the ordi- 
nance involved the expenditure of money. 

Mr. Wells of Ward Three asked if the ordinance 
under consideration did not involve an expendi- 
ture of money? 

Mr. Osborn of Ward Six reolied that by the pas- 
sage of the amended ordinance no money would 
be expended. 

Mr. Wadsworth of Ward Four raised a question 
of order, that the whole debate was out of order. 
The Chair ruled that the point of order was well 
' taken. 

Mr. Ingalls of Ward Twelve claimed that he had 
the floor before the Chair made its ruling on the 
question of order, by raising another point of or- 
der. That point of order was that the gentleman 
from Ward Four was not in order, as he proceeded 
to speak before being recognized by the Chair, on 
raising his question of order. 

The Chair ruled that this point of order was also 
well taken, and called attention to rule seventeen, 
which if observed would prevent confusion. 

Mr. Tucker of Ward Six, from the Committee on 
the Fire Department of the Common Council, to 
whom was referred the order authorizing tbe pur- 
chase of fire annihilators for the Police Stations and 
Fire Department buildings, made a report that, in 
accordance with the instructions of the Council, 
they have given hearings to all parties interested, 
and they are satisfied, from a careful examination 
of tbe subject, that the American Consolidated 
Company's machine is the most efficient for the 
purposes intended to be accomplished. The Com- 
mittee, theref ere, recommend the passage of the 
order referred to them. 
The order was read a second time and passed. 
Mr. Gray ot Ward Twelve, from the Joint Stand- 
ing Committee on the Treasury Department, to 
whom were referred the accounts of the City and 
County Treasurer for the year ending April 30, 
1869, reported as follows : 

That they have made a careful examination of 
the accounts, and compared them with the records 
in the Treasurer's office, and they And that the en- 
tries correspond with the receipts and vouchers on 
file. 



The business of the office during the 

past year has amounted to. .'. $16,080,675 71 

On county account 226,488 17 

On city account 15,854,187 54 

Being an increase over the previous 

year ot 1,620,608 11 

The balance of cash on hand was 2,661,765 31 

The amount of bonds and notes held 

by the city was 530,231 33 

The amount of bonds lor sales of 

lands purchased for widening 

streets was , 119,282 90 

The amount placed to the credit of 

the Committee on deduction of 

the City Debt was 6,339,757 78 

Viz: 

In bonds of the city 4,458,675 00 

In cash 1,881,082 78 

The Committee desire particularly to commend 
the manner in which the accounts in this depart- 
ment are kept and the admirable system manifest- 
ed in the details ot the office. 

(Signed) Lewis Rice, Chairman. 

The report was read and accepted and sent up. 

PETITIONS. 

A petition was presented from Samuel Little 
and others, owners of real estate on Washington 
street, Southern District, against a change of name 
of a portion of that street. 

A question was raised relative to the presenta- 
tion ot such a petition to the Common Council, 
the subject being entirely under the control of the 
Board of Aldermen, when, on motion of Mr. Keith 
of Ward Fifteen, the petition was ordered to be 
sent up. 

A petition of Charles Faulkner, for removal of 
restrictions on sale of land on East Springfield 
street, was referred to the Committee on Public 
Lands. 

ORDERS PASSED. 

On motion of Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteen, 

Ordered, That the Committee on Public Build- 
ings be authorized to make such repairs and alter- 
ations as may be needed in the various offices of 
the City Hall, the expense thereof to be charged 
to the appropriation tor Public Buildings. 

Mr. Keith stated that the removal of the offices 
of the Health and Lamp Departments had made 
changes necessary in the City Hall, and it was be- 
lieved that the repairs and alterations could well 
be made during the recess. 

Mr. Keith also offered tbe following order: 

Ordered, That the Committee on Public Build- 
ings be directed to cause the Superior Court room 
for criminal business to be properly ventilated, the 
expense to be charged to the appropriation for 
county expenses. 

Mr. Keith, in support of the order, stated that at 
the close of the last term of the Criminal Court, 
Judge Lord called the attention of the grand jury to 
the condition of the court room, declaring it to be 
a nuisance. H e thought the language of the Judge 
to be rather strong at the time. Having occasion 
to try some cases in that court the present week, 
where he rarely practiced, he concurred with 
Judge Lord in all that he said respecting it, as de- 
structive to health and comfort. The court room 
was much more used than any other in the city, 
and being in the upper story of the building, there 
would be no difficulty in securing a proper venti- 
lation of It. 

The order was read a second time and passed. 

Mr. Nelson of Ward Nine offered the following 
order,which he said he did without expressing any 
opinion on the subject : 

Ordered, That the Committee on Public Build- 
ings be directed to consider the expediency of 
erecting on some suitable site, a building for the 
military of the city, furnishing a drill-room and 
suitable apartments for the storage of arms and 
equipments, and thereby saving the large annual 
rental now paid tor armories. 

The order was read twice and passed. 

On motion of Mr. Kich of Ward Fourteen : 

Ordered, That the joint standing Committees 
on Fire Alarms be requested to inquire whether 
any need exists in the southerly part of Ward 
Fourteen for additional means for giving alarms 
in case of fire. 

Adjourned. 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



128 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 

MAY 24, 1869. 



The regular weekly r..eeting of the Board of 
Aldermen was held this afternoon at 4 o'clock, 
Mayor Shurtleff presiding. 

APPOINTMENTS MADE AND CONFIRMED. 

Weigher of Coal— Alonzo H. Stowell. 
Undertaker— Ebenezer Sanborn. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

O. H. Hanlon and others, that Ball street be 
accepted, &c. 

Ralph Haskins and others, against the petition 
ofWm, Whiting and others, for the widening of 
Warren stieet, between Walunt avenue and llock- 
land stieet. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Streets. 

Alvin M. Turner for removal of vaults at Nos. 
204, 206 Athens street. Referred to Committee on 
Health. 

Thomas J. Geyer, for abatement of assessment 
for sidewalk, INos. 38 to 42 Cottage street, East 
Boston. 

William D. Sheriffs and others, that Sumner 
street he graded, &c, from Central square to 
W ebster stieet. 

Kaloh Haskins and others, against the petition 
of William Whiting and others, tor a change of 
grade in Warren street, between Walnut avenue 
and Rockland street. Severally referred to the 
Committee on Paving. 

J. C. Goodwin and others, that the parade 
ground on Boston Common be rolled and put in 
order for a play ground. Referred to a Committee 
on Common. 

Joseph L. Brigham and others, for a sewer m 
Mount Pleasant avenue, from Vine to Dudley 
streets. 

Joseph Garrett, lor a sewer in Saratoga street, 
near Prescott street. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Sewers. 

Teachers in the Lawrence school, that the city 
would sprinkle the streets adjacent to that school- 
house. Referred to the Committee on fublic 
Buildings. 

A petition was presented from J. W. & R. Cava- 
nagh respecting an alleged unfair award for rais- 
ing buildings on Tremont street, between Pleas- 
ant street and the railroad bridge. 

A motion was made to refer it to the Committee 
on the Church Street District for a hearing on the 
subject. 

Alderman Kichards hoped the petition would 
be placed on iile. The subject was acted upon by 
a double committee. The bids were opened by the 
Committee on the Church Street District, and 
after a full consideration they determined to ac- 
cept the terms not of the lowest bidder, but the 
terms of the contractors in whom they had the 
most confidence. Unless some charge of unfair- 
ness could be alleged, he should opyose any fur- 
ther action upon the subject. As one of the com- 
mittee, he did not fear the fullest investigation. 

The Committee had a right under the proposals 
to reject any bid, and to take that which was most 
satisfactory, and if in all like cases a hearing was 
to take place because parties were not satisfied, 
the Board would have more than they could attend 
to. Everybody could not be suited in making con- 
tracts. There is a difficulty about this portion ot 
the Church Street Territory which made it neces- 
sary that the Committee should act with great 
caution. They had agreed with the parties on the 
territory that the work should be don^ in four 
months, and a failure to comply with the agree- 
ment might involve a great loss to the city. They 
must accordingly make their contracts wiih such 
parties as will insure the completion of the work 
without the slightest possibility of a doubt. He 
hoped, therefore, that the petition would be placed 
on tile. 

Alderman Baldwin did not desire to take excep- 
tions to the statements which were made. They 
might be correct, but he hoped the matter mightlie 
over for examination. When bi 's are made to do 



work for $29,000 which others require $31,000 for, 
it the parties were equally responsible as business 
men, there was no reason why they were not en- 
titled to the contract. On inquiries, he had lound 
that in the previous contracts of the Messrs. Cav- 
anagh, their work had been well performed 

Alderman Richards said this was no place for 
giving personal reasons in relation to the matter. 
Mr. Cavanagh knew the reasons for rejecting nis 
bid. Such contract s were a question of opinion as 
10 what was the interest of the city. If there 
had been a difference of $5000, he should have de- 
cided as he did. In this he did not sav that the 
parties whose bid was rejected might not have 
performed the work, hut in his judgment there 
was a doubt, and it was given to those in whom 
the committee had more confidence, as they hart a 
right to do, ana should do lor the interests of the 
city. 

Alderman Baldwin moved a reference to a Joint 
special Committee, which was carried. 

Aldermen Baldwin and Talbot were appointed on 
the committee. 

Alderman Talbot declined serving, as he had 
been mixed up in the matter, and was excused. 

Alderman Baldwin said he di-J not desire to serve 
on the committee, and when he marte the motion 
did not do so with the expectation of being on the 
committee. 

A motion to be excused was lost, when Alder- 
man Bradlee was appointed in place ot Alderman 
Talbot. 

NOTICES OF INTENTION TO BUILD. 

Burrill & Whitney, K street, between Third 
street and Broadway; W. H. Warner, Third street, 
between C and D streets; Jonas Fitch, Friend 
street, north of Hanover street; Frame & Jordan, 
Trenton street, between Brooks and Marion streets ; 
Owen Clancy, Marginal street, oetween fJaynes 
and Orleans streets; Wm. Smith, 04 West Castle 
street; F. A. Richardson, 30 Lynde street; Webb 
& Ward, corner of H and Secord streets; W. G. 
Preston, corner of Beacon and Gloucester streets ; 
Daniel Darling, Broadway, between L and J£ 
streets; J. F. & D. J. Haines & Co., 312 Sumner 
street; Wm. Waters, Jr., Eutaw street, between 
Marion and Brooks streets; Geo. W. Chipman, 
corner of Court and Hanover streets; Dean & 
Pyne, Shirley street, between George and Dudley 
streets ; Patrick Lanergan, Third street, between E 
and F streets; John Gilbert, corner of Zeigler 
and Dearborn streets; Seth Robinson, 757 Broad- 
way. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Streets. 

VACANCIES IN CITY OFFICES. 

A communication was received from the Board 
of Assessors, announcing a vacancy in the First 
Assistant Assessors, by the death of Joseph W. 
Dudley. Read and ordered to be sent down. 

A communication was received from the School 
Committee, proposing a convention with that 
body, on Tuesday, June 8, at iy z o'clock, tor filling 
vacancies in the committee, occasioned by the 
resignation of Linus M. Child ot Ward Six, and 
Charles W. Storey of Ward Nine. The proposition 
for a convention at the time specified was con- 
curred in. 

HEARINGS ON ORDERS OF NOTICE. 

The hearings on orders of notice, on the pro- 
posed construction of a sewer in Bainbridge street 
northerly end ; on the proposed rebuilding ol the 
sewer in Orchard street, and in Eustis street, be- 
tween Oichard and Dearborn streets ; on the pro- 
posed construction of a sewer in Cabot street, be- 
tween Culvert street and Linden park, and in Ver- 
non street, between Belmont and Caliot streets, 
were severally taked up for consideration. No per- 
son appearing in either case, the reports were sev- 
erally recommitted. 

The hearing on the subject of change of name 
and numbers in East Chester nark, was taken up. 

Oliver Stevens, in behalf of the remonstrants, 
stated that ev»,ry person in that part, of Chester 
park which was affected hy the recent order was 
opposed to the change; the people have become 
accustomed to the name of the street, and there 
was no call for a change. To show this, he pro- 
posed to call a lew witnesses. 

Dr. Geo. H. Nichols stated that every gentleman 
in the street was opposed to the change. There was 
no doubt there was much confusion in relation to 
the numbers of the various portions of the streets 
and parks, designated as Chester cquarc, Chester 
park,&c; yet the people who resided there, and 



1^9 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



the backmen and others who came there, have be- 
come accustomed to tnese conflicting; numbers. 
They were so well satisfied that they asked to be 
let alone. 

There was a general opinion that this change 
would depreciate the value of the property, l>y call- 
ing it East Chester Park. In answe' - io Alderman 
James, he stated that every person had signed the 
remonstrance; every person to whom it was pre- 
sented, signed it. 

Mr. Kitcuie concurred in the statements of Dr. 
Nichols ; if all the residents had not signed the re- 
monstrance, he did not doubt they could all be 
had. 

Mr. Stevens stated that if there was any public 
necessity for this chanae, as, for instance, in oblit- 
erating the little indentations of parks, squares, 
and streets, and for calling the principal streets in 
that section ot the city by one name turough their 
entire length, no particular objection would be 
made in this case. It might come about thatTre- 
mont street would be the backbone of these 
streets, and that a numbering would be required 
which would dispense with the names of East and 
West as applied to all these streets; but these re- 
monstrants onjected to being picked out from all 
the rest. 

A motion was made to recommit the report. 

Alderman Kichards hoped this matter would be 
settled in the Board of Aldermen, and not by the 
committee. In the consideration of the fact that 
East Chester park was about to be extended across 
the South Bay, it was thought to be best to settle 
this matter at this time. In going up Washington 
street, it would naturally occur that the proper di- 
vision into the designation of east and west, as 
applied to the streets, should be from that street. 
Thatru'e was applied to all the streets except this, 
in which alone such designation commenced east of 
Harrison avenue instead ot east of Washington 
street. 

On motion of Alderman Kichards, it was voted 
that the petitioners have leave to withdraw. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Ordered, That the Committee on Laying Out and 
Widening Streets be and they hereby are author- 
ized in the settlement of damages caused by the 
extension of Broadway to purchase the estate be- 
longing to the heirs ot Edward Harney ior a sum 
not exceeding $3000, the same to be charged to the 
Broadway extension loan. 

COMMON COUNCIL PAPERS. 

The petition of Charles Faulkner tor removal of 
restrictions on sales of a lot of land on East 
Springfield street was referred in concurrence. 

The request ot the Cochituate Water Board for 
authority to contract with the city of Charlestown 
for water for East Boston war. referred to the Com- 
mittee on Water in concurrerce. 

The request for the City Council to paiticipate 
in the ceremonies of decorating graves of soldiers 
on the 30th inst. was accepted in concurrence. 

The notice of a vacancy in the office of Second 
Assistant Assessors, caused by the decease of a 
member from Ward Four, was relerred to the Com- 
mittee on the Assessors' Department. 

The ordinance to amend an ordinance relating to 
Public Buildings so that the Committee on Public 
Instruction may purchase seboolhouse sites, was 
laid on the table. 

The following orders were passed in concur- 
rence : 

Order requesting additional fire-alarm signals in 
Ward Fourteen. 

Order to authorize repairs on City Hall offices. 

Order suggesting the erection of a general armo- 
ry building. 

Order for ventilation of Superior (Criminal) 
Court room. 

The report of Committee on City Treasurer's 
Accounts was accepted, in concurrence. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Alderman Bradlee, from the Committee on Over- 
seers of the Poor, made a report as follows : 

The Committee on Overseers of the Poor, to 
whom was referred the report of the Committee 
on Armories, with an order authorizing the Com- 
mittee on Public Buildings to procure plans and 
estimates for a building to be erected on the lot of 
land belonging to the city, on Bowker street, to 
contain accommodations for Company A, Fiist 
Battalion of Cavalry, having considered the sub- 
ject, make the following report: 



The boilers used in heating the Charity Build- 
ings were now in the basement of the Temporary 
Home, and great inconveniences and injury result 
therefrom, as is particularly described in a com- 
munication from the Overseers of the Poor. 

The committee think that the request of the 
Board contained in said communication is reason- 
able and just, and that the balance ot the land, 
originally purchased for the Charity liuilding 
should be reserved and set apart for a boiler house 
and coal shed and such other purposes connected 
with the Bureau as may hereafter he found desira- 
ble. A one story building-, with French roof, 
would furnish all the accommodations at present 
required, which would be much more advantage- 
ous for the institution, as regards lighT: and air, 
than a high structure such as proposed by the 
order under consideration. 

Experience has proved fiat many of our public 
institutions need enlarging to meet the growing: 
wants of the city, and the first steps have already 
been taken looking to thecection of new build- 
ings for the Public Library and for a Hospital for 
the Insane. This shows us that having the control 
of land adjoining any of our institutions, it should 
he the policy of the city to reserve a sufficient area 
to keep pace with our advancement and growth. 

In the case at present under consideration, there 
is an urgent need of the larser portion of the un- 
occupied land for immediate use, and of the entire 
lot in the not far distant future. With these 
views, the committee submit that the order ought 
not to pass, as it would be prejudice 1 to the best 
interests of the Charity Bureau aud Temporary 
Home. 

They recommend the passage of the accompany- 
ing order as a substitute therefor: 

Ordered, That the Committee on Public Build- 
ings, in consultation with the Board of Overseers 
ot the Poor, be requested to procure plans and es- 
timates for a boiler house and coal sheds to be lo- 
cated on the lot of land adjoining the Central 
Charity Bureau and Temporary Home on Bowker 
street, and report the same to the City Council. 

Alderman Baldwin said he had been ot the opin- 
ion that the Charity Bureau was a great humbug, 
and he now fully believed it. On his motion the 
petition of the National Lancers was read, and the 
petition m aid of their request for a new armory 
was also read, signed by F. W. Lincoln, Jr., Jor- 
dan, Marsh & Co., and many others. 

Alderman Baldwin moved a reference of the or- 
der and petitions relative to a new armory to the 
Committee on Public Buildings, with the same in- 
structions as g:iven previously, 

Alderman Bradlee wished to know the intent of 
the gentleman, and hoped that a vote would first 
be taken on the Committee's report. If the ac- 
ceptance of that report was retused,then the ques- 
tion would stand just as it did before. H e hoped 
the question would be met squarely. 

Alderman Baldwin withdrew his motion, and 
said his object was simply to take the matter from 
the Committee on Overseers of the Poor, in whose 
hands the matter had been manipulated so that 
the claims ot the National Lancers were entirely 
disregarded. He believed the needs of the Lan- 
cers and the best interests of the city required a 
better armory for that Company, and it was his 
opinion that the lot of land adjoining the build- 
ings of the Public Charities was the most suitable 
place far such an armory. 

Alderman Seaver said if the object was the as- 
sistance of the poor, he was in favor of the ac- 
ceptance of the report. There was such a routine 
in getting assistance from the Overseers of the 
Poor that parties weie in danger of starving be- 
fore relief could be obtained. If it were not for 
the Provident Association, a large number of poor 
would suffer greatly. The first question which 
was asked was who was their grandmother, and 
whether they had a settlement, and if they could 
not show that they had a settlement they could 
not get any relief. 

Alderman Baldwin said the gentleman on his 
right (Alderman Seaver) had expressed his views 
in relation to the assistance of the poor, and he 
had heard from many persons, members of the 
City Government and others, great objections in 
relation to the red tape which must be gone 
through in obtaining relief. Accordingly, he had 
no objection to having it go upon record as the ex- 
pression of his opinion that the Charity Bureau 
was a great humbug. 

Alderman Bradiee, in reply to the charges of red 



MAY 3 4, 1869 



130 



tape, said if there was any blame in the matter of 
relief to the poor, it was the statute and not the 
institutions which must bear it. The law requires 
these inquiries to be made in relation to settle- 
ment. The Overseers of the Poor were ot the 
opinion that this lot of land would be necessary 
for their uses, and it -ad be«n *»nnd that the boil- 
ers made the morris ;oo hot where they now are, 
much to the discomfort of the sick who are in the 
Temporary Home. 

Alaeruian tticbards differed entirely as to the ne- 
cessity ot this lot of land for the uses of the Chari- 
ty Bureau, or to providing for the sick there. 
Tnere might now and then be a sick person there, 
but itwould be Lut temporarily, for hosp'tals were 
provided for that class. 

Alderman Talbot said he perhaps would have 
been willing to yield to the overseers if they had 
waited a little while before asking for another 
building. But a year ago they declared themselves 
satisfied with their accommodations in the new 
structure, and he could not see a necessity for an 
enlargement of their room so soon. 

Alderman Seaver further eonttnded that the 
passage ot the order of this committee would not 
meet the case of the deserving poor. It was these 
very cases, of those who had no settlement, for 
which provision was needed. They ought to be 
relieved, and Boston was ready to pay for it. 

Alderman Bradlee said be knew nothing of any 
manipulation of this matter in the committee, as 
had been alleged. So far as the committee were 
concerned, the question of an armory for the 
Lancers was rot considered, and was not properly 
before them. The question was as to the need of 
the buildings for the Bureau of Charities. That it 
was a humbug to feed the poor, he could not agree 
to. All persons were liable to error, and it was 
not strange that mistakes should be made in erect- 
ing that building, as there had been in tbis City 
Hall. They had learned by actual experience that 
it was necessary to remove the boilers from their 
present position. They had injured the building, 
kept the rooms too hot, and spoiled the groceries 
which were kept there. They should therefore be 
taken from their present location and placed in 
another building. 

It had been suggested that a boiler room and 
engine house might be in the lower story, and 
that an armory might be built above it. That was 
considered objectionable, from the fact that it 
would be the best policy to have a building of but 
one story, so that the light and air of the Belief 
Building should not be obstructed. There might 
be objections, too, on account of the noise neces- 
sarily connected with an armory, and with the 
dances and other late parties, which would affect 
the comfort ot those who might be inmates of the 
Home. 

Alderman Pratt was of opinion that this matter 
had become a little mixed. He objected to reflec- 
tions by one committee upon another. If this 
Board was to pursue such a course, he should dep- 
recate it. As far as organized charities were con- 
cerned, he had no faith in them. They were cold- 
hearted, but they were the best which we could 
have in the present state of society. He did not 
know much about this building, and thought it 
would be best to delay action, that the members of 
the Board might have an opportunity to examine 
the premises. 

On motion of Alderman Pratt, the subject was 
laid on the table. 

Alderman James, from the Committee on Pav- 
ing, reported leave to withdraw on petition of Mash, 
Spaulding & Co. and others, to lay an iron pipe 
under Broad street from their store to Arch wharf. 
Accepted. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on 
Streets, reported no action necessary on sundry 
notices of intention to build. Accepted. 

Alderman Talbot also reported leave to with- 
draw on the petition of the Boston Car Spring Co., 
for a right of way across the Boston & Providence 
Railroad, at Pynchon street; also on petition of D. 
G. Haskins, for the acceptance of Maywood street ; 
of Calvin B. Faunce and others, for the watering of 
Pynchon street; and of Martin Lennon, to be paid 
for land taken for the widening of Albany street 
Severally accepted. 

Alderman White, from the Committee on Li- 
censes, reported in favor of licensing two news- 
boys ; of a license to Francis Banks to give a spar- 
ring exhibition at 119 Haverhill street, and of John 



B. Bailey for a similar exhibition in the same 
place. Severally accepted. 

Alderman White, from the Committee on 
Health, reported in favor of granting the petition 
of John Quinn, to build a stable for more than four 
horses on Broadway, between lv and L streets, and 
leave to withdraw to Solomon S. Gray and others, 
remonstrants against the same. Accepted. 

Alderman Seaver, from the Committee on Mar- 
kets, reported leave to withdraw on the petition of 
the Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic Associa- 
tion, for leave to construct a temporary building 
for the use of their exhibition, on South Market 
street. Accepted. 

Alderman James, from the joint standing Com- 
mittee on Public Lvnds, made a report in which 
they respectfully represent that an order was 
passed by the City Council and approved by his 
Honor the Mayor, April 2, 1869, granting the use of 
the lot of land belonging to the city on Dartmouth 
street and St. James avenue to the directors of the 
proposed Musical Festival for the erection ot a 
building thereon, in which to hold said festival. 
As the land could not be used until it was graded 
up, and immediate attention being required In 
having it done, the Committee directed the Super- 
intendent of Public Lands to proceed forthwith 
and place the same in a condition satisfactory to 
the committee having in charge the erection of 
said building. 

The Common Council having on the first day of 
April adjourned for two weeks, the committee 
were prevented from asking tor an appropriation 
as requested by the seventeenth section of the 
joint rules and orders of the City Council, and 
therefore were obliged to wait until the work had 
been completed. Believing that then* action will 
meet with the approval of the City Council, they 
recommend the passage of this accompanying or- 
der. 

Ordered, That the Treasurer be and is hereby 
authorized to pay to Martin Hayes & Co., the 
sum of $1436 36, it being for work done upon the 
lot of land belonging to the city on Dartmouth 
street and St. James avenue, known as St. James 
park, the said amouut to be charged to the appro- 
priation for Public Lands. 

The order was read twice and passed. 

Alderman White, from the Joint Standing Com- 
mittee on Public Instruction, to whom was re- 
terred the request ot the School Committee, that 
the lot of land owned by the city on the corner of 
Berkeley and Newbury streets be reserved for 
school purposes, having considered the subject, 
report that in their opinion it would be inexpedi- 
ent to reserve the lot for school purposes. As the 
Committee on Public Lands were directed by an 
order of the City Council passed July 2, 1866, not 
to sell the land until otherwise ordered, the pass- 
age of the accompanying order is respectfully 
recommended: 

Ordered, That the Committee on Public Lands be 
authorized to sell the lot ot land owned by the city 
3ii the corner of Berkeley and Newbury streets, 
whenever they shall deem best for the city's inter- 
est. 

The order was read twice and passed. 

Alderman White, from the same committee, 
who were requested to ascertain whether any ad- 
ditional appropriation was required to provide for 
the conveyance of pupils attending the public 
schools from certain sections of the city, having 
carefully considered the subject, submit the fol- 
lowing report: 

It appears from a communication sent to the 
City Council by the School Committee, in February 
last, that for several years past the pupils in the 
Latin, English High, and Girls' High and Normal 
Schools residing in East Boston have been allowed 
to pass over the ferries for the nominal sum of 
two dollars per annum. . 

On the 1st of January, 1869, this privilege was 
withdrawn, and lull fare demanded. The School 
Committee, therefore, requested the City Council 
to make arrangemeuts for the conveyance across 
the ferries of pupils attending those schools, free 
of charge. When this communication was re- 
ceived, the city had no authority to expend money 
for the purpose ; but an act has recently been 
passed by the Legislature authorizing cities and 
towns to appropriate money to be expended by 
the School Committee, in their discretion, in pro- 
viding for the conveyance of pupils to and from 
the public schools. 



J 31 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



As the appropriation for school purposes during 
the present year does not contain any specific 
provision for furnishing free conveyance to pupils, 
it is necessary that the City Council should au- 
thorize the School Committee to expend from their 
appropriation for incidentals in furnishing a free 
passage across the ferries. The committee would 
therelore respeettuliy recommend the passage of 
the accompanying order. 

Ordered, That the School Committee he author- 
ized to furnish tickets for a iree passage over the 
East Boston ferries to such of the pupils from 
Ward One, attending the Latin, English High and 
Girls' High aud Normal schools as may require 
them, the expense to be charged to the appropria- 
tion heretofore made lor Grammar Schools, School 
Committee. 
'Ihe order was lead twice and passed. 
Alderman Talhot, from the Committee on Lay- 
ing-out and Widening Streets, to whom were com- 
mitted the accompanying communication and re- 
port, with instructions to estimate the expense ot 
the proposed widening of Devonshire street, op- 
posite the new Post Office site, reported that they 
uad given the subject their consideration and weie 
of opinion that the expense of the said widening 
will not be less than $75,000. 
The report was accepted. 

The question recurring upon the previous report 
of the committee, leave to withdraw on petition of 
Wm. L. Burt, for the widening of Devonshire 
street, the report was accepted, by a vote of 9 to 
3, as follows: 

Yeas— Baldwin, Bradlee, Fairbanks, Hawes, 
Pratt, Seaver, Talbot, White, Van Nostrand. 
ftays— James, Rice, Richards. 

OEDEES OF NOTICE. 

On the petit'on of the Metropolitan Railroad Co. 
for location of track on Harrison avenue, from 
Dover street, to connect with their track on Eustis 
street. Hepring Monday, June 14, 4 P. M. 

On the proposed widening of Eliot street, to Wm. 
Holmes and the heirs of Jonathan Patten. Hear- 
ing Tuesday, June 8, 4 P. M. 

On the notice of intention to build on the Brom- 
field House estate, of a proposed widening. Hear- 
ing Tuesday, June 8, 4 P. M. 

Un the proposed construction of a sewer in Pur- 
chase street, from Congress to Federal street. 
Hearing Monday next, May 31, 4 P. M. 

On the petition ot the Bay State Brick Co. for 
leave to build a stable on Stanhope street. Hear- 
ing Monday next, 4 P. M, 

On the petition of the Provident Institution for 
Savings and others, against the change of name of 
Temple place. Hearing Monday next, 4 P. M. 

OEDEES PASSED. 

On motion of Alderman Pratt, 

Ordered, That the Superintendent, under the di- 
rection of the Committee on Lamps, be and he is 
hereby authorized to expend not exceeding $2500 
for the purpose of lighting the streets in the im- 
mediate vicinity of the St. James Park during the 
continuance of the proposed Peace Jubilee, the 
expense to be chargfed to the appropriation for the 
Lamp Department. 

On motion of Alderman James, 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be 
directed to build such plank walks and fences and 
do such grading upon the streets around and in 
the vicinity of the Coliseum as in the opinion of 
toe Committee on Paving the public safety and 
convenience may require. 

On motion of Alderman Fairbanks, 

Ordered, That the sum of $21 26 assessed upon 
Joel S. Gilman for a sewer in London street, be 
and is hereby ahated. 

On motion of Alderman Talbot, 



Ordered, That there be paid to James Power and 
Patrick H. Powers $321, tor 321 feet of land taken 
from a person or persons unknown (a portion of a 
common passage-way), taken by the widening of 
Federal street under resolve ot June 6, 18C8, and 
to be charged to the Federal street loan. 

Ordered, That there be paid to James Power and 
Patrick H. Powers $2108 70 lor land taken and dam- 
ages occasioned by the widening of federal street, 
under resolve of June 0, 1868, the said land having 
been taken in the name of Samuel A. Way. 

Ordered, That the safety and convenience of the 
city require that Rockvilie place should be laid 
out, and that land belonging; to the city be taken, 
comer of Kockville place and Warren street, tlie 
laying out being at no expense. 
On motion of Alderman White, 
Ordered, That the wnges of employes of the 
Health Department, with the exception of me- 
chanics and foremen ot yards, he increased at an 
average of four dollars per mouth, said increase 
amounting to the sum of seventeen thousand dol- 
lars per annum. 

Order passed for the abatement of a nuisance on 
Cambridge street and Lawrence place. 
On motion of Alderman James, 
Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be 
authorized to remove the trees which obstruct the 
sidewalk on Monmouth street, near the corner of 
Brooks street. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be 
directed to grade Vernon street, from Cabot 
street to Iremont street, with ashes, at an esti- 
mated cost of $5000. 

Ordered, That the Board establish the revised 
grade of Grove Hall avenue, as shown on plans 
and profiles made hy the City Surveyor, dated May 
1, 1869, approved by the Committee on Paving, 
and deposited in the office of the said City Survey- 
or. 

Ordered, That the Chief of Police be directed to 
notify the owners and abutters on Eutaw st'eet, 
between Meridian and Brooks streets, to furnish 
edgestones for sidewalks and lay their sidewalks 
with brick. 

Ordered, That the Chief of Police be directed to 
notify the owners and abutters on Parker street, 
between Tremont and Heath streets, to furnish 
edgestones to support the sidewalk. 

Ordered, That the Chief of Police be directed to 
notify the owners and abutters on Everett street, 
to lay their sidewalks with brick. 

Orders were read once, for the repaving of Court 
street with the Stafford pavement, from Court 
square to Washington street, at an expense of 
$3500; to repave South street with small granite 
blocks, from Beach street to Kneeland street, at a 
cost of $2000 ; to repave Milk street, from Congress 
to Pearl streets, at a cost of $2500; to repave Har- 
rison avenue, from Dedham to Plympton streets, 
at a cost of $1500; also an order to change the re ■ 
maining fire alarm signal boxes for the automatic 
boxes, at an expense of $300. 

AUDITOE OF ACCOUNTS. 

Alfred T. Turner was elected Auditor of Accounts 
by an unanimous vote. 

On motion of Alderman Rice, 

Ordered, That a message be senc to the Common 
Council, proposing a Convention of both branches 
of the City Council on Thursday next, the 27th 
inst., at 8 o'clock P. M., for the purpose of choos- 
ing a City Treasurer tor the financial year. 

Alderman Van Nostrand moved to reconsider 
the rejection of the order allowing and paying 
$3000 to the Trustees of the Roxbury Latin School, 
which motion prevailed, and the report and order 
were then laid on the table. 

On motion of Alderman Hawes, it was voted to 
visit the Charity Building on Tuesday. 

Adjourned to Thursday evening at 8 o'clock. 






132 



COMMON COUNCIL 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 

MAY 27, 1869. 



An adjourned meeting of the Board of Alder- 
men was held this evening at 8 o'clock, Mayor 
ShurtlefT presiding. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED ASD REFERRED. 

Elmira Rollins, that the betterment assessed on 
hei estates, N os. 25 and 27 High street, be appor- 
tioned into three parts. 

Heirs of Joseph H. Thayer, that the betterment 
assessed upon their estate on Avon place be ap- 
portioned into three parts. 

Severally referred to the Committse on Streets. 

Stevenson & Pierson and others, that Kilby 
street be repaved. from State io Water streets, 
with wooden pavement, or squire blocks. Refer- 
red to the Committee on Paving. 

Thomas Richardson, against the city's acqusition 
of any easement over his property, at the foot of 
Summer street, by reason of the continuance of 
any drain or sewer through the same. Placed on 
flle. 

Solomon I?, and Mary M. Morse, to be compen- 
sated tor personal injuries sustained by said Mary 
M. from a tall on the icy sidewalk of Webster 
street. Referred to the Committee on Claims. 

Jairus Pratt and others, to be compensated for 
damages to their estates by reason of the change 
of grade on Eutaw street, some years since. Re- 
ierred to the Committee on Claims. 

A request ot the School Committee for the erec- 
tion of a primary schoolhouse on the lot purchas- 
ed for that purpose on Appleton street, was refer- 
red to the Committee on Public Instruction. 

A request of the School Committee that addi- 
tional school accommodations be provided in the 
Phillips street primary schoolhouse, Highlands, 
was referred to the Committee on Public Instruc- 
tion. 

An invitation from Post No. 26, G. A. R., to par- 
ticipate in the decoration ceremonies on the 27th 
inst. was accepted. 

SPECIAL ASSIGNMENT. 

A notice was received from the Common Coun- 
cil, of a concurrence in a proposition for a conven- 
tion tor the election of a City" Treasurer. 

The Board went into convention witn the Com- 
mon Council, and shortly afterwards returned. 
[See proceedings of Common Council.] 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

The following orders were passed : 

Ordered, Ihat the Committee on Fire Alarms be 
authorized to change the remaining crank signal 
boxes, titty-eight in number, to the automatic 
boxes, the expense, not exceeding $3300, to be 
charged to the appropriation for lire alarms. 

Ordered, that the Superintendent of Streets be 
authorized to repave Harrison avenue, between 
Dedham and Plyinpton streets, at an estimated 
cost of $1500. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets 
be authorized to repave South street, trom Beach 
street to Kneeland street, with small granite 
blocks, at an estimated cost of $2000. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be 
authorized to pave Court street, from Court square 
to Washington street, with the Stafford Wooden 
Pavement, at an estimated cost of $3500. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be 
authorized to repave Milk street, between Pearl 
and Congress streets, witn small granite blocks, at 
an estimated cost of $2500. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Alderman James, from the Committee on Com- 
mon, reported leave to withdraw on the petition 
of J. C. Goodwin and others, that the parade 
ground on Boston Common be rolled and put in 
order for a play ground. Accepted. 

Alderman White, from the Committee on Licen- 
ses, reported in favor of a license to Wm. Blaikie, 
to give a dramatic entertainment in Horticultural 
Hall, Mav 29th. Accepted. 



Alderman James, from the Committee on Pav- 
ing, offered the following orders, which were 
passed: 

Ordered, That the Chief-of-Police be directed to 
notify Solon W. Dewey, owner of estate on Kenil- 
worth street, to furnish new edgestones and lay 
his sidewalk. 

Ordered, That the Chief-of-Police be directed to 
notify the owners and abutters on Meridian street 
between Eutaw and Wnite streets, Eutaw street 
between Meridian and Brooks streets, Monmouth 
street between Meridian and Brooks streets, White 
street between Meridian and Brooks streets, and 
Brook 5 street between Saratoga and Condor 
streets, to furnish new edgestones and lay their 
sidewalks. 

On motion of Alderman Richards, the vote that 
the Committee on Public Buildings be directed to 
ventilate the Superior Criminal Court room, was 
reconsidered, and the subject was referred to the 
Committee on Public Buildings on the part of the 
Board. 

On motion of Alderman Rtadlee, the vote refer- 
ring to a joint special committee the petition 
of J. & W. R. Cavanagh, was reconsidered, and 
said petition was leferred to a special committee 
of the Board, consisting of Alderman liradlee, 
Hawes and Van Nostrand. 

Alderman White, from the Committee on Linen- 
ces, reported rules and orders for the government 
and regulation of hackney carriages, omnibuses, 
trucks, wagons and other vehicles. Read once. 

Adjourned. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 

MAY 27, 1869. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Common 
Council was held this evening at 8 o'clock, the 
President, Wm. G. Harris, in the chair. 

PAPERS FROM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

A message proposing a Convention for choice ot 
City Treasurer, at 8 o'clock this evening, was con- 
curred in, and notice of concurrence was ordered 
to be sent to the Board of Aldermen. 

ELECTION OF CITY TREASURER. 

The Board of Aldermen came in, for a conven- 
tion of the two branches, when they proceeded to 
the business of the convention in the election of a 
City Treasurer. 

Alderman Van Nostrand, and Messrs. Tucker of 
Ward Six and Snow of Ward Eleven were appoint- 
ed a Committee to receive, sort and count the 
votes. 

The Committee reported as follows: 

Whole number of votes 55 

Necessary to a choice 28 

Frederick U.Tracy 53 

A. It. Holden 1, blank 1 2 

Mr. Tracy was declared elected. 

The business of the convention being concluded, 
the Board of Aldermen withdrew. 

The petitions of teachers in the Lawrence School, 
for the sprinkling of the streets adjacent to that 
schoolhouse, of J. Pratt and others, in relation 
to change of grade of Eutaw street, and of Solo- 
mon B. and of Mary M. Morse, were referred in 
concurrence. 

The reference to the Committee on the Assessors' 
Department of the communic ition from Board of 
Assessors announcing the death of A. P. Rollins, 
a Second Assistant Assessor, was concurred in. 

The notice ota vacancyin the Board of Assessors, 
caused by the death of Joseph W. Dudley, a Fiist 
Assistant Assessor, was referred to the Committee 
on the Assessors' Department. 

Tne requests of the School Committee, for the 
erection of a primary schoolhouse on lot in Ap- 
pleton street, and for further school accommoda- 
tions in the Phillips primary schoolhouse, were 
referred in concurrence. 

An invitation of Post 26, G. A. R. to participate 
in decoration ceremonies, was accepted and 
placed on flle. 

The following orders were each read once : 

Order authorizing the payment of $1436 63 to 
Martin Hayes & Co., for work done on St. James 
park. 




8 6 9 



133 



nL f !f rS W ?, Te P assed > as follows: 
ages on account of the extTn K Kdwfv "" 

Whole number of vot^s.. .„ 

.Necessary to a choice ' E 

Allred r. Turner ,« 25 

w - T'apy, Thomas Keyes',' Jr.; John ' J 
Oalliran, one each.... 3 

Mr. Turner was declared elected, in concurrence. 

Tho .„„ UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

andpa^edT 1116 0riJerS wer e read a second time 

Order authorizing repair of Police Station Nn 7 
at an estimated cost of #1000 station JVo. 7, 

Keport and order authorizing one of the bells not 

street" andihe 6 ^T* ° D the City 8table - A1 bany 
nlnrme ?? „ e "jcessary apparatus for givine 

arn^L ,nCaSeot firet0 be connected therewith 
at an expense not exceeding $600. "^rewun, 

ureter to furnish the Drake Primarv SpVw.^i 

kj sssssss? 8e ™° - e ™ sl " s 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

gK£ffi^ s S wS 

berPd ° f ? lh0 " s ? s ^ watered ha^gcfrefuUy con! 
SKS. recommended g t he passage™ 

inSb^^fe* ^ Committee on Public Build- 
seflral mwKm r° Lave , the **"**» around the 
SSffi. buildings and schoolhouses watered 

Sft^asa,isEs?sug3s. Buu< "' B8 ' "" 

Kead twice and passed. 

directedro^^S* 116 S . ame committee, who were 
of IwtinS. o « 8ld » and report on tne expediency 
triPt ^» - ff a new Po'ice Station in the Sixth Dis- 
|ortedthK^ falIy considered the subject, rt 
ent at iirSU? , lr °P ,m on it would be inexpedi- 
low oSf Pd pLT Ct , a ne w building, as the house 
Cnish ai P ?hp C nP„ be altere d.aud enlarged so as to 
™ ' a'. 1 th e accommoaations required. Unon 
find that tVT With lh , e officers of the q Di 9 tr ct, they 
as thP nr..^ e - present Nation is the most desirable, 

i ? s done P f n i C f^ par ^- ^ the bu siness of the station 
is aone in its immediate vicinity. 

exnen^n?!™ 1 " 66 n it ve obtained estimates of the 
thffi«S lt ? u,R the P res ent building, and find 
Mat it can be done at an estimated cost of $13,000. 



t r hSo°w^foSr reCOmmend the P assa * e of 

i™ la L ered ' Xhat the Committee on Public Build 
««W autlaoriz ed to alter and enlarge Police «£ 

toe n Au°di 6 t;,? t ft , ? , A e8tlmated cost of ® W and that 
safd a^mounr fn, CC t°, Un t tS De au Morized to transfer 
fund. f0r tuat P ur Pose from the reserved 

'£ he order was read once. 
FinwP^w * Ward Six > from th e Committee on 
evS^ilfR was r ? fe , lred tue P etition of the 
hnnrta k a u R8 .? anks ot tu is city, that registered 

bond" m a d S pn S rp tUte , d f0r C,t - V of Boston Coupon 
>>oncis, made a report recommending the nassao-p 
of the accompanying order- B passage 

Ordered, That the City Treasurer be herel.v an 
thonzed to issue, in such torm and manner af Si 
Committee on Finance may direct Stored cer 

111 excuange for and in lieu of any coupon cerrifi 

"nder V aut C hm h , a rn f been H ° r may *«&*&* issued 
S authonty of orders of the City Council aud 

inexcha'n^ann^, ate tb - e .^neate^ To^eceived 

Accoun anS th and . depOSlt \ hem Wlth th e Auaitor of 

office Th«PprHfip y , ma ? rbe placed on flle in his 
omce. ihe certificates issued n accordance with 

2?; SInns of this order shall be signed by tlie 

Chi m ^ aSUr + er M and T ^ ud,tor ot ' Accounts. y 
word^canpp, . 1 Mr - Ke i th of Ward Fifteen, the 
whpn t?,l ce \ was substitutea for "mutilate," 
passed ° lder WaS read a second time and 

Mr. Osborn, from the same committee renori-Prt 
that to better enable them to negotiate f 'the loans 
whicn have been authorized by the City Council 
inforders*! "J* *" the PaSSage 0t ^e accompany-' 

Ordered, That the committee on Finance be and 
ab e y adv SSSS? a ^ riz ^ «*» consolidate the loans 
ueStPd w med - ° y the Cit y Council, but not 
negotiated, for various street improvements- also 

tnlc°i a v S C f W ; h n iC,1 i < may K l,ereattei - be aSthSdby 
the City Council for the same purpose the Drespnr 

municipal year, into one loan, to an amount not 

"Con^oHf n t% 5?' 000 ;f° be styll?d and caded the 
consolidated Stieet improvement Loan." 

«S2Wn P a i all > the betterments and the rev- 
enue of all kinds derived from the various im- 

Cl e f f° T r wh ^ h this "Consolidated Street 
Improvement Loan" is made, shall form a special 
fund tn S hp Dd for tbe redemption of the same. Said 
man\£?S,JY eSted , by the0lty Tre asurer in such 
m, ?i?p w , d x ? such , securities as the Committee 
hPin^ ^»n U f Ctl0n + 0f the City Debt, for the time 
being, shall from time to time direct. 

n. ip a 6 £1 „ erS 7 er % Passed, under suspension of the 

rules, by a vote of 44 yeas, nays none. 

de ^nes ame Committee reported the following or- 

._?JS ¥**£ the Trea surer be, and he hereby is 
K® 4 to borrow, under the direction of the 
nnr mm , • e on - ^ lnan ce, a sum not exceeding $3,- 
000,000, in anticipation of the income of the pres- 
ent financial year, and that all money obtained un- 
S.% 1 ,"?? bpmade payable on or before the 
30th day of April, 1870, the close of the financial 

The order was read once. 
nnh'iZH, / Ward 0ne Presented an invitation 
S££J£ altot the owners of steamer Massasoit to 
visit that steamer on Saturday next at 2^ o'clock, 
^f an excursion m the harbor. Kead and placed 

On motion of Mr. Batchelder of Ward Four an 
oraer was read twice and passed frr the payment 
ot certain bills of members of the City Govern- 
ment. Adjourned. 



134 



BOAKD OF ALDERMEN 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 
MAY 31, 1869. 



'the regular weekly meeting of the Board of Al- 
dermen was held this afternoon, at four o'clock 
Mayor Shurtleff presiding. 

APPOINTMENTS MADE ASD CONFIRMED. 

Measurer of Wood. Wm. B. Harding, 

Members of Fire Department. Perley M. Marble, 

Hose Co. .No. 4; Irving W. Campbell, Hose No. 6; 

Louis VV. Fluet, Hose No. 10; L. M. Clifford, Hook 

and Ladder Co. No. 3; John G. Duffy, Kngine 

No. 4. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

John Kuhn, for leave to remove a tree from 
Mount rieasant avenup, corner of Forest street. 

N. J. Bradlee ana others, that stone steps be 
substituted for the wooden ones on passage way 
from Brookline street to Pembroke street. 

Mrs. Hodge, lor abatement of an assessment on 
estate ot John A. Hodge for sidewalk in Lexing- 
ton street. 

John L. Hunnewell anl others, that the gutters 
be paved from 38 to 48 Marion street, East Boston. 

M. J. Ryder and others, that O street, from sec- 
ond street to Fifth street, be paved. 

(Severally referred to the Committee on Paving. 

Tiiomas 1$. Williams, to he paid for damages oc- 
casioned to his estate by change ot line on Tremont 
street, at the corner ot Lagrange street. 

Walter S. Robinson and others, that West Rut- 
land street be accepted. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Streets, 

Sarah Nicks, to be compensated lor personal in- 
juries rece'vert in Kennard avenue. 

Joseph Azarian, to be paid for damages done to 
his property by an alleged obstruction on the high- 
way ot Beacon street. 

Severally referred to Committee on Claims. 

A. M . Stetson & Co. and others, that a steam fire 
engine be located between C and E streets, near 
First or Second streets. Referred to Committee 
on Fire Department. 

Cook, Jordan & Morse, that a portion of flats in 
the South Bay be dredged out. Referred to Com- 
mittee on the Harbor. 

Ivory Harmon and others, that a sewer be laid 
in Perrin and Moreland streets, to Grove Hall ave- 
nue, lieferred to the Committee on Sewers. 

Terence McAuliffe, for leave to give an exhibition 
of sparring at 119 Haverhill street. 

Dexter & Meeker, for leave to exhibit statuary 
on Back Bay lands. 

Severally referred to Committee on Licenses, 

S. U. Cheever, that a nuisance on Sbawmuc ave- 
nue, near Madison street, he removed hy the con- 
struction of a sewer. Referred to the Committee 
on Health. 

Assignees of Charles W. Griffeths, for abatement 
of tax. Referred to Committee on Assessors' De- 
partment. 

John Ritchie and others, that one uniform name 
be given to East Chester Park, Chester square, and 
West Chester Park, with a request for a hearing 
before the lull Board and not before a committee. 

Jordan, Marsh & Co. and others, in aid of the 
above, on account of the constant annoyance and 
difficulty in sending goods to tae dwellings in 
those streets. 

Alderman Richards stated that remonstrances 
were to be presented against these petitions, and 
ten persons had signed the petition under a mis- 
apprehension. He moved that the parties have a 
hearing two weeks from tuday. 

Aldermau Baldwin suggested the next meeting, 
to which it was replied that as the remonstrance 
could not oe presented until that meeting, it could 
not be expected that the parties would have a 
sufficient notice. 
The motion for a hearing June 14 was carried. 

NOTICES OF INTENTION TO BUILD. 

Otis Wentworth, Bowker street; Julius Hincke, 
60 Kingston street; Henry Bailey, Maverick street, 
between Cottage and Lamson streets; Henry Coy, 



Norfolk street, near Lambert avenue; James Te- 
van, Lenox street, between Shawmut avenue and 
Tremont street; George Lewis, corner of High- 
land and Lambert streets; J. F. & D. J. Haines & 
Co. ,Chelsea street, near Decatur street; J. Scherer, 
Kendall street; J. A. Bell, Sixth street, between 
E and F streets; Barney Doherty, Hamburg street; 
A. & J. McLaren, 4 and 6 tiutaw street; John W. 
Odiorne, Trenton street, between Marion and 
Brooks streets; Julius Hmcke, 4 Lincoln street; 
James McNiel, Columbus avenue, between Claren- 
don ard Dartmouth streets; Michael Mulore, 
Chadwick street; J. D. Western, Forest street, 
between ITount Pleasant avenue and Vine street; 
"William Morse, Warren street, opposite Zeigler 
street; Richards & Park, Tremcnt street, corner 
of Berkeley street, and at 370 Tremont street; 
Samuel Rice, corner of Pleasant and South Cedar 
streets ; E. J. Davenport, Eighth street. Several- 
ly referred to the Committee on Streets. 

HEARINGS ON ORDERS OF NOTICE. 

The hearings on the proposed laying out of Hum- 
phrey place, from Hamilton street to Broad street; 
on the pre posed laying out of Pearl place, and its 
extension from Pearl street to Oliver street ; on 
the proposed widening of Bedford street, at the 
corner ot Kingston street; on the proposed con- 
struction of a sewer in Purchase street, from Con- 
gress street to Federal street ; and on the petition 
of the Bay State Brick Co., for leave to build a sta- 
ble on Stanhope street for more than four horses, 
were severally taken up. JNo person appearing in 
either case, the reports were severally recom- 
mitted. 

The order of notice on remonstrance ot owners 
and tenants on what was recently i'emple piace, 
against the change of name of that place to Avon 
street, was taken up by assignment. 

G. S. Hillard, for the remonstrants, called several 
of the parties in interest. After stating that this 
was something more than a matter ot taste and 
feeling, that a great change had taken place in the 
street, by fitting up the residences as shops, and a 
great expense had been incurred in advertising, 
the tenants and their customers having become 
familiar with the name of the piace, he said he 
would ask these parties to state their reasons 
against the change. 

Mr. Peter Wainwright, Treasurer of the Provi- 
dent Institution for Savings, stated that books had 
been issued to 30,000 or 40,000 names, many of 
which had gone to the country. By the change it 
would be difficult for many of the persons to 
find the institution, and subject them to great 
inconvenience and expense. The hooks were 
often brought by the agents of parties, and a few 
days since one came from California. A very large 
number reside out of the city, and in all parts of 
the country. It was a matter the managers of the 
Institution did not care about themselves, but only 
for the interests of depositors. 

In answer to questions from several Aldermen, 
he stated that it was true the men entered the 
bank from Winter place, he did not knowthatany 
one ever failed to find where the bank was, and 
that the bank removed hence from Tremont street 
some thirteen years since. Many of the depositors 
were ignorant, and it would be difficult for them 
to get accustomed to the name of a new street. 

Thomas C. Amory had no question that it would 
be much to the advantage of owners, tenants and 
others to have the name restored, a name well 
known so long in this city and out of it. 

In answer to Alderman Talbot, he did not think 
there would be the same difficulty arising from 
similarity of names ot Temple place and Temple 
street as there would be in the names of Chester 
park and Chester street, as had been spoken of. 

Thomas E. Chickering said he had no interest in 
the matter, exeept as to general objection to 
changing names of streets. When the cliange was 
made, being about to purchase a piece of property, 
he gave up the purchase on account of such change. 
He should consider it a great loss to business on 
that street with a change of name. 

In answer to Alderman Talbot whether he be- 
lieved any disadvantages had arisen from com- 
bining the several streets now comprising Wash- 
ington street, he thought not; but did not look 
upon this as strictly a continuous street across 
Washington street. 

Dr. R. Greene stated that he went into Temple 
place about the time it was cut through, and made 
no objection to a change of name at that time. 



MAY 3 1, 1869 



135 



After being changed to Autumn street, and then 
changed back to Temple place, the owners and 
occupants felt that they were entitled to retain 
the old name. They hesitated lor a time about 
advertising, and then, believing the matter was set- 
tled, advertised extensively. He had advertised 
to the amount of $ 15,000, and under a change of 
name -should consider that amount to be entirely 
lost. Some of his letters still went to Bronifield 
street ,whence he removed fifteen yeats ago. There 
was no difficulty in his mind in retaining the name 
of "place" after a street was cut through, and he 
could see no necessity for a change. The difficulty 
from a change was much greater in a business street 
than in a street for dwelling houses. 

Mr. Cusuman (Cusbman & Brooks) stated that 
he had paid a great deal of money for advertising, 
there being an advantage in the street being short, 
and it would be a great loss to himself and to 
others should the change be adhered to. 

In answer to Alderman Richards, Mr. Cushman 
said he commenced business in the street in 
March, hut did not think he had lost anything by 
the change because it was k town to but few per- 
sons. 

John Swee'ser (Sweetser & Abbott) objected to 
changing the names of streets, and particularly in 
this case, as it had never been a practice of run- 
ning a street across Washington street. He had 
spent a great deal of money for advertising, and 
thought it due to parties under such circum- 
stances to get the advantages ot such an outlay. 
It had been said that no one but the occupants of 
the streets objected to it, but he could not see how 
other parties could have such an interest in the 
matter as they had. It was an injury both to the 
owners and occupants. 

Wm. Clapp said he had written to business firms 
in relation to doing business in "places" in New 
York, and it was found that there had never been 
any inconvenience therefrom. In some instances 
it was considered more advantageous from being 
better known. 

R. G. Ferguson had spent §9000 in advertising, 
which he should consider as lost by a change. 

Mr. Adams had a lease of seven years, which he 
should be glad to be released from by giving $1000, 
should the new name be retained. In two in- 
stances, recently, on an inquiry of a policeman 
and of another person, he was assured that Avon 
street was on the Back Bay. He did not believe 
one business man in one hundred ever knew ot 
Avon place. 

Mr. Alden made some statements relative to the 
difficulties of customers in finding Avon street. 

Mr. Hillard, in conclusion, said ne should think 
it would be agreed that where a name was well 
known, it should not be changed without good 
and sufficient reasons. Iu regard to the change of 
name of the several streets now constituting Wash- 
ington street, as suggested by Alderman Talbot, 
there was a good reason tor calling them by one 
name, as a continuous street. In this street, 
both Temple place and Avon place were closed 
at one end a few years since, and there was 
no analogy in relation to making them one 
street. There was no evidence that any one 
in Temple place or in Avon place had asked 
for a change. There had been no investments in 
Avon place as a place of business, and it was 
asked of the greater to take up with the less, in 
giving the name of Avon street to Temple place. 
The greatest objection to the change was in the 
difficulty which it would give to the Savings In- 
stitution, the oldest in the United States. A large 
number of their depositors were ignorant persons, 
and no one except those who had had dealings 
with such parties could realize the difficulty which 
would result in giving a name which these deposi- 
tors had never heard of. 

On motion of Alderman Talbot the subject was 
laid on the table for one week. 

COMMON COUNCIL* PAPERS. 

The notice ot a vacancy in First Assistant As- 
sessors, caused by decease of Joseph W. Dudley, 
was referred to Committee on Assessors' Depart- 
ment, in concurrence. 

The following orders were passed, in concur- 
rence : 

Order to pay bills of certain members of the City 
Government. 

Order to form a consolidated Street Loan of 
$5,000,000, and to create a sinking fund to redeem 
the same. 



Order to create and substitute Registered City 
Bonds for Coupon Bonds. 

Order that the streets around the several school- 
houses be sprinkled at expense ot the city. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

The rules and orders, in relation to carriages, 
were considered. 

Alderman White stated that they were the same 
which were got up by the Board of Aldermen, and 
being familiar to Aldermen, he moved a second 
reading by the title. 

Alderman Pratt wished to call the attention of 
the Board to the fact of a distinction being made 
in the f ires to remote parts of the city, in connec- 
tion with the recent location of the new Normal 
school, as demonstrating the necessity, at the 
proper time, of making a like distinction in favor 
of free transportation to pupils residing in the 
portion of the city against which distinctions are 
now made. 

A motion of Alderman White t<> fill the blank in 
the sixteenth section by the date of 15th June, as 
the time which the regulation shall take effect, on 
the suggestion of Al derm in Tal Dot was modified 
to the 30th June and adopted. 

In the clause relating to baggage, it was stited 
that the charge for each extra article should have 
been "filteen" cents instead of "five," which was 
a misprint. 

Alderman Talbot hoped that paragraph relating 
to baggage would not be pressed and moved that 
it be struck out as follows, the clause being: ''One 
trunk, valise, box, bundle, carpet-bag, basket or 
other article used in travelling, shall be free of 
charge ; but for additional trunks or other articles, 
five cents each may be charged." 

Alderman White stated that the owners of coach- 
es never intended to charge their regular custom- 
ers anything for extra, baggage, and this provision 
was put in to meet a complaint, that many persons 
in returning lroin a journey witn their whole 
families, put a servant girl in a carriage, 
and pile on all their baggage, for which they pay 
but one fare, while all the rest of the family take 
the hoise-cars to their homes. 

Alderman Hawes stated that the majority of 
people, in paying for their fare, never asked to 
have more than one trunk carried. He moved to 
substitute 25 cents for 15. The amendment was 
lost. 

The motion of Alderman Talbot to strike out the 
clause relating to baggage was lost— 5 to 6. 

Alderman Baldwin suggested that the amount of 
baggage should be limited by weight, not to ex- 
ceed 200 pounds. 

Alderman Pratt suggested that the extra charge 
should apply to each two articles instead ot each 
one. 

The motion to substitute "fifteen" for "five," 
was put to vote and declared to be carried. 
A doubt was raised, and debace on it was allowed . 
Alderman Talbot hoped it would not prevail. If 
a oassenger was taken from the Clarendon House 
to" the Boston & Maine Kailroad depot, for which 
he paid $1, all of his baggage should be taken. If 
a charge was made for carrying an extra trunk, or 
valise, it would create confusion all the time. It 
was understood chat the owners of hacks were 
willing to go from the South End to the railroad 
depots for .fl. 

Alderman Seaver, in reply to a remark of Alder- 
man Pratt relative to his voting to protect the 
poor, said it was immaterial what they voted the 
fares to be, for the hackinen over his way make 
the l^w. 

Alderman Pratt said he was not inclined to take 
up this matter, but was disposed to protect those 
who needed it so far as he could. 

Alderman Bradlee said there was no reason whv 
hackmen should not be protected as well as other 
persons. In support of the extra cliarge, he made 
similar statements to those already made, that 
the baggage of four or five persons was often put 
upon a carriage, and one fare paid, while the oth- 
ers walked or rode in the cars. 

Alderman Baldwin was willing to believe that 
some of the people we' e close calculators, but 
such instances as were related were rare. Asa 
general rule, the baggage of most persons was 
light, and when there was more, it would be 
about right on a general average. 

Alderinan Pratt said it was the case that the 
same persons who are charged with coming home 
from a journey witli a large amount of baggage, 
olten go away with a mere satchel. 



136 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



The motion to substitute "fifteen" for "five" was 
carried, by a vote of 7 to 4, as follows : 

Yeas — "Bradlee, Fairbanks, Hawes, James, 
Seaver, Van Nostrand, White. 

jS ays— Baldwin, Pratt, Kice, Talbot. 

Alderman Pratt moved to amend by substituting 
"two" for "one" trunk, valise, &c. 

A debate ensued as to the construction of the 
language, whether the extra charge was to apply 
to each separate article, and whether in those enu- 
merated as to be free of charge, one ot each named 
could be carried. 

The question was raised also, by Alderman 
Hawes, as to the size of the box or bundle. 

Alderman White gave as his construction of the 
provision that one passenger could carry each of 
the six articles enumerated, free of charge. 

The motion of Alderman Pratt was lost. 

On motion of Alderman Talbot, the subject was 
laid on the table. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Alderman White, from the Committee on Li- 
censes, reported licenses for three newsboys, two 
boot-blacks, one to sell confectionery, and one to 
sell pop-corn. Severally accepted. 

Al lerman White also reported in favor ot li- 
censes to several innhoiders, victuallers, and of 
transfers of licenses. Accepted. 

Alderman White also reported in favor ot li- 
censes to George H. Davis to give concerts at the 
building known as the Coliseum from June 15th to 
20th ; to F. C. Barksdale, to exhibit Mexican curi- 
osities at No. 37 Avon street; to C. St. John, to ex- 
hibit a panorama at Tremont Temple; to Ann 
Irish, to give a conceit at Tremont Temple, May 
31 ; to Edward L. Wilson, to exhibit colored photo- 
graphs at Horticultural Hall June 1st to 4th. Sev- 
erally accepted. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Joint Standing Com- 
mittee on Claims, to whom was referred the peti- 
tion of Calvin F. Ellis, to be compensated for per- 
sonal injuries caused by a fall on Winter street, 
made a report, with a recommendation of the 
passage of the following order: 

Ordered, That the sum of $1000 be paid to Cal- 
vin F. Ellis, in full compensation for personal inju- 
ries received by him December 18th, 1867, on ac- 
count of a defect in Winter street, said Ellis to 
give a discharge satisfactory to the City Solicitor 
for all damages, costs and expenses on acconnt ot 
said injuries. 

The order was twice read and passed. 

Alderman Talbot, from the same Committee, to 
whom was referred the petition of Eliza A. San- 
ford, to he compensated for damages caused by 
impaired drainage in Middlesex street, made a re- 
port that the legal liability of the city tor damages 
from want of drainage in that section known as 
the Suffolk Street District, ceased under the stat- 
ute of limitation, in February last. A committee 
ot the City Council is now engaged in devising a 
plan for the improvement ot this district, under 
the authority of an act of the Legislature similar 
to the Church Street District Act. Under these 
circumstances the committee recommend that the 
petitioner have leave to withdiaw. 

The report was accepted. 

Alderman Richards, from the Committee on 
Public Buildings on the part of this Board, to 
whom was referred an order from the Common 
Council resnecting the ventilation of the Superior 



(Criminal) Court room, recommenled the passage 
of the following order, instead of that referred to 
them : 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Public 
Buildings, under the direction of the Committee 
on Public Buildings on the part ot this Board, be 
directed to cause the Superior (Criminal) Court 
room to be properly ventilated, at an expense not 
exceeding $2500, which sum, together with the 
amount already expended in repairs and altera 
tions of the County Court House, does not exceed 
the sum of $5000— said expense to be charged to 
the County of Suffolk. 

The order was read a second time and passed. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committtee on 
Streets, reported no action necessary on sundry 
notices of intention to build. Accepted. 

ORDERS PASSED. 

On motion ot Alderman White: 

Ordered, That the Committee on Health be and 
they are hereby requested to cause two public uri- 
nals to be constructed on the southerly end of the 
Court House in Court square, on the easterly and 
westerly corners, at an estimated cost of $1000 
each ; aud that the same be charged to appropria- 
tion for health. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent o f Health 
abate a nuisance rear of Salem street and on En- 
dicott street. 

On motion of Alderman Seaver, 

Ordered, That the Committee on Public Build- 
ings be authorized to repair and paint Faneuil 
Hall Market House, the expense thereof to be 
charged to the appropriation for Public Buildings. 

On motion of Aldemian Pratt, 

Ordered, That the Chief-of-Police be and he is 
hereby directed to notify Messrs. D. B. Brooks & 
Brother, No. 55 Washington street, to remove the 
shade in front of their premises within ten days, 
the same being an obstruction to the lighting of 
the streets. 

On motion of Alderman Fairbanks, 

Ordered, Tnat the Superintendent of Sewers be 
directed to construct a sewer in Orchard and in 
Eustis streets, and report a schedule of the ex- 
pense to this Board, pursuant to law. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Sewers be 
directed to construct a sewer in Cabot street, from 
Culvert street to Linden park, and in Vernon 
street, between Ca'.iot and Belmont streets, and re- 
port a schedule of the expense to this Board. 

ORDERS OF NOTICE. 

On the petition of Patrick McAleer for leave to 
place a steam engine in building No. 15 Province 
street. Hearing Monday, June 21, 4 P. M. 

On the proposed construction of a sewer in Ce- 
dar street, between Highland street and Lambert 
avenue. Hearing Tuesday, June 8, 4 P. M. 

On the proposed construction of a sewer in Mt. 
Pleasant avenue, oetween Dudley and Vine streets, 
and in Forest street, between Mt. Pleasant avenue 
and Vine street. Hearing Tuesday, June 8, 4 P. M. 

On the proposed construction or a sewer in 
Roc'iville street. Hearing Tuesday, June 8, 4 P. M. 

On the proposed widening of Federal street, be- 
tween High and Broad streets. Hearing Monday, 
June 14, 4P.M. 

On the proposed widening of Hairison avenue, 
on notice of Russell Scott of intention to build. 
Hearing Monday June 14, 4 P. M. 

Adjourned to Tuesday, June 8, 4 P. M. 



137 



COMMON COUNCIL 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of tlie Common Council, 

JUNE 3, 1869. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Common 
Council was held this evening, at 8 o'clock, Wm. 
G. Harris, the President, in the chair. 

PAPERS FROM THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

The several petitions of assignees of Charles W . 
Griffiths, for abatement of tax ; of Joseph Azarian, 
for damages for highway obstruction; of Cook, 
Jordan & Morse, for the dredging of Hats; and of 
Sarah Nicks, to be compensated for personal in- 
juries, were referred in concurrence. 

The renort leave to withdraw on petition of E. A. 
Sanford to be compensated for impaired drainage 
on Middlesex street, was accepted, in concurrence. 

The following orders were each read once: 

order to repair and paint Faneutl Hall Market 
House. . 

Order to pay C. F. Ellis $1000, in full for personal 
injuries received by him, Dec. 18, 1867, from a de- 
lect in Winter street. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

The following orders were severally read a sec- 
ond time and passed : 

Order to furnish tickets for passage over East 
Boston Ferries to such pupils of Ward 1, attending 
the Latin, English High, and Girls' High and Nor- 
mal Schools, as may require them. 

Order authorizing the payment of $1436 63 to 
Martin Hayes & Co., for work done on St. James 
Park. 



Order to change the remaining crank signal- 
boxes to automatic boxes, at an expense not ex- 
ceeding $3300. 

The order authorizing a loan of $3,000,000, in an- 
ticipation of the income of the present financial 
year, was passed, by a vote of 44 yeas, no nays. 

The order to alter and enlarge Police Station 
No. 6, at an estimated cost of $13,000, being on its 
passage, 

On motion of Mr. Flynn of Ward Seven it was 
laid on the table. 

On motion of Mr. Ryan of Ward 13, it was 

Ordered, That the Committee on Public Instruc- 
tion be requested to visit the Primary School in 
Williams block, Dearborn District, and ascertain 
whether better accommodations are not required 
for the numerous pupils in that school. 

Mr. Snow of Ward Eleven made a motion that 
the Council meet hereafter at 4 o'clock in the after- 
noon. He said he would not press the question, 
but offered it to get the sense of the Council, and 
ascertain whether it would not be more conven- 
ient for the members to meet in the afternoon, 
and avoid the evening session, with the extreme 
heat of the gas light. 

Mr. Ingalls of Ward Twelve suggested whether 
the heat of the sun and the hot air of the afternoon 
would not toe as toad as the gas light, especially on 
such a hot day as today. 

Mr. Wadsworth of Ward Four opposed the mo- 
tion, and expressed the hope that no change would 
be made in the hour of meeting until the Council 
adjourned over for the summer vacation. 

Mr. Denny of Ward Ten objected also to a change, 
for it frequently happened that committee meet- 
ings were held at four o'clock in the afternoon. It 
would be much more inconvenient for him to at- 
tend meetings of the Council at that hour, and 
quite as uncomfortable as in the evening. 

The motion was lost. 

Adjourned. 



138 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 

JUNE 8, 1869. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Board of 
Aldermen was held this afternoon at 4 o'clock, 
Mayor Sburtleff in the chair. 

APPOINTMENTS MADE AND CONFIRMED. 

Special police officers without pay, at the Col- 
iseum, in the month of June — Gllman Xyng, Wal- 
ter H. Sturtevant, Erastus E. Jeffrey, Calvin C. 
Wilson, James 8. Young, Andrew S. Fisher, James 
M. Huggins, Charles E. Clapp, Wm. K. Kichards, 
Thomas Nannery, William H. Soribner, Thomas 
E. Porter. 

Wm. R. Tyler and 19G others, special police offi- 
cers in June and July. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

Stephen Bowen and others, lor the extension of 
the Grenville stieet sewer. 

Benjamin Perkins, for the construction of a 
sewer' in Highland avenue. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Sewers. 

Thomas Prendergast and others, that Leeds 
street he accepted and laid out as a public high- 
way. Keferred to Committee on Streets. 

Charles L. Eraser and others, that the city would 
take charge of the clock on the church corner of 
Meridian and London streets. Keferred to Com- 
mittee on Clocks. 

Wm. K. Watson, lor appointment as an auc- 
tioneer, at '275 Hauover stieet. Retfrred to Com- 
mittee on Licenses. 

Henry Sayles and others, that the iron fence on 
Commonwealth avenue be continued to Clarendon 
street. 

James A. Maynard, for postponement of order 
for him to furnish edgestones and lay sidewalks 
on Eutaw street. 

American Watch Co., for leave to set telegraph 
poles on Western avenue. 

Cochituate Water Board, that White and Brooks 
streets be graded. 

John C. McDavitt and Michael Killilea and oth- 
ers, for suspension or revocation of order requir- 
ing them to lay sidewalks on Everett street. 

Stephen G. Allen, that the wooden steps on pas- 
sageway leading lrom Dartmouth street in rear of 
Tremont street be replaced by stone steps. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Paving. 

German-English School Association, for abate- 
ment ol tax assessed on their property in 1867 and 
1868. Referred to Committee on Assessors' De- 
partment. 

James M. Gardiner, for compensation ior a pa- 
tent right used by the city in the construction of 
its Fire Alarm Telegraph. Keferred to the Com- 
mittee on Claims. 

The following remonstrances were presented : 

Eben Howes and others, against a change of the 
name or numbers of West Chester park, iiearing 
assigned to Monday next, 4% o'clock, P. M. 

Charles B. Hall and others, against a change of 
the name or numbers of Chester square. Hearing 
on Monday next, i}£ o'clock. 

NOTICES OF INTENTION TO BUILD. 

Frederick Balch, Commercial street, head of 
Constitution wharf; Gerrish & Lowry, 88 Morth 
Margin street; S. G. Chase, Webster street, near 
Lawrence street; I. & H. M. Harmon, Beacon 
street, west oi Dartmouth street; T. B. Huntoon, 
26 and 28 Woodburn street; C. P. Stetson, corner 
of Battery and Commercial streets; Joseph H. 
Bancroft, 121 Hanover street; C. Chipman & Son, 
9 to 27 Hanover street; C. & G. Barker, 42 Beverly 
street; Thomas Dolan, 1048 Tremont street ; Wm. 
M. Rumery, corner of Essex and Chauncv streets; 
James Sweetser, Saratoga street ; Joseph J. Hos- 
mer, 635 Tremont street; H. B. Stritton, Thud 
street, between Band C streets; B. F. Deming, 
corner ot Beacon and Exeter streets. 

HEARINGS ON ORDERS OF NOTICE. 

The several orders of notice on the proposed con- 
struction of a common sewer in Cedar street, be- 
tween Highland street and Lambertavenue; on the 



construction ot a sewer in Mount Pleasant avenue, 
northerly end, between Dudley and Vine streets, 
and in Forest stnet, between Moun* Pleasant ave- 
nue and Vine street; on the construction of a sewer 
in Rockville place ; also on the proposed widening 
ot Bromfleld street, by taking land of the Boston 
Wesleyan Association, were taken up, by assign- 
ment. No person appearing in either case, the re- 
ports were recommitted. 

The hearing on the proposed widening of Eliot 
street was taken up. 

James M. Keith appeared for the heirs of Jona- 
than Patten. The previous widening, he said, was 
in cutting off one estate belonging to those par- 
ties, and this proposed to cut off two more. Inas- 
much as this was not a general widening ot the 
street, and did not promote the public conven- 
ience, it was objected to the proposed measure. 
By this widening, there was no increased facilities 
for travel, which there would be in the widening of 
the whole street. The primary movement in this 
widening was lrom repairs or. the Holmes estate, 
which have already been accomplished, and there 
was no special call for this widening at the pres- 
ent time. He objected further that the proposed 
widening was a wrong to the heirs of the Patten 
estate. By the widening which has already taken 
place, the corner estate was ruined, and for a year 
no settlement has been made, and no price can be 
obtained for the strip remaining, at all pro- 
portioned to that of the adjoining estate, i'he 
proposed widening will be a total destruction of 
this estate, as it was of the other aheady cut off. 
The heirs had been deprived of their means of liv- 
ing, and kept out of their money. Unless the en- 
tire widening is made, the public convenience is 
not met, and it the parties build as contemplated 
by the proposed widening, the building will be set 
back so far as to injure the property. Under the 
circumstances, it woultt be an act of injustice to 
these parties to cut off their estate, as proposed. 

The report was recommitted. 

COMMON COUNCIL PAPERS. 

The following orders were passed in concur- 
rence: 

Order for Committee on Public Instruction to 
see if additional accommodations are net required 
for pupils in ''Williams Block" Primary School. 

Order tor a temporary loan of three millions of 
dollars, in anticipation of revenue. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Alderman White, from the Committee on Li- 
censes, reported in favor of licenses to six news- 
boys, two boys as bootblacks, and one to sell pop- 
corn. Accepted. 

Alderman White also reported in favor of licens- 
es to A. A. Childs to exhibit paintings and statuary 
at 127 Tremont street ; to Samuel Turner, to give 
theatrical and other exhibitions at 119 Haverhill 
street; and to C. C. O'Donnell for leave to give a 
concert at Franklin Hall, June 11. Severally ac- 
cepted. 

Also for the transfer of wagon licenses, and 
licenses as innholders and victuallers. Accepted. 

Aldeiman White reported in favor of licenses to 
Morris Brothers to give a concert in the building 
in St. James Park, June 11; to Dexter & Meeker, 
to exhibit statuary on the Back Bay; to L. A. 
Hitchcock, for a Museum of Art, near the Colise- 
um; to Rich, Hart & Trowbridge, to give concerts 
at the corner of St. James and Clarendon streets ; 
to J. Cushing, to exhibit a sea-serpent rear of 248 
Boyiston street. 

Alderman Talbot said he was opposed to grant- 
ing any licenses to persons to give exhibitions near 
the Coliseum. 

Alderman White stated that there would be no 
noise by the exhibitions to injure the concerts at 
the Coliseum. The committee had all been down 
to see these places and they could not see that any 
harm could be done. II the places proved to be 
noisy or injurious the licenses may be revoked at 
any time. 

Alderman Talbot said the projectors ot the Jubi- 
lee had expended$200,000 inane interests of peace 
and good order, and he should consider it an injus- 
tice to allow these exhibitions to be there, it 
would be drawing a great number of persons 
around, causing a disturbance, much to the injury 
of the proposed conceits. 

Alderman Pratt believed it would be an advan- 
tage to grant the licenses, when there would be 
some means of reculating and controlling them. 



JUNE 8 



18 6 9 



139 



Alderman Bradlee opposed granting licenses, for 
it was Well known that the side shows at musters 
and other places become great nuisances. In a 
great enterprise like this there should be no 
such places aoout it. It would add to the dig- 
nity of the Peace Festival should the Board of 
Aldermen decline to give a license to these exhibi- 
tions. 

Alderman Pratt thought the argument against 
granting licenses to be lucid, if there was any 
ground to stand upon. He would have these 
places under regulation rather than allow gam- 
bling or rum shops to be kept open m the vicinity 
of the Coliseum. In no other way could they have 
control of these exhibitions than by licensing 
them. . 

Alderman White stated in relation to Morris 
Brothers, that they had no purpose to give con- 
certs in the afternoon, nor at any other time, 
should they prove to be an an annoyance. Their 
building was located at quite a distance from the 
Coliseum, as it was well understood, and their 
performances were not likely to create any annoy- 
ance. 

Alderman Baldwin saitl that iri a conversation 
with the originators of the Festival, lie was satis- 
fied thac it the wishes of the Executive Committee 
were consulted, these licenses would be refused. 

Alderman Kicharrfs inquired if the licenses were 
granted, whether it would be in the power of the 
committee to revoke them ? , 

Alderman White replied that they could at any 
time. 

Alderman Richards declared the booths in the 
vicinity of the Coliseum to" be nuisances. The 
projectors of the Jubilee had got it up for a patri- 
otic purpose, and they did not expect to make a 
cent by it ; it was believed there would be a large 
gathering, which would redound to the national 
honor. These parties have not got a license, and 
by giving the licenses it will increase their 
chances of making money, and of extending the 
nuisances. He did not understand, however, that 
a license would be given to keep rum shops or 
gambling places. 

Alderman Pratt again remarked . that there 
would be no control over these places without a 
license being given them ; yet if there is a decided 
opinion against granting licenses, he would not 
press the matter. 

Alderman White expressed surprise that the 
Alderman from Ward Five should make so much 
opposition. He bad asked him something- about 
the matter, and it was replied that it was designed 
to report in favor of the licenses. If he had been 
opposed to the licenses, it would have been well 
that he should have said something about it, in- 
stead of talking about it to others, and opposing it 
here. 

Alderman Talbot said it had been known from 
the start that he was opposed to the erection of 
these booths, and to the granting of licenses lor 
exhibitions in that vicinity. 

Alderman Bichards said he did not speak of the 
matter as a member of the Committee on the Mu- 
sical Festival, but as a member of the Board of 
Aldermen. He did not know the opinions of the 
members of that Committee, but believed that 
they, should be protected as far as possible. 

Alderman Rice, said the committee would have 
prevented any of these exhibitions in the vicinity 
of the Coliseum, could they have done so. 

Alderman Pratt said it was evident all of the Al- 
dermen were of the same opinion relative to these 
exhibitions, whilef they had different ways of car- 
rying them out. Believing tbat by a license they 
could better be controlled, he yet deferred his own 
opinion to others. 

The yeas and nays were taken on tho several re- 
ports, and the licenses were refused by a vote of 5 
to 7, as follows: 

Yeas— Fairbanks, Hawesi Rice, "Van Nostrand, 
White. 

Nays— Baldwin, Bradlee, James, Pratt, Richards, 
Seaver, Talbot. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on Streets, 
reported no action necessary on sundry notices of 
intention to build. Accepted. 

Alderman White, from the Committee on 
Health, reported leave to withdraw on petition of 
S. G. Cheever for removal of nuisance in Shaw- 
mut avenue, near Madison street, by the construc- 
tion of a sewer. Accepted, 



Alderman White also reported on the petition 
of the Bay State Brick Company tor leave to build 
a stable on Stanhope street, that leave be granted. 
Accepted. 

Also an order, which was passed, for the abate- 
ment of nuisances on Dove and Charles streets. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Joint Special Com- 
mittee on the Suffolk Street District, made a re- 
pott that the surveys and plans ot said district 
which they were authorized to make under an or- 
der passed January 15, 1869, are now complete J, 
but before any recommendation can bt-. made as to 
the best manner of proceeding to abate the nui- 
sance eausen by the impaired drainage, it will be 
necessary to have a special valuation of the prop- 
erty made, and estimates of the cost of raising the 
buildings and the grade of the. territory. The ap- 
propriation of §4000 made last year for surveys 
and plans has been expended, and the Commit- 
tee therefore request a small additional appropria- 
tion to procure the estimates. The passage of the 
accompanying order is recommended : 

Ordered, That the Joint Special Committee on 
the Suffolk street district, so called, be authorized 
to maku an appraisal of the value of the lands, 
buildings and other fixtures included within 
the district described in Section 1, Chapter 277, 
Acts ot 1868, and also to procure estimates of the 
cost of raising the buildings and the grade of said 
lands, and any. oljher information which they may 
require, at an expense not exceeding $2000, said 
sum to be transferred for that purpose from the 
Reserved Fund. 

Read twice and passed. 

Alderman Richards, trom the Joint Special Com- 
mittee on Public Buildings, who were directed to 
procure plans and proposals for erecting a Gram- 
mar School building on the lot of land owned by 
the citv on the corner of Paris and Decatur streets, 
reported that they have attended to that duty, and 
find that it will cost to erect the said building ac- 
cording to the plans which bave been approved by 
the Committee on Public Instruction, the sum of 
$90,000. They would therefore recommend the pas- 
sage of the following orders : . 

Ordered, That the Committee on Public Build- 
ings be authorized to erect a Grammar School- 
house on the lot of land owned by the city on the 
corner of Paris and Decatur streets, hi Ward One, 
according to the plan approved by the Committee 
on Public Instruction, at a cost of $90,000. 

Ordered, That the Treasurer be authorized to 
borrow, under the direction of the Committee on 
.Finance, the sum of $90,000, to be appropriated for 
the erection of a Grammar Schoolhouse in Ward 
One. 

Read twice and passed. 

Alderman "Van Nostrand, from the Committee on 
the Assessor's Department, to whom was referred 
the petition of the assignees of Charles W. Grif- 
fiths, for abatement of tax, recommended that the 
petitioners have leave to withdraw. Accepted. 

Alderman Van Nostrand, from the same com- 
mittee, to wbom was referred the notices from the 
Assessors that vacancies existed in their Board 
caused by the death of one of the First Assistant 
Assessors and also of one Second Assistant Asses- 
sor for. Ward Four, reported that no further action 
is necessary. Accepted. 

ORDERS PASSED. 

On motion ot Alderman Seaver, 

Ordered, That the Joint Snecial Committee on 
the subiectof the East Boston ferries be requested 
to ascertain and report the terms upon, which the 
East Boston Ferry Company will dispose of their 
franchise and property to the city of Boston. 

Ordered, That the Chief of Police be directed to 
notify Kingman Brothers & Co. to remove within 
ten days their projecting sign at No. 91 Summer 
street, and if they do not so remove it, that the 
Chief of Police be and is hereby authorized to 
prosecute them, according to law. 

On motion of Alderman Richards, 

Ordered, Tbat the Committee on the Church 
Street District be authorized to raise and grade 
Tremont street between Pleasant street and the 
Boston & Albany Railroad bridge, according to 
the established grade ot said street; also to pave 
said street with small granite blocks, the expense 
thereof to be charged to the Church Street appro- 
priation, at an estimated cost of $20,000. 

On motion ot Alderman Pratt, 



140 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



Ordered, That the Committee on County Ac- 
counts be and thfy hereby are authorized to con- 
tract with some suitable party or parties to ar- 
range and classify, in such manner as the com- 
mittee may direct, papers and indices in the Pro- 
bate Court, which in the judgment of said com- 
mittee may require such disposition, the expense 
thereof to be charged to the appropriation tor the 
County of Suffolk. 

On motion of Alderman White, 

Ordered, That the Superintendent ol Health be 
and he is hereby instructed to furnish J. M. Mul- 
lane, corner of Huuneman street and Harrison ave- 
nue, twenty loads of ashes, more or less, and to 
Charles T.Barry, on Alpine street, fifty ljadsof 
ashes, more or less, and that, said Mullane and Bar- 
ry be charged at the rate of fifty cents per load for 
such ashes, so delivered. 

On motion of Alderman James, 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets be 
authorized to close Tremont street agaiost the 

Eassage of vehicles, from Boylston street to the 
ridge over the tracks of the Boston& Albany 
Railroad, until the work ol raising, grading and 
paving said street shall have been completed. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Streets, 
under the direction of the Committee on Paving, 
be authorized to complete the widening of Dor- 
chester street at the bridge over the tracks oi the 
Old Colony & Newport Railroad, by extending the 
abutments and rebuilding the wing and retaining 
walls of said bridge. Also to build an iron bridge 
upon said abutments, at an esiimated cost of $1200. 

Ordered, That the Chief of Police be directed to 
notify the owners and abutters on Warren avenue, 
from Berkeley street to Dartmouth street, to fur- 
nish edgestooes and lay their sidewalks with 
brick. 

Ordered, That the Chief ot Police be directed to 
notify the owners and abutters on Clarendon 
street between Tremont and Appleton streets, to 
furnish edgestones and lay their sidewalks with 
brick. 

Ordered, that the Chief of Police be directed to 
notify the owners and abutteis on Old Harbor 
street, to furnish edgestores and lay their side- 
walks with brick. 

On motion of Alderman Van Nostrand, 

Ordered, That warrants be issued lor the meet- 
ing of the legal voters of this city in their respec- 
tive wards on Tuesday, the 22d day of June, in- 
stant, at 9 o'clock A. M. then and there to give in 
their ballots,"Yes" or "No," in answer to the ques- 
tion, "Shall an act passe 1 by the Legislature of 
the Commonwealth in tne year 1869, entitled 'an 
act to unite the city of Boston and the town of 
Dorchester' be accepted?" The polls to be kept 
open until six o'clock P. M. 

Ordered, That 10,000 copies of the act "To unite 
the city of Boston and the town of Dorchester," 
together with the report of the Commissioners on 
the annexation of Dorchester to this city, ana the 
reports of the Legislative Committee on the same 
subject, be printed for public distribution, and the 
expense charged to the appropriation for printing. 

On motion of Alderman Talbot, 

Ordered, That the Committee on Laying Out and 
Widening Streets be and they hereby are author- 
ized to purchase the balance of the estates on Way 
street left after the extension of Broadway, be- 
longing to Samuel A. Way and Alice C. Driscoll, 
containing 962 square feet, at an expense not ex- 
ceeding $5100, the same to be charged to the 
Broadway loan. 

Ordered, That Avon street, from Tremont street 
to Washington street, be hereafter called Temple 
place, and that Avon street, between Washington 
street and Chiuncy streets, be called Avon place. 

Ordered, That there t>e paid to George W. Pren- 
tice, Trustee under the will of Samuel Woods, 
$5485 for land taken and damares occasioned by 
the widening of High street, under resolve of July 
16th, 1807. 

On motion of Alderman Talbot, an order was 
passed to apportion into three parts the better- 
ment assessed upon the estate of the heirs ol Jos. 
H. Thayer, tor the opening, of Avon street. 



Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on Laying 
Out and Widening Streets, submitted the several 
orders necessary for the laying out, widening and 
extension of streets on Fort Hill, with the esti- 
mated cost of the same, as follows: 
Purchase street widening and grading. . $226,601 05 
Hamilton street " " 97,636 12 

Sturgis street '• " 212,404 50 

Hartford street " " - 76,087 50 

Washington avenue " " 46,176 75 

Hign street, from Pearl street to Broad 

street 93,536 85 

Pearl place, from Pearl street to Broai 

street 22,470 00 

Wendell street grade 7,700 00 

Washington square grade 119,600 00 

The orders were severally read once. 

An order of notice was passed for a hearing of 
Central Wharf Corporation on a proposed con- 
struction of a sewer through Atlantic avenue, 
June 21, 4 P.M. 

On motion of Alderman Hawes, the report and 
order for plans and estimates for a boiler-house and 
coal-shed for Charity Bureau on Bowker street, 
were taken from the table, and on a further motion 
the report and order were recommitted to the 
Committee on Overseers of the Poor, with instruc - 
tions to ascertain and report whether accommoda- 
tions for an Armory for the National Lancers can 
be furnished in connection with the boiler-house 
and coal-shed, without interfering with the insti- 
tutions under the charge of the Overseers of the 
Poor. 

Alderman Van Nostrand moved to take from 
the table the report and order to appropriate $3000 
to the Koxbury Latin School. Carried. 

In advocacy of the order, the mover said he 
voted against it on a former occasion through a 
want of information. The school was not of a sec- 
tarian character, and as it was open to pupils from 
all sections of the city, he hoped the order would 
pass. 

Alderman Talbot said he was opposed to making 
appropriations for such a school, as a matter of 
principle. It was not the policy of the city to 
make appropriations to schools not under its con • 
trol,— private scnools, which were outside of the 
School Committee. He had no doubt that the 
trustees of this school would expend the money as 
judiciously as any other gentlemen, but it would 
be a bad precedent to vote the city funds for other 
than public echools, as there were many private 
institutions that might put in a claim lor aid. 

Alderman Richards stated that he voted against 
the order, but on understanding the matter better, 
should vote lor it. on the ground of economy, 
many pupils attending the school who would 
otherwise attend the Latin School in this part of 
the city. The school was practically a public 
school. 

Alderman Talbot said he understood that the 
school in Bedford street was not full, and that 
many boys were allowed to attend the school one 
year in advance, in order to keep up its numbers. 

Alderman Seaver said he voted in the negative 
because he believed the school had funds enough 
to support it. He had always been familiar with 
the scnool, and knew that it had a large fund, 
and with a little aid now the.fund would in a few 
years more than support it. 

The order was passed, by a vote of 11 yeas to 1 
nay — Alderman Talbot — and is as follows : 

Ordered, That there be allowed and paid to the 
trustees ot the Roxbury Latin School tne sum of 
$3000, to be expended in such manner as they shall 
deem expedient, for the maintenance of said 
school ; provided that said trustees shall make the 
annual report mentioned in the act of the Legisla- 
ture concerning said school, approved April 13, 
1869, said sum to be transferred for that purpose 
from the reserved fund. 

Adjourned to 7}£ o'clock. 

On coming together in the evening, the Board 
went into convention with the School Committee, 
to fill vacancies in that Board. On concluding the 
business of the convention the Board adjourned. 



141 



COMMON COUNCIL 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Common Council, 

JUNE 10, 1869. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Common 
Council was held this evening at 8 o'clock. 

In the absence of the President, the Council was 
called to order by Joel Richards of Ward Eight, 
tne senior member, when a ballot took place for 
President pro tern. 

Messrs. Gray of Ward Twelve, Rogers of Ward 
Fifteen and Tucker of Ward Six were appointed a 
comn.ittee to receive and count the votes for a pre- 
siding officer. • The committee reported as follows : 

Whole number of votes 50 

Necessary to a choice. 26 

Francis A. Osborn 24 

G. C. Jndson 8 

Thos. L. Jenks 8 

Joel Richards 4 

James M. Keith .• 4 

U. W. Pickering, Geo. E. Young, l each. 2 
Mr. Keith requested that his name be not used 
in further balloting. 
A second ballot resulted as follows : 

Whole number of votes 50 

Necessary to a choice 2G 

Francis A. Osborn 32 

Thos. L. Jenks 13 

G. C. Judson 2 

Winslow B. Lucas, Joel Richards, and J. 

H. Pote, 1 each 3 

Mr. Osborn was declared elected, took the chair , 
and expressed uis thanks for the respect shown 
towards him. 

Mr. Gray of Ward Twelve moved a suspension 
of the rules, to enable him to move to take up from 
the table the order to alter and enlarge Police 
Station No. 6, at an estimated cost of 13.000. 

Mr. Jenks of Ward Three raised a question of 
order that the records of the Council had not been 
read. 

The Chair stated that under the amended rules 
it was not necessary to read the records unless 
called for. 
Mr. Jenks asked that the records may he read. 
Mr. Johnson of Ward Twelve moved that the 
Council adjourn. Lost. 

Mr. Keith of Ward 15 moved that the reading of 
the records be dispensed with. Carried. 

Mr. J enks wished to know whether it was not 
a privilege of a member to have the records read. 
The Chair replied that the matter was entirely 
in the hands <u the Council, which might decide 
at any time whether or not the records should be 
read. 

The motion for a suspension of the rules was car- 
ried, when it was voted to take up the order re- 
ferred to. 

The order was passed by a vote of 49 yeas, no 
nays. 

PAPERS FROM THE BOARD OP ALDERMEN. 

Petitions from the Board of Aldermen were re- 
ferred, in concurrence. 

The following reports were accepted in concur- 
rence : 

Report leave to withdraw on petition of the as- 
signees of Charles W. Griffiths for abatement of a 
tax. 

Report that no further action is necessary on 
the notices from the Assessors concerning the va- 
cancies existing in their Board. 

The order authorizing the purchase of the balance 
of the estates on Way street, left after the extension 
of Broadway, belonging to S. A. Way and A. C. 
Driscoll, was read once. 

The following orders were read twice and pass- 
ed: 

Order for the Committee on the East Boston 
Ferries to ascertain the terms on which the East 
Boston Ferry Co. will dispose of their franchise 
and property to the city. 

Order that the report and order from the Com- 
mittee on the Overseers of the Poor relating to a 
boiler-house and coal-sheds for the Charity Bureau 
be recommitted, with instructions to ascertain 



whether accommodations for an armory for the 
National Lancers can be furnished in Connection 
with such house and sheds without interfering 
with the institutions under the charge of the Over- 
seers, i .;::.! 

Order authorizing the Committee on the Church 
Street District to raise the grade and pave Tre- 
mont street between Pleasant street and the Bos- 
ton & Albany Railroad bridge. . 

Order that ten thousand copies of the Act to 
unite Boston and Dorchester, together with the 
reports of the Commissioners andthe Legislative 
Committees on the subject, be printed for public 
distribution. - 

The order authorizing the Committee on the 
Suffolk Street District to appraise the lands, budd- 
ings and fixtures on the district described in Sec. 
1, Chapter 277. of the Acts of 1868, and to procure 
estimates of the cost ot raising the'.buildings and 
grading the lands, and such other information as 
they may require, at an expense not exceeding 
$2000, was passed by a vote of 42 yeas, 1 nay. 

The report and order to pay the Trustees of the 
Roxbury Latin School $3000, to be expended as 
they shall deem expedient for the maintenance of 
said school, was read once, and the question being 
on its passage, 

Mr. Keith of Ward Fifteen said he wished only 
to say a single word on this subject. Much of the 
argument in favor of this measure is to be found 
in the report of the Committee. There had been a 
mistaken impression in the Board of Aldermen 
that this was a sectarian school, but it was far 
otherwise, and there was no foundation for such 
an impression. The school was of .great excel- 
lence, and on account of its character many pupils 
were now attending it from other portions of this 
city, greatly relieving the Latin School of this 
city. . 

Mr. Keith stated the circumstances under which 
the school was founded, a large (amount of land 
having been given for its endowment. This' land 
was under leases for a great length of time, and 
some of them as long as ninety-nine years, at a 
very small sum. Many of them have nearly expir- 
ed, and the land in some cases is worth at least 
fifty cents a foot. When renewed the fund for the 
support of the school will be much increased, and 
enable the trustees to enlarge its bounds. This 
school needs but temporarary assistance, and the 
fund will soon give it an ample support. The 
building is now in need of painting and repairs, 
and additional reference hooks are required. 

Mr. Jenks of Ward Three said he should be com- 
pelled to vote against the order. By its passage it 
would be the opening of a door for appropriations 
to other than public schools,' and other private 
schools will ask for aid from the City Council. If 
one is aided, then another and another will expect 
it, with a tendency to sectarianism, until our sys- 
tem of public schools will be broken up. If the 
school had not sufficient funds for its support, its 
friends should make it up by subscription. 

Mr. Pickering ol Ward Fourteen thought there 
was no danger to be apprehended, as stated by 
the gentleman from Ward Three. The school was 
to all purposes a public school, open to 
all scholars, and even before annexation was 
availed of as such. It was true it was managed 
by Trustees, as that was the method determined 
on when it was founded. It might in fact be said 
to be a branch of the Boston Latin School. He 
repeated that the school was virtually a public 
school, and he hoped the order would pass. 

The order was passed by a vote of 40 yeas to 1 
nay — Mr. Jenks. 

Report and orders authorizing the erection of a 
Grammar Schoolhouse on the city's land at the 
corner of Paris and Decatur street?, in Ward One, 
at a cost of $90,000, and that the Treasurer be au- 
thorized to borrow said sum to be appropriated 
therefor, were read once. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

The following orders were severally read a sec- 
ond time and passed : 

Order to repair and paint Faneuil Hall Market 
House. 

Order to pay C. F. Ellis $1000, in full for personal 
injuries received by him, Dec. 18, 1867, from a de- 
fect in Winter street. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Mr. Yonng of Ward One, from the Joint Stand- 
ing Committee on Water, to whom was referred 
the communication from the Cochituate Water 



JUNE lO 



18 6 9 . 



142 



Board requesting authority to contract with the 
Mystic Water Board of Charlestown to supply 
water to East Boston from Mystic Pond, having 
considered the subject, respectfully recommended 
the passage of the accompanying order: 

Ordered, That the Cochituate Water Board bs 
and they are hereby authorized to contract with 
the Mystic Water Board, or the city of Charles- 
town, for supplying Ward One (East Boston) with 
water from Mystic Fond, upon such terms and 
conditions as the said Cochituate Water Board 
may deem expedient, subject to the approval of 
H is Honor the Mayor. 

The order was read once. 

ORDERS. 

Mr. Keith of Ward Fitteen, offered the following : 

Ordered, That the Committee on Printing be in- 
structed to obtain, if practicable, the assent of his 
Honor, the Mayor, to the publication of his manu- 
script relating to the history and topography of 
the city of Boston and its harbor; and if such as- 
sent can be obtained, to cause 1000 copies of such 
manuscript to be printed lor the use of the city, 
the expense, thereof to be charged to the appro- 
priation for incidental expenses. 

Mr. Keith, in explanation, and in support of the 
order, stated that the Mayor had in his hands a 
manuscript history of the city and its harbor, the 
result of many years' labor. From his antiquarian 
research and careful investigation, the acquisition 
of such a history would be a very valuable contri- 
bution to the subject, which no labor otherwise 
could procure. It is now in that condition, in a 
condensed form, to be used to advantage. In con- 
versation with the Mayor a few days since on the 
subject, he was satisfied that a request of the kind 
proposed would be acceded to, and the resultsof his 
labor would be placed in a permanent form. But 
few people, indeed, could have performed such a 
labor, and the opportunity should not be lost of 
availing ourselves of the benefit of it. 

Mr. Wells of Ward Three moved a reference of 
the order to the Committee on the Harbor, as a 
proper disposition of it. 

Mr. Keith opposed the reference, believing it 
more appropriately belonged to the Committee on 
Printing. He could not see the necessity of such a 
reference. If gentlemen were not prepared to 
vote for it, he had no objection to its lying over. 

The motion of Mr. Wells was lost, when the or- 
der was read once. 

Mr. Flynn of Ward Seven offered ths following 
order : 

Ordered, That the Committee on Claims, in 
investigating the alleged claim of Charles Burrill 
vs. the city of Boston, be instructed to inquire 
whether or not Mr. Burrill did furnish the number 
of men which he claims? 



Second, Whether or not some of these identical 
men were not 'also credited to and paid for by 
other towns or cities in this State? 

Third, Whether or not some of these identical 
men were not also credited to and paid for by 
other States, or towns and cities within' said 
States? 

Fourth, Whether or not suits at law are now 
pending between Mr. Burrill and other towns and 
cities for the identical persons alleged by him to 
have been furnished to the quota of Boston? 

And that said Committee be authorized to send 
for persons and papers to satisfy said inquiries. 

The order was read once. 

Mr. Keith objected to the passage of such an or- 
der, which would in effect take the matter out of 
the hands of the Committee, and dictate to them 
the course which they should pursue in their in- 
vestigation. If after making an investigation 
their report is not sufficiently full, they may be in- 
structed, as proposed. Until a report was made 
he should consider the action as premature. 

Mr. Jenks of Ward Three thought the gentleman 
had mistaken the terms ot the order. The order 
tlid not dictate to the committee, Dut was designed 
simply to aid them in their investigations. He 
wished to move an amendment, which he indicat- 
ed, and was requested to put it in writing. 

Mr. Well i of Ward Three, in support of the sug- 
gested amendment, stated that 400 dead men were 
credited to the quota of Ward Three. 

Mr. Denny of Ward Ten said the committee 
could not avoid investigating the very matters 
contained in the proposed questions, if they did 
their duty. While tnere might be no harm done 
by the order, the action proposed was superfluous. 

Mr. Flynn, in explanation, said he had intended 
offering the order some months since, having some 
knowledge of *the matter. Since the matter had 
been referred to the Committee he had understood 
that the counsel of . Mr. Burrill did not desire an 
investigation at present, and he wished the in- 
quiries to be made before the parties who have a 
knowledge of the matter are out of the way. : 

The amendment of Mr. Jenks was adopted, as 
follows : 

"And that such committee further inquire 
whether or not at the time said Burrill claims to 
have obtained credits for Boston's quota, how 
many of the men were at that date dead, for which 
he ciaimed an allowance?" 

As amended the order was passed. 

On motion of Mr. Tucker of Ward Six it was or- 
dered that when the Council adjourn, it be for two 
weeks : * 

Adjourned to Thursday evening, June 24, at 8 
o'clock. 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



148 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 
JUNE 14, 1869. 



The regular weekly meeting of the Board of 
Aldermen was held this afternoon at 4 o'clock, 
Mayor Shurtleff presiding. 

JURORS DRAWN. 

Four grand iurors and three petit jurors were 
drawn for the United Slates District Court. 

APPOINTMENTS MADE AND CONFIRMED. 

Special Police Officers. One hundred and thirty- 
six persons as special police officers for the pres- 
ent week. 

Peter Crowley, for duty at Lewis wharf; Samuel 
Wilson, Jr., for duty at the Coliseum: Henry C. 
Bliss, for duty at north side of Faneuil Hall Mar- 
ket; James M. Andrews and Reuben llewes, for 
duty at Gallop's Island— special police officers 
without pay. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

Henry M.Mann & Co., to be paid for damages 
sustained by the widening of Hanover street. 

Donald Kennedy and others, against the widen- 
ing and grading of Warren street. 

Thomas M. Howard, to be compensated tor~ 
damages to his well, caused by the widening of 
South Cedar street. 

Jesse Tirrill & Co. and others, that the building 
on the Ma^omber estate on Federal street be set 
back or cut off. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Streets. 

Winthrop Railroad Co., for a renewal and con- 
firmation of location, &c. 

Wm. M. Flanders and others, that the gutters in 
Edinboro' street be paved, and roadway macad- 
amized . 

Dyer & Gurney and others, that sidewalks be 
laid in Marion street. 

S. T. Snow and others, that stone steps be sub- 
stituted for wooden ones, in passageway from 
Pembroke to Newton streets, in rear of their es- 
tates. 

F. J. Baxter, lor leave to move a building across 
Charles street. 

Rebecca V. Thompson and others, that the name 
of South Cedar street be changed to Winchester 
street. 

George R. Coffin and others, that Copcland 
street be graded. 

Severally referred to the Committee on l'aving. 

M. W. Ward, and others, that a nuisance on 
Heath street be abated. 

A.. D. Hodges and others, relative to a nuisance 
in Cliff street. Severally referred to the Commit- 
tee on Health. 

Joseph G. Torrey, and others, that a common 
sewer be laid in the westerly part of Winthrop 
street. Referred to Committee on Sewers. 

D. K. Prescott, for leave to exhibit a double 
headed girl. 

John Kelley, for leave to exhibit natural curios- 
ities at No. li State street. Severally referred to 
Committee on Licenses. 

Lizzie Garrison, tor leave to hold public meetings 
in streets or public places. 

George Hardy, for leave to preach on the Com- 
mon. Severally referred to Committee on Com- 
mon, &c. 

NOTICES OF INTENTION TO BUILD. 

Michael Mulvee, Chadwick street, between 
Hampden and Yeoman streets ; Horace Partridge, 
27 to 31 Hanover street; D. H. Jacobs, 83 and 85 
Commercial street; Thomas Whalen, 16 Chadwick 
street; Charles Millmore, Cabot street; J. & W. 
R. Cavanagh, D street, between Eighth and Bax- 
ter streets; W. A. & S. G. Low, Old Harbor street; 
Stephen Podesta, Green street; Samuel L. Cleaves, 
W hite street, between Marien and Brooks streets ; 
Dr. R. Provan. Broadway, between E and F streets ; 
J. W. West, First street, between Federal and 
Granite streets; D. F. Lord & Son, corner of Park- 
man and White streets; S.M.Allen, Beach Glen 
and Fort avenues; E. M. Montague, Piedmont and 
Church streets; James Downey, Chelsea street; 



John Lamb, Lenox street, between Shawmut ave- 
nue and Tremont street; N.J. Bradlee, 144 Tre- 
mont street. Severally referred to the Committee 
on Streets. 

VACANCIES IN SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

A communication was received from the School 
Committee, proposing a Convention on Tuesday, 
July 13th, at 8 o'clock, to fill vacancies in that 
Board, occasioned oy the death of Calvin G. Page 
of Ward Six, and the resignation of Edwin Briggs 
o. Ward Twelve. The proposed Convention was 
concurred in. 

AUDITOR'S MONTHLY EXHIBIT. 

The monthly exhibit of the Auditor of Accounts 
was laid bef oi e the Board, presenting an exhibit 
of the General and Special Appropriations for the 
present financial year of 1809-'70, as shown in the 
books in his office, June 1, 1869, including the June 
draft, being two months' payments of r,he finan- 
cial year, exhibiting the original appropriations, 
the amount expended, and the balances of each 
unexpended at that date. A recapitulation gives 
the following result: 

Appropriations, 
Revenues, &U-. Expended. Unexpended. 

General 88,711,978 10 8773,267 3'J 87,933.708 71 

Special 3.134,737 58 281 .643 99 2.847,0^3 57 



811,848,713 66 81,080,911 33 $10,785,802 28 
Ordered to be sent down. 

ADDITIONAL APPROPRIATION FOR CHESTNUT 
HILL RESERVOIR. 

Cochituate Water Board Office, I 
January 14, 1869. ( 
To the City Council of the City of Boston: 

The Cochituate Water Board are again under 
the necessity of asking for the further sum of five 
hundred thousand dollars for the construction of 
the Chestnut Hill Reservoir. When the last ap- 
propriation was passed, we supposed, from the 
estimates made by the City and Resident Engi- 
neer, that it would be ample to complete the work. 
Contingencies have, however, arisen, which nei- 
ther they or we could have anticipated, which have 
largely increased its cost, but not sufficient to ac- 
count for this large amount. We are also aware 
that it is very difficult in a work of this magni- 
tude, and one not of an every-day occurrence, to 
make an accurate estimate, but we do not think 
there was sufficient care exercised on the part of 
the engineer in estimating the quantities of the 
various kinds of labor to be performed. 

The contingencies referred to, which were not 
estimated upon, have been, First, the builaing of 
a new water-tight dam, or puddled embankment, 
between the upper and lower basm: a work that 
became necessary for the purpose of protecting 
the aqueduct and embankment, as the pressure of 
the wafer in the upper basin had already crashed 
the conduit, and the water was working its way 
through the embankment. A too great regard for 
economy of construction, together with error ot 
]udgmcnt,was the cause o( the defect ; and although 
all the large reservoirs which have been built have 
passed through similar experience in different 
parts of their works, wc were in hopes to have 
been the exception. 

The second large item of extra cost was on the 
foundation of the Effluent Gate House, where we 
struck a vein of quicksand running to the depth of 
twenty-one feet. This of course had to be remov- 
ed so as to make the reservoir water-tight, which 
has been a very tedious and expensive job, requir- 
ing two steam pumps to be kept in constant ope- 
ration day and night to keep the trenches free 
from water durrng the removal. When it was 
about half completed, the great freshet of Febru- 
ary 15th occurred, causing a delay of several weeks 
and adding largely to its cost. 

The third item of expense was the addition of 
one quarter of an inch in the thick- 
ness of the pipes for the forty-eight inch main. 
This was deemed necessary from information ob- 
tained fiom the Croton and Fairmount Water 
Works, both of these companies haviue used a 
large number of this size pipe. 

Ihe original appropriation for this main was two 
hundred and fifty thousand dollars. The cost of 
the additional thickness, together with the gates, 
gate chamber, excavations and laying oi the pipes, 
including land and land damages, will not be less 
than three hundred thousand dollars. 



144 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



When it was ascertained that the appropriation 
already made was in no way adequate to complete 
the work, the following note was sent to the City 
Engineer: 

Boston, May 1, 1869. 
JV. Henry Crafts, Esq., City Engineer : 

Dear Sir— The Cochituate Water Board learn 
with deep regret that the estimates furnished us 
by you are in no way accurate, and that the appro- 
priation asked for, based upon those estimates, i3 
nearly exhausted. We had prided ourselves in 
being extra careiul in submitting those figures to 
the City Council, and to be again obliged to call 
upon ihem for so large an amount as we 
anticipate will be necessary to complete the work 
(judging irom what has been done) is extremely 
mortifying to us. We know that contingencies 
have arisen not estimated upon, which have added 
largely to its cost, but in no way sufficient to ac- 
count for this great discrepancy, and we hope you 
may be able at an early day to explain to our satis- 
faction, as well as to the City Council, the cause ot 
this error, together with reliable estimates for the 
completion of the work. 

Very truly yov r«, 

Nath'l J. Bradlee, 
President Cochituate Water Board. 

It will be seen by the very full report of the 
City and Besident Engineers in reply to the above 
communication, which is hereunto annexed, that 
they have very thoroughly examined the estimates 
given by them in June, lSHi.8, and those now pre- 
sented, with their explanation as to the cause of 
the discrepancies, to which we would call your at- 
tention. The appropriations already made on ac- 
.count of land, corstructicn, forty-eight inch 
mains, and the driveway, have been a s follows : 

For land $110,000 

Construction of leservoir 1.310,000 

Forty-eight inch mains 250,000 

Driveway 160,000 

$1,860,000 
The total cost to June 1st, 1869, has been as fol- 
lows: 

Tabor $692,762 72 

'learning T.... 365,655 39 

Cast iron pipes, lead, &c 184,560 11 

Land, taxes, rent, <&c 120,035 31 

Gate, houses, gates, &c 87,644 31 

Slope wall 59,287 68 

Engineering, clerks and superintending 38,831 67 

Stone 33,496 43 

Buildings, lumber and carpentering 30,563 31 

Bricks 25,568 89 

Stopcocks 20,175 00 

Clav for puddling 19,865 06 

Sundries 14,674 12 

Cement, sand and carting 13,75 1 19 

Punrps, engines and repair. . 10,655 70 

Iron castings, dram covers, &c 10.275 43 

Drain pipe 10,207 72 

Shovels, picks and tools 8,889 85 

Coal 5,U01 76 

Piles and driving ■ 4,113 83 

Flume 3,651 54 

Paving 2,203 04 

Total $1,762,530 65 

Balance on hand June, 1869, construc- 
tion 59,920 92 

Balance on hand June, 1869, driveway. 37,549 03 

Total $1,860,000 00 

It will be seen that the figures vary from those 
given by the City Engineer, as his are rnadeMay 1st 
and the above to June 1st. 

The estimate of the City Engineer for complet- 
ing the work is $422,895 00 over and above the Lal- 
arice on hand ; but from the experience of the past 
we believe the amount will lully reach $500,000. 

Having herewith submitted for your considera- 
tion all the iacts which have come to our knowl- 
edge, we earnestly request that a portion if not 
the whole of the appropriation asked for may be 
passed with as little delay as possible, or the work 
on the Keservoir will have to be suspended. 
Respectfully submitted. 

Signed by all the members of the Board. 

The communication was laid on the table and 
ordered to be printed. 



REPORT OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS FOR PUBL T C 
INSTITUTIONS. 

The twelth annual report of the Directors of 
Public Institutions was laid before the Board in 
print. Careiully prepared statements are given, 
presenting in detail the expenditures ot the seve- 
ral institutions. The principal items of the expen- 
ditures are as follows; . 

Bouse of Correction— Subsistence for officers. 
$0940 46; ior inmates $21,096 52; salaries $12,737 69; 
clothing and bedding $10,087 42; luel and lights 
$8687 67; repairs and alterations $7996 96— total 
$79,920 03. 

House of Industry. Subsistence of officers, $9,- 
S99 19; of inmates, $45,740 90; clothinir and bed- 
ding, $17,929 43 ; salaries, $16,038 35 ; luei and lights, 
$14,048 07; repairs and alterations, $8418 50; agri- 
cultural department, $5650 73; lurniture and uten- 
sils, $3360 67— total, $126,878 08. 

Lunatic Hospital. Subsistence of officers, $6,- 
142 24; of inmates, $16,335 06; salaries, $11,333 39; 
clothing and bedding, $5077 28; repairs and altera- 
tions, $4602 87 ; fuel and lights, $4172 88 ; lurniture 
and utensils, $3483 13; medical department, 
$1557 87— total, $57,910 84. 

A recapitulation gives the entire expenses, as fol- 
lows : 

House of Correction $ 79,920 03 

House of Industry 126,878 OS 

Lunatic Hospital 57,910 81 

Steamboat Henry Morrison 11 672 33 

Office expenses 6,793 11 

Pauper expenses 9,492 19 

Quarantine Department 4,946 25 

Total $297,612 83 

The items of expenditure for Houses of Correc- 
tion and Industry and Lunatic Hospital are classi- 
fied as lollows: 

Subsistence, $106,854 37; salaries, $10,109 43; 
clothing and bedd-ng, $33,094 13; luel and lights, 
$26,908 62; repairs aud alterations, $^1,018 33; agri- 
cultural department, $9818 58; furniture and uten- 
sils, $8105 02; sewing machines and trimmings for 
contract work, $5143 44; medical department, 
$3744 97; soap and soap stock, $2059 05; printing 
and stationery, $1042 88; miscellaneous, $5910 13;— 
total, $261,708 95. 

The income of the several institutions was as 
follows : 

House of Corrtction, $62,952 62; House of Indus- 
try, $18,697 94; Lunatio Hospital, $8161 04; Quar- 
antine Deppartment, $2877 39; steamboat Henry 
Morrison, $2050; uauper expneses, $ 1095 23 — total, 
$95,834 24. 

The income exceeds that of the previous year by 
$18,363 50; less $3542 56 in the Lunatic Hospital, 
and more by $21,906 06 in the other institutions. 
This income is by labor in' the House oi Correction, 
$60,470 40; labor in House of Industry, $8216 79; 
board of patients in Lunatic Hospitals, $7861 06, 
which make up the larger amount. The actual 
cost is shown to be, deducting income, $201,778 59. 
The increase of expenditures over 1867-8 was $22,- 
665 77 ; actual expense, $4302 27. The increase in 
the House of Correction was $9154 27; House of 
Industry, $8835 97; Lunatic Hospital, $3047 56; 
office expenses, $1265 55; Quarantine Department, 
$2660 41. 

The special appropriations duiing the year have 
been $48,000 for a new workshop at the House of 
Correction, and $10, 1)00 for building a new school 
for the pauper girls at Deer Island. Nearly all of 
the appropriations for the workshop have been ex- 
pended, and but a small portion lor the school. 
The expenditures on account of the new Lunatic 
Hospital have amounted to $1975 24, of which 
amount $1009 35 was for collations to the City 
Council and to Committees of the same, and to the 
Association of Medical Superintendents of Ameri- 
can Hospitals for the Insane. 

The average number of inmates for the year was 
as follows: 

House of Correction, 145; House of Industry, 131 ; 
Almshouse, 263 ; House of Keformation (boys), 261, 
girls, 36; Lunatic Hospital, 187; total, 1623, or an 
increase of 254 over tne previous year. The in- 
crease was— House of Correction, 56; Industry, 62; 
Almshouse, 35; boys, 86; girls, 3; Hospital, 12. 

The average actual cost was per week, in House 
of Correction, 73 cents. House ot Industry, Reform- 
ation and Almshouse, $2 10 ; Hospital, $5 12. This 
is based on expenditures, less amount of income 



JUNE 14, 1869 



145 



paid into tbe city treasury, riot accounting tor ex- 
traordinary expenses or interest on cost of build- 
ings. 

The report states that there is a continued in- 
crease in the numtier of inmates of the public in- 
stitutions which keeps pace with tbe growth of 
tbe city, and only by uie strictest economy in the 
management of the expenditures, and employment 
of all the pauper and piison labor, can we hope to 
Keep the cost of maintenance withm moderate 
bounds. In this connection it is stated that the 
several superintendents merit our continued con- 
fidence for their energy and fidelity in tbe dis- 
charge of their arduous duties. Regret is ex- 
pressed at tbe loss by deatb of Francis C. Maiming 
n member of the Board, justly held in higb esteem, 
who was a useful and zealous laborer in every 
measure of a charitable nature, and conscientious 
in the discharge of his public dutieo. 

Attention is invited to tbe reports of the Super- 
intendent s of the various institutions and to the 
cbanges which have taken place in the localities of 
them. More room is required in all of them, while 
the Lunatic Hospital is in a more crowded cor Li- 
tton than either of the others. In this institution 
more patients are provided for than in tue elabor- 
ate and extensive conveniences ot the At-ylum at 
Soineiville. In addition to the call idr a new hos- 
pital for the insane, the Board are contemplating 
the application for a separate building lor an 
Almshouse, where the unfortunate poor may be 
free from the association of the vile and dissolute. 
Particular reierence is made to the condition of 
the several institutions. 

I)etr Island. The institutions are all in the lull 
tide of success. There has been a ireedom from 
sickness during the past year, of any contagious 
nature, and there is an air of cheerfulness and 
comfort among the inmates which augurs well 
for the institutions. The buildings are kept in 
good repair, and the farming operations promise 
a fair return. Guy C. Underwood, the superin- 
tendent, seems to have infused his energy into the 
various departments, and there is a corps of un- 
der officers who are efficient and useful. Sewing 
machines, operated by stetim power, have been 
introduced in the female wing of the House of 
Industry, and their labor is profitable. Pauper 
inmates, many of whom are infirm, can accom- 
plish but small results as laborers, yet there is an 
amount of light work which they caii do to advan- 
tage, and thus assist in the operations of the in- 
stitutions. 

There is a growing necessity lor a new alms- 
house at the island and a separate building for the 
poor must soon be provided. The new school- 
house for pauper girls will be ready for occupancy 
early in the tall. The building of a sea wall on 
tbe side of the island near tbe steamboat landing, 
is commended to the attention of the City Coun- 
cil, much of the work on which may be done by 
the labor of inmates, and prove to be useful in 
several respects. The Reformation Schools are in 
a good condition. 

Lunatic Hospital. On this subject considerable 
space of the report is occupied, and tbe great ne- 
cessity of a aew hospital is strongly urged. The 
dangers from mixing together persons of every 
description of mania", to their own detriment, and 
tbe greater care and watchlulness required, the 
further danger to the lives of the inmates by the 
want of proper staircases, and the possible fearful 
catastrophe in the burning of the building or of 
collisions among the inmates, are set forth as 
urgent reasons for immediate measures to provide 
a better building. The commendable exertions of 
Dr. Walker iu providing tor the comfort of those 
under his care, particularly under the limited 
means at his command, it is said cannot be too 
highly appreciated. 

The report of tbe Superintendent shows that 87 
were admitted to the Hospital, and 64 were dis- 
charged, leaving 202 — 109 men, 93 women — a 
greater number, by 23, than last year. Of the dis- 
cbarges, 20 had recovered, 10 were more or less im- 
proved, 8 not improved, and 2G died. The deaths 
were from exhaustion, paralysis, apoplexy and 
consumption mainly. Tbe Superintendent says of 
their straitened condition: 

"All attempt at classification was long ago aban- 
doned. With our present means, it is simply im- 
possible, We can only put those together who 
will in the least degree annoy each other. No pos- 
sible enlargement here can avail anything in this 
particular. To iully appreciate the magnitude of 



this evil, it is needful to witness the disgust invol- 
untarily exhibited, and to listen to the earnest ap- 
peals for relief made daily by the better class of pa- 
tients. That serious injury is constantly wrought 
by this condxtion r f affairs, must be apparent to the 
careless observer. At the present rate of increase, 
any further accommodations, it may be found pos- 
sible to make here, will be used as soon as fur- 
nished, and the slight relief gained thereby will he 
as transient as unimportant." 

House of Correction. Attention is called to this 
institution with pride, upon its most efficient con- 
dition The prisoners are able to accomplish 
mu,-;b,and prison labor is in demand. T'ae new 
workshop has been completed and is in full opera- 
tion, a new wooden sbop and laundry whore the 
old wooden buildings now stand, will soon be re- 
quired. Further provision is needed in the supplv 
of cells. Tbe libraries ol the various institutions 
have been sustained at a small outlay and from 
friendly contributions. Attention is called to the 
fact that many books on hand, out of use or 
thrown aside, would be acceptable in tilling these 
libraries. 

Almshouse. In the Almshouse, as appears by 
the report of the Superintendent, the laigest num- 
ber during the year was 336 ; there were 51 deaths, 
—men, 28; women, 20; boys 4, gills, 2. The 
whole number discharged during the year was 
490; admitted,-506; there were 68 boys and girls 
admitted, and 50 discharged. 

House of Reformation. Number committed dur- 
ing the year was f84 boys, 20 girls; discharged, 132 
boys, 16 girls ; remaining, 272 boys, 42 girl's. The 
offences were — vagrancy, 93; tru'aney, 90; larceny, 
20; stubbonness, 4; idle and dissolute, 2. Tbe 
boys' department is very much crowded. 

tionse of Industry. The commitments during 
the year were 1134 males, 1797 females; discharged, 
1090 males, 1788 females; remaining, 178 males, 213 
females. Of these, 1753 were for non-payment of 
fines and costs, 515 on sentences of two" months, 
272 of three months. The fines and costs of 201 
prisoners have been paid, amounting to $1950 15. 
The average gain on weight of prisoneis on their 
discharge over their admission is 6% pounds for 
men and 9>£ for women. The number of deaths 
was 7 males, 2 females. The products of the farm 
showed good results. 

HEARINGS ON ORDEBS OP NOTICE. 

The hearings on the petititions of the Metropoli- 
tan Railroad Company for a location of their track 
on Harrison avenue, from Dover street, to connect 
with their track on Eustis street; on the proposed 
widening of Harrison avenue, on the intention of 
Russell Scott to build ; and on the proposed wid- 
ening of Federal street, between High and Pur- 
chase streets, were severally taken up for consid- 
eration. No person appearing in either case, the 
reports were recommitted. 

The hearing on the petition of John Ritchie and 
others that one uniform name be given to East 
and West Chester park, and Chester square, and 
the remonstrants asrainst the same, was taken up, 
and postponed for one week. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

The following orders were read a second time 
and passed: 

Report and order for Committee on Public Build- 
ings to build an addition to house of Hook and 
Ladder Company No. 4, at a cost of $3000. 

Resolves and orders to lay out or to widen Ward 
street by taking 139 square feet of laud, at a cost 
of $100. 

Resolves and orders to lay out or to widen Cope- 
land street by taking 5960 square feet of land, at a 
cost of $2384. 

On motion of Alderman Talbot, the several or- 
ders for laying out, widening and grad'ng streets 
on Fort Hill were laid on the table. 

COMMON COUNCIL PAPERS. 

The following orders were passed in concur- 
rence : 

Report and order for enlargement of Police Sta- 
tion No. 6. at a cost of $13,000, to be transferred 
from Reserved Fund. 

Order for Committee on Claims to inquire, 

1. Whether Mr. Burnll furnished the number 
of men to the city's quota which be claims. 

2. Whether some of these men were not also 
credited to other towns and cities in this State. 

3. Whether some ot these men were not credit- 
ed to towns and cities in other States. 



146 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



4. Whether suits are riot now pending between 
said claimant and other towns and cities lor men 
so furnished to Boston. 

5. Whether many of said men so furnished, as 
alleged, were not already dead; and that said 
Committee have power to send for persons and 
papers. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 

Alderman White, from the Committee on Li- 
censes, reporteii in favor of the petitions severally, 
lor licenses to W. H. Lragard, to give an exhibi- 
tion at Selwyn's Theatre; to Mrs. M. J. Mooney, to 
give concerts at Mercantile Hall, June 15, 16 and 
17 ; and of Dexter Smith, to give concerts at Music 
Hall. Accepted. 

The same committee also reported favorably on 
licenses to four newsboys, and two boys as boot- 
blacks, anil for the licensing of sundry peisons as 
innholders, auctioneers, lor intelligence offices, 
and lor transter of wagon licenses. Severally ac- 
cepted. 

The Committee reported leave to withdraw on 
petition of Winans. Eno & Co. for leave to ex- 
hibit the "Steam King" on Boylston street. Ac- 
cepted. 

Alderman Fairbanks, from the Committee on 
Sewers, reported leave to withdraw on the petition 
of Stephen Bowen, for an extension of Greuville 
street sewer; and no action necessary on the peti- 
tion of Charles H. Bieier and others icr the open- 
ing and cleaning of the Broadway sewer from C to 
I> streets. Accepted. 

Alderman James, from the Committee on Pav- 
ing, reported no action necessary on the petition 
of John L. Hunnewell aud others. Accepted. 

Alderman Talbot, from the Committee on Streets, 
reported no action necessary on sundry notices of 
intention to build. Accepted. 

Alderman Richards, from the Joint Standing 
Committee on Public Buildings, respectfully repre- 
sented that there will be needed lor the comple- 
tion of the Ward Room in Ward Wine and Hose 
House No. 8 an additional appropriation of 
$2000. The original appropriation for this 
building was $20,000, of which amount there has 
been expended for carpentry, $7504 49 ; masonry, 
$10,390; plans, specifications, &c, $1022 10; ven- 
tilators and vane, $477 25; fitting up hose tower, 
manure tanks, $421 59— total, $19,815 13. 

There will be required for extra filling, bank 
walls and foundations, $1500; heating apparatus 
and plumbing, $500— total, $2000. 

Your committee would therefore respectfully 
recommend the passage of the following order: 

Ordered, That the Auditor of Accounts be au- 
thorized to transfer the sum ol $2000 from the Re- 
served Fund to the appropriation tor Ward Boom, 
Ward Nine, aud Hose House No 8. 

Bead twice and passed. 

Alderman Talbot submitted the following report. 

Whereas, Mary S. T. Macomber, wife of Wm. 
Macomber, and Jeremiah Brown, have neglected 
to remove the portions of their buildings on Fed- 
eral street, projecting over the line of widening of 
said street, as established by a resolve approved 
June 6, 1868, it is therefore hereby 

Ordered, That due notice be given the said Mary 
S. T., wife of Wm. Macomber, "and the said Jere- 
miah Brown, and all other persons or parties in- 
terested, that the Board intends to so move back 
the buildings on the estates belonging to them 
that no portions of the same shall project over the 
said new line of Federal street, and that Monday, 
the 28th day of June, at 4 o'clock, P.M., is assigned 
as the day lor hearing any objections which may 
be made to such action on the part of this Board. 

On a petition for the closing of the markets, Al- 
derman Seaver oflered the foUowing order, which 
was passed •• 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of the Market 
be directed to close the Faneuil Hall Market 
nouses at 12 o'clock M.,on the 16th and 17th inst. 

A communication was received from Major 
Jones, State Constable, stating that several per- 
sons keeping booths near the Coliseum had been 



prosecuted ana convicted for selling liquois, 
whereupon Alderman Seaver presented the lol- 
lowing, which was passed: 

Whereas, It appears to this Board that certain 
booths or sheds in the vicinity of the Musical Fes- 
tival Building on St. James park, so-called, are oc- 
cupied and used for the purpose of the sale of 
spirituous or fermented liquors, by Otis Soule, 
Francis A. Chase, INathaniel Curtis. Edward 
Wheeler, Frank P. Mai tin, and Samuel Gotlieb ; it 
is hereby 

Ordered, That the Chief-of- Police be directed to 
notify each of the above persons to vacate his 
booth or shed and to close the same forthwith; 
and the said Ohief-of-PoIice is iurther ordered, in 
case of a non-compliance by any of said occupants 
of booths or sheds to close the same as directeo, 
to pulldown, remove or destroy said booths or 
sheds as a nuisance to the neighborhood. 

ORDERS PASSED. 

On motion of Alderman Richards, 

Ordered, That the Ward Uoi.m of Ward Fifteen 
be established, until otherwise ordered, in the new 
Station House building on Pynchon street. 

On motion of Aldeiman James, 

Ordeied, That the Chief of Folice be directed to 
notify the owners and abutters on Marion street, 
from White to Bennington streets, to lav their 
sidewalks with brick. 

On motion of Alderman Talbot, 

Ordered, That there be paid to Alice C. Driscoll 
$5000, tor land taken and damages occasioned by 
the extension of Broadwav, by a resolve approved 
May 3, 1869, 

Ordeied, That there be paid to Lemuel Shaw and 
Henry G. Denny, executors and trustees under the 
will ot Alfred L. Baury, $17,000, in part pay- 
ment tor land taken from tneir estate to widen 
Hanover.street, by a resolve approved December 31 , 
lfc>68, for damage to buildings thereon, caused by 
said widening, ana for the cost ot rebuilding iront's 
of said buildings upon the new line ot saia Hano- 
ver street. 

On motion of Alaerman lairbanks, 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Sewer? be 
hereby directed to rebuild a portion of the sewer 
at the foot of Mount Vernon street, rendered 
necessary by the laying out of the street to the 
Commissioners' line; tne expense to be charged 
to the appiopriation for widening streets. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Sewers be 
hereby directed to rebuild the sewer under Foster 
& Leighton's wharf, at the foot of Lexington 
street, East Boston, the expense to be charged to 
th e appropriation lor sewers. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Sewers be 
directed to construct a commen sewer in Cedar 
street, between Highland street and Lambert av- 
enue, and report a schedule of the expense thereof 
to this Board. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Sewers be 
directed to construct a sewer in Purchase street, 
between Congress and Federal streets, and report 
a schedule ol the expense thereof to this Board. 

Ordered, That the Superintendent of Sewers be 
directed to construct a sewer in Rockville place, 
and repoit a schedule of the expense to this Board. 

Ordered, That the Superintenaent ol Sewers be 
directed to construct a sewer in Forest street and 
Mount Pleasant avenue, at the northerly end, and 
report a schedule of the expense to this Board. 

On motion of Alderman James, 

Ordered, That the City Treasurer be and he is 
hereby directed to abate the assessment of $28 81 
against the estate of John A. Hoage on Lexington 
street. East Boston. 

On motion of Alderman Talbot, 

A notice to quit was ordered to be served on 
Patrick Kenna and others to remove all obstruc- 
tions from the line of widening of Wara street be- 
fore the 1st of July. 

On motion of Alderman Baldwin, 

The vote by which the Board refused licenses to 
Morris Brothers and to Rich, Hart & Trowbridge 
for musical performances near the Coliseum were 
reconsidered, and said licenses were granted. 

Adjournea. 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 



147 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proceedings of the Board of Aldermen, 

JUNE 21, I860. 



Tbe regular weekly meeting of tlie Board of Al- 
dermen was held, this afternoon, at 4 o'clock, the 
Mayor presiding. 

JURORS DRAWN. 

Six traverse, jurors were drawn for the Superior 
Court, criminal term. 

APPOINTMENTS MADE AND CONFIRMED. 

Constable— Geo. B. Proctor. 

Special Police Officers— (without pay, the several 
Superintendents of bathing houses, as follows): 1, 
West Boston bridge, H. A. Willard ; 2, East Cam- 
bridge bridge, Robert Bruce; 3 and 4. Warren 
bridge, K. C. Anderson; 5 and C, East Boston, Ed- 
ward McDonnell; 7, Arch wharf, D. Moore; 8, 
Mount Washington avenue, James Polbeare ; 9 and 
10, South Boston, Job X. Souther; 11 and 12, Dover 
street bridge. Josiah Canfield ; 13 and 14, Cabot 
street, A. S. Parker; 15, Swett street, John Myers. 

PETITIONS PRESENTED AND REFERRED. 

Joseph Leonard and others, that gas lamps be 
placed and lighted on Lambert avenue, between 
Cedar and Dover streets. .Referred to the Com- 
mittee on Lamps. 

Freeman Richardson and others, that the privies 
of tbe Comins Schoolhouse be constructed in some 
other location than the one proposed. Referred to 
Committee on Public Buildings. 

Flint Peaslee, for license to exhibit wild animals 
and natural cuaiosities at 112 Hanover street. Re- 
ferred to Committee on Licenses. 

Samuel A. Way, for leave to build a stable on 
Hudson street, near Curve street. Referred to 
Committee on Health. 

Edwin Ray and others, in aid of the petition of 
Wm. Whiting and others, for the widening and 
grading of Warren street. Reterred to the Com- 
mittee on Stregts. 

Superintendent of Public Buildings, for a sewer 
in Washington street, between Tremont street and 
the Comins Schoolhouse. Referred to the Com- 
mittee on Sewers. 

Aaron D. Weld & Co. and 232 others, Chickering 
& Sons and 127 others, a rederick Gould and 107 
others, G. W. Walker ard 103 others, Daniel B. 
Stedman and 62 others, Geo. W. Parmenter and 
63 others, Geo. Lunt & Co. and 61 others, Worth- 
ington, Flanders & Co. and 58 others, Thomas D. 
Demond and 104 others, Pickering, Winslow & Co. 
and 91 others, Benton, Coverly & Co. and 61 oth- 
ers, James Boyd & Sons and 33 others, George H. 
Plumer and 04 others, Austin Gove & Son and 55 
others, Oliver Frost and 112 others, severally for 
the purchase of the East Boston Ferry Company's 
property and franchise by the city. Referred to 
the Committee on Ferries. 

NOTICES OF INTENTION TO BUILD. 

Margaret Briody, Cabot street, near Tremont 
street; John Lahey, 114 Prince street; T. K. Daunt, 
Sixth street, between C and D streets; Edward 
McGuikian, corner of Ward and Hallock streets ; 
Asa Lewis, 107, 109 Harrison avenue; Robert 
Moore, rear of 54 to 60 Endicott street; J. & J. 
Ryan, Sixth street, between C and D streets; Wm. 
B. Gage, Yeoman street, between Adams and Or- 
chard streets; Webb & Ward, Seventh street, 
between I and K streets; Bernard Lynch, Ninth 
street, between E and T streets; John Hegan, 
Linden park ; Edward O'Connor, Fourth street, 
between F and Dorchester streets ; S. E.Sellon, 
Princeton street, between Marion and Piescott 
streets; V. Chipman & Son, corner of Hanover, 
Blackstone and Marshall streets; J. L. Simonds, 
28 Piedmont street; John Oavanagh, 158 Prince 
street; J. P. McKay, Shawmut avenue, between 
Oakland and Thornton streets; Damon & Camp- 
bell, East Newton street, near Harrison avenue; 
A. C. Martin, corner of Brimmer and Mount Ver- 
non streets; J. A. Bell, corner of Fourth and B 
streets. 



Referred to the Committee on Streets. 

HEARINGS ON ORDERS OF NOTICE. 

The hearing on order of notice on the petition of 
Patrick McAleer for leave to place a steam engine 
in building No. 15 Province street was taken up. 
No person appearing, the report was recommitted. 
The hearing on the order ot notice on the pro- 
posed construction of a sewer through Atlantic 
avenue was taken up. 

Charles A. Welch appeared for the Central 
Wharf Co., objecting to the proposed termination 
of the sewer as an injury to their property, and to 
the work as a great hindrance to their business. 
To show this, he called several witnesses. 

H. M. Whitney, agent of Metropolitan Steamship 
Company, stated that the work of constructing a 
sewei down the wharf would make such an inter- 
ruption as to make it almost impossible to do bus- 
iness. The Steamship Company were now freight- 
ing a steamship every other day wjth trom 1200 to 
1500 tons freight. The interruption would be such 
as to require tbe removal of one or both of them, 
and require a large increase of the laboring and 
clerical force of the Company. At times in the 
fall a steamer is dispatched every day. The in- 
creased expense would be from $1200 to $1800 a 
week. 

James M. Blaney, wharfinger at Central wharf, 
objected to carrying the drain to the end of 
Central Wharf, on account of the tendency to fill 
up the harbor. The currents from South* Boston 
and Charlestown meet at the end of Central 
Wharf and form an eddy, so that sediment is not 
carried out, but deposited at the bottom of the 
water. There is a bar about 200 leet from Central 
Wharf. The construction of a sewer, as proposed, 
would almost entirely stop the business on the 
wharf, for it would require to be of fourteen feet 
depth. 

Daniel Sampson, agent of the Baltimore & Nor- 
folk line of steamers, confirmed the statements of 
Mr. Blaney relative to the meeting of the currents 
and the bar near the end of the wharf, upon which 
occasionally the boats ground, The bar increases 
and has been dug out twice within his knowledge. 
William E. Richardson, wharfinger at Central 
wharf, stated in confirmation of previous state- 
ments, that there was a continuous shoaling in 
near the end of the wharf, much to the sur- 
prise often of captains of steamers, who found 
that their vessels grounded when they did not ex- 
pect it. The proof of the meeting of the currents 
is shown from the manner of floating off the 
ice in winter. The deposit by a sewer at the 
point proposed would have a tendency to increase 
the shoaling. The Superintendent ot the building 
of the avenue agreed with him that it would be 
better to carry the sewer to the end of the ave- 
nue. 

Jos. W. Leighton, superintendent of work on 
the avenue, stated that he saw no reason why the 
drains could not be carried down the avenue, and 
emptied into the dock near the ferry, where 
there was a brisk current. The distance would be 
greater, but the amount of excavation would not 
be so great. The extension of the drain down the 
wharf would require at least four months, from 
the difficulties in respect to the tide that would 
have to be overcome. 
The report was recommitted. 
The hearing of parties advocating o« § opposing 
the proposition to give one uniform name to East 
Chester Paik, Chester square and West Chester 
park was taken up. 

G. A. Somerby appeared for some of the peti- 
tioners residing in East and West Chester parks 
and Chester square, and for various business 
men, who have experienced great difficulties from 
the treble numbering of houses in those localities'. 
There are 190 houses in those streets, and to get 
rid of the dfficul ties they desire a uniform num- 
bering of those streets continuously. 

vVm. D. Forbes, residing at 33 Chester park, east 
of Washington street, for six and a halt years, had 
been annoyed by the constant confusion arising 
from numbers, lie often received packages de- 
signed tor West Chester park and Chester square, 
and as olten his own packages were sent to those 
other streets. This difficulty would be increased 
by the building of new houses on those streets. 
He could see no objection to one name for 
the continuous street, and did not think it 
would injure the property in any of those 



148 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



streets. It would be immaterial what the name 
was, whether Chester was retained, or some oth- 
er name was taken. In his opirion, it would be 
beneficial to real estate holders to have the name 
the same and the numbers continuous. 

In reply to A. A. lianney. he did not see any ob- 
jection to numbering: the streets continuously 
across Washington street, and applying the same 
rule to other streets as well as this street, or at 
least that the numbering should be in this as in 
some other streets, east and west from Washing- 
ton street. The difficulties in regard to his own 
packages occurred on an average two or three 
times a week. For the public convenience, he be- 
lieved this change should take plaee. 

John A. Lewis had resided at No. 10 Chester 
park lor eight years. Ever since he had lived there 
constant difficulties had occurred relative to the 
triplicate numbering. At one time there were 
four sets of numberson those streets. He could 
not see any reason for a decrease in the value ot 
property by a unitorm name and numbering. If 
there was a uniform name and numbering he be- 
lieved it would be of great convenience, and add 
value to the property. He had never he?rd any 
man say that he realized no inconvenience from 
the triplicate numbering. 

In answer to Mr. Kanney, he said the difficulty 
was less than formerly, as the friends of the resi- 
dents became more familiar with the localities. 
A change in numbers might cause inconvenience 
for a time to the residents in Chester square, but 
eventually all the inconvenience would be done 
away with. The time is now favorable because of 
the making of new numbers to a portion of the 
street. 

George H. Leonard, residing at 27 Chester park 
lor five years, testified to having frequent difficul- 
ties on account of the numbering ot the street. 
Not only friends had difficulties in finding his 
house, but he had lost his dinners and other arti- 
cles, and several times a week he suffered in vari- 
ous ways, through packages being sent to the 
wrong place. As an owner of prooeiiy, he saw no 
reason why a uniform name should not be given 
to the continuous street. 

Axel Dearborn, residing at 37 Chester square for 
nearly six years, related bis experience as much 
like those preceding him. In fact, he believed his 
difficulties were greater than those of many oth- 
ers on the square, for the reason that 37 Chester 
park is a boarding house, and there are a much 
larger number of people in the house. At Christ- 
mas, he had toys enough lett at his house 
to set up a toy-shop "with. So great had 
been the annoyance to his iamily, in the lrequent 
leaving of packages there, that he gave orders to 
have such articles left on the halltable until called 
for. A letter left in that way once, remained there 
four weeks. In regard to the recent remonstrance 
against the change of numbers in Chester square, 
many of the signers baa stated that they admitted 
the thing was all wrong, and that ther e should be but 
one name and numberingfor the continuous street. 
He saw no objection to one name, and the least 
that could be done would be to number east and 
west of Washington street. In the making of 
changes there were inconveniences, sometimes, 
but in the end the advantages of the change would 
be very clear. 

In reply to Mr. Ranney, he could see no objection 
to calling the street an avenue, as suggested by 
Mr. Somerby. In the unfinished condition of the 
street, at either end, the numbering from Wash- 
ington street each way would remove much of the 
difficulty. 

Sterne Morse resided at what was 41 Chester 
park, for nine years. In addition to the other in- 
conveniences testified to, at one time an undertak- 
er brought a coffin there, designed for some other 
place, to the discomfort of his wife, who was sick. 
The uame of Chester squaie he considered to be a 
misnomer, and be could conceive ot no injury to 
property or property holders to have one continu- 
ous street. 

In answer to Mr. Ranney, he said the fault in the 
wrong delivery cf packages was sometimes in mis- 
directions, yet it was not strange that any one not 
very familiar with the distinctions should make 
mistakes. 

J. F. Beals, expressman at the South End, testi- 
fied to frequent difficulties in relation to carrying 
packages, often from misdirection of "square" for 
"street" and "street" for "square." The names of 
umerous dealers in the market were read, in fa- 



vor of the proposed change, on account of the dif- 
ficulties experienced by them. 

J. M. Douglass, City and South End Express, 
often experieni ed difficulties in misdirection. 
These misdirections he could correct hirnselt if he 
saw them, but from change of drivers occasional- 
ly, the mistakes are not always corrected, and a 
great amount of time is lost in finding the right 
places. There are difficulties experienced in rela- 
tion to the numbers of other streets, east and west 
of Washington street, but not to any extent as 
with the streets in question. He did not think it 
was stupidity which caused the mistakes, for he 
thougtit he might sometimes confuse even Mr. 
Uanhey in half an hour. 

W. Whitteuiore, No. 50 Chester park, testified 
to the same difficulties experienced by others, 
almost enough to require the services of an extra 
girl. Frequently packages are delivered with 
the number simply, and not the name, and often 
mistakes are made by the person delivering them. 

On motion ot Alderman Baldwin, the further 
bearing was postponed to Monday next. 

REPORTS OP COMMITTEES. 

Alderman Fairbanks, from the Committee on Li- 
censes, reported a renewal of the licenses of auc- 
tioneers, as follows : 

Samuel Hatch & Co., N. A. Thompson & Co., J. 
K. Porter & Co., George It. flichborn & Co., Cow- 
ing & Hatch, Harris & Phinney, Samuel A. 
Walker, John H. Lester, George B. Faunce, John 
Ollis, F. D. Osgood & Atwood. Severally ac- 
cepted. 

The same committee reported in favor of licenses 
to Smith, Nathans & Co. for exhibition of a circus 
at South Boston and hast Boston, Trowbridge & 
Hart for a concert at East Boston; also licenses to 
four newsboys and oue boy as a bootblack. Ac- 
cepted. 

Alderman James, from the Committee on Public 
Lands, reported leave to withdraw on petition of 
Bradford Perry, for removal of restrictions on 
land on Tremont street ; of Chas. Faulkner, lor 
modification of conditions in the sale of land at 
37 East Springfield street; and no action required 
on petition of Perkins & Jacques, for release from 
conditions on land in Tremont street, the parties 
having the right asked tor. Accepted. 

Alderman James, from the Committee on Com- 
mon, &c., reported leave to withdraw on the peti- 
tion of Lizzie Garrison for leave to hold meetings 
in public streets, or places. Accepted. 

CHURCH STREET DISTRICT. 

Alderman Richards, from the Committee on the 
Church Street District, submitted a report, repre- 
senting that, owing to the widening of streets on 
said District, the taking ot land tor school and 
other purposes, and the surrender of estates to 
the city, involving large expenditures of money 
not included in the original estimates, an addi- 
tional appropriation will be required to complete 
the improvement. 

From a carefully prepared statement by the 
Commissioners, it appears that the total expendi- 
tures for items in trie original estimate amount, 

at the present time, to... $385,902 43 

The estimated expenditures on account 
of work to be performed under the 
original orders for the improvement 

amount to 225,000 00 

Making the total expense for raising 

buildings and territory, grading 

streets,&c $G11,902 43 

The amount authorized to be expended, 
under an order passed May 22, 1869, for 
doing said work, was 650,000 00 

By which it appears that the committee 
has performed the work for about 
$38,000 less than the original esti- 
mates. 

The appropriations heretofore made 

amount to 700,000 00 

Which has been expended as follows : 
1st. Items included in original estimate : 

For raising buildings 265,007 47 

Forfilling 85,500 00 

For paving, sewers, raising water pipes, 
salaries Commissioners, printing, &c, 35,334 96 

Total $385,902 43 



JUNE 2 1, 1869 



149 



2d. Items not included in original estimates: 
For moving back buildings on account 

ot widening streets 35,000 00 

Forestates surrendered 191,46